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Full text of "Bucknell Alumni Monthly, October 1920 – June 1924"

Bucknell Alu mni Monthly 



Vol. V 



Lewisburg, Pa., October, 1920 



No. 1 




Probably the best all-round squad 
of Bucknell's football history is in the 
hands of Coach C. W. E. Reynolds this 
year. While other years have seen a 
small group of first-class men, never 
has there been so large a number of 
men of Varsity calibre. 

In the backfield Captain Joe Kostos 
is one of the headiest and steadiest 
players who has ever worn the Orange 
and Blue. As running mates he has 
Gdaniec, a brother of "Joe" Gdaniec, 
'15, who is very speedy, McGraw, a 
powerful, aggressive halfback. Garrison, 



The 1920 Varsity Squad 

a fast man on offense, and Dayhoff, 
who also plays quarterback. 

Arda Bowser at fullback is already 
regarded as one of the best men the 
season has shown among Eastern col- 
leges. He has this year developed a 
plunging ability which makes him a 
sure ground-gainer. 

Other quarterbacks are Mangan, a 
veteran of three years, Bellock, a fresh- 
man from Indiana Normal, and John- 
son, a son of Judge Johnson, '96. 

At end MacDermott is playing his 
fourth year; for the other end position 



there is a beautiful fight on between 
Butler, Julian, Wargo, Hahn, and 
Reid. Reid, who played center for 
Lewisburg High School last year, is one 
of the finds of the season; he has play- 
ed at center, guard, and end. 

Dooley and Homan are apparently 
the fi.xtures for the tackle positions, 
while for guards Reynolds can choose 
from Morett, Lauster, Wilsbach, Coene, 
Jemison, all men of weight and ag- 
gressiveness. 

Bihl at center alternates with Reid 
and Lauster. . 



BUCKNELL BOOSTERS 
AT THE PENN GAME 



The Penn game served as a rallying 
point for the Alumni in and about 
Philadelphia. Among those who were 
present were the following: C. A. Reed, 
■20; H. L. D. Moore, '20; Elton Rich- 
ards, '20, of Crozer; T. S. Hilaire Bit- 
ner, ex-'21; H. M. Weber, '20; Stadu- 
lis, ex'21; McAloose, ex-'23; A. P. 
King, ex-'21; Kenneth Lewis, ex-'22; 
Zeller, ex- '21; McDowell, ex-'22; Mul- 
len, ex-'22; Dale Spotts, 'IS; Bucher, 
'19; Frank W. Ingram, ' ; Heikes, 
ex-'18, and Gibbs, ex-'20, of Jefferson 
Medical College; Piekarski, '20; John- 
son, '20; Bell, '20, of Penn Law School; 
Annan, '16, of Emmitsburg, Md.; 
"Stren" McCormick, '04, who is at pres- 
ent manufacturing the "Gas Goat" 
Commercial Truck, and resides at 901 
W. 64th St., Philadelphia; G. W. Lees, 
'20, with the Bell Telephone Co.; "Sid" 
Peak, '20; Kolb, '20; "Cort" Williams, 
'19, with the U. S. Cast Iron Pipe and 
Foundry Co., of Burlington, N. J.; 
"Jim" Groflf, '09, of the Construction 



Department of the Pennsylvania R. R.; 
Mialcolm Musser, '18, of Salem, N. J.; 
Umlauf, '20, who is with W. S. Wilcox 
at the Richards Mfg. Co., of Philadel- 
phia; Clayton Yon, '20, of Atlantic 
City; Louis Tripician, '15; Dr. "Billy" 
Thompson, '01; E. B. Cooke, ex-'21, 
with the State Highway Dept., 17th 
District at Tamaqua; Geiger, '15, of 
Peddie; Walter Lotte, '14, of Paterson ; 
Hamlin, '15; Grice, '18, of Claymont, 
Del.; Starkweather, '19 and Pedigo, '17, 
with Grice at the General Chemical Co.; 
Professor F. E. Rockwood, of Over- 
brook; Atho! Wise, '06; Margaret and 
Frances Groff; Connelly, '20; George 
Benjamin, '20; J. C. Pierce, ex-'19, now 
with the Guarantee Trust Co., of New 
York; Earl B. West, '17, Harry J. 
Wagner, '20; Paul Stolz, '20; Joe Hen- 
derson, '08; Dr. Samuel Bolton, '85; A. 
R. Garner, '99; Walter Bower, '18; Ray- 
mond Tice, '19; Ray Speare, '17, E. C. 
Cupp, '19; A. T. Sherk. ex- '20; H. D. 
Germer, '20; I. P. Sowers, '17, Judge 
A. W. Johnson, '96; Joe Dent,. '20; 
Boyd Newcomb, '18; James P. Harris, 
'12; E. R. Hassrick, '18; Elinor Hyatt, 
'19; F. B. Jaekel, '03; F. D. Jones, '19; 



Barton Mackey, ex-'lS; Lester Fowle, 
ex-'20; Geo. S. Metzger, '10; C. B. 
Moore, '20; Wm. D. Reading, '14; Louis 
W. Robey, '04; Paul R. Wendt, '13; 
Louis W. Sipley, 'IS; Ralph Winegard- 
ner, '09; Charles Kremer, ex-'23; Henry 
L. Fonda, '18; S. B. Dunlap, '03'; 
Thomas Wood, '05, of Muncy; Paul G. 
Smith, '05, and A. O. "Barney" 'V'orse, 
'05, of Harrisburg; Earl "Tip" Topham, 
of Philadelphia; Ralph Crozer, ex-'03; 
Mr. and Mrs. Edw. Flint, '98, of Phila- 
delphia. 

From Lewisburg President Hunt, 
Professors Heim, Grififith, Thomas and 
Lindemann, and among the towns- 
people Howard Stahl and J. P. S. Strick- 
ler, were present, besides a large dele- 
gation of students. 



-®- 



Athletic Committee Meets 



The Athletic Governing Board met 
at Philadelphia October 2, and made 
plans for an Alumni Athletic Associa- 
tion. Details of this plan will be pub- 
lished later. 



192213 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



Bucknell Alumni Monthly 

LEO L. ROCKWELL, '07, 
Editor 
H. S. EVERETT, '12, 
Advertising Manager 
Published monthly during the college 
year by the Bucknell Lfniversity 
Alumni Association. 

Entered as second-class mail matter 
at the Postoffice at Lewisburg, Pa., 
under the act of Congress, March 3, 
1879. 

Annual suliscription to non-members, 
$2.00. 

To life members under the $10 plan, 
«1.50. 

To life members under the new plan, 
it is sent gratis. 

To annual members under the new 
plan, subscription is included in the 
annual dues. 

Checks should be made payable to 
Frank M. Simpson, Treas. 



THE NEW POLICY 



With this issue THE ALUMNI 
MONTHLY enters upon a new form, 
and undertakes a new policy. 

The form, we believe, will recommend 
itself to our readers. More compact 
and easily handled, it lends itself more 
readily to variety of make-up and to 
binding. It is at the same time more 
economical of paper, an item of im- 
portance just now. Finally, it is one 
of the two standard sizes adopted by 
"Alumni Magazines Associated", in 
which the ALUMNI MONTHLY has 
this year obtained membership. 

The new policy is really not alto- 
gether new, being in part a reversion to 
pre-war policy. The Alumni will re- 
call that prior to 1918 the MONTHLY 
was on a subscription basis, the annual 
charge at that time being a dollar a 
year. Therefore the decision of the 
Board of Managers of the Alumni As- 
sociation at its mid-summer meeting to 
put the MONTHLY on a subscription 
basis for the ensuing year is really only 
a return to the original plan. 

In view of the well-known increase in 
printing costs and the more ambitious 
program laid out for the MONTHLY, 
the annual subscription fee has been 
fixed at $2. However, for annual mem- 
bers of the Alumni Association this 
subscription price is included in the 
• membership fee of $2.50. For life mem- 
bers under the old plan, i. e. for those 
who obtained life membership by the 
payment of $5 or $10, the price will be 
$1.50, and to those wishing to obtain 
life membership under the new plan 
by the payment of $25, it will be sent 
gratis. The Board regrets that it is 
financially impossible to send the 
MONTHLY gratis to life members 
under the old plan, but feels that they 
will appreciate the situation. 

A new departure this year will be the 
admission of advertising. It is plan- 
ned only to make this feature not a 
means of partial support for the under- 
taking, but to make of it a real service 
to the Alumni. Professor H. S. Ever- 



ett, '12, has consented to take charge of 
the development of this service. More 
detailed announcement of the plan will 
be found in the advertising section. 

Why a New Policy? 

Alumni who are familiar with the 
history of the MONTHLY will ap- 
prove the move toward bringing it en- 
tirely under Alumni control and mak- 
ing it financially independent. 

While it was in its inception entirely 
an Alumni undertaking, even before the 
war it was not entirely self-supporting, 
and the annual deficit was met year by 
year by the institution. 

During the war it was for the sake of 
economy in paper and money, merged 
with the Bucknellian, but this arrange- 
ment was very unsatisfactory, due to 
the necessary curtailment of space de- 
voted to Alumni news. 

Last year the Trustees, with the de- 
sire of re-establishing it, undertook the 
entire financing of the publication, and 
it was sent gratis to all graduates on 
the Alumni list. While this policy 
served a useful end in renewing the 
loyalty of the Alumni after the conclu- 
sion of the war, it is obviously not ideal 
as a permanent arrangement. 

In the first place, there is no reason 
why the Trustees should support what 
is primarily an Alumni interest. In 
the second place, a publication under 
such control can never function quite 
so satisfactorily as an Alumni organ. 
There is danger of its degenerating into 
a mere vehicle of propaganda, and even 
if it resists this tendency, there is al- 
ways the danger of its being suspected 
of such a tendency. 

Clearly the Alumni Publication 
should be financed and controlled by 
the Alumni, and the action taken by 
the Board of Managers of the Alumni 
Association during the summer is a first 
step in this direction. The functions of 
a periodical of this character should 
in the opinion of experienced Alumni 
workers be three. It should first of all 
keep the former students informed of 
the progress and needs of Alma Mater. 
Secondly, it should keep them in touch 
with the activities of their com- 
rades of college days and other Alumni. 
Thirdly, it should serve as a clearing- 
house of Alumni opinion on the policies 
of the institution. The accepted theory 
of college administration today recog- 
nizes the right and' the duty of the 
Alumni of an institution to contribute 
from their experience to its welfare, 
and with this theory President Hunt 
and the Board of Trustees are in full 
sympathy. 

The first two functions were, we are 
confident, fairly well served by the 
MONTHLY last year. Nevertheless 
we hope to better our service in these 
respects. Several series of articles deal- 
ing with present-day faculty and stu- 
dent activities are planned, including a 
series on the various departments in 
their history and present organization, 
and current college happenings will be 
chronicled as completely as space will 
allow. Moreover, the material in our 
hands as a result of the return of our 
questionnaires by the Alumni, and the 
Alumni personals which are constantly 
coming in from many sources, will en- 
(Continued on Page Three) 



THAT ALMA MATER SONG 



Each year brings up the old querv 
why Bucknell has no real Alma Matei 
Song. With an entire song book to 
choose from, Bucknellians have never 
yet reached general agreement as to 
one which should be distinctively the 
"Alma Mater". 

The committee appointed a year ago 
by the Alumni Association to choose 
such a song was unable to do so, be- 
cause a matter of this kind cannot be 
decided by the vote of a few. It is 
only general approval by the Alumni 
and student-body which can give life 
to any song chosen. 

THE) ALUMNI MONTHLY pro- 
poses this year to make this possible. 
It plans to publish from month to 
month existing songs which seem to 
possess the qualities essential to such 
a choice. And later in the year we 
hope to be able to publish new songs 
offered by the poets and musicians 
among the Alumni and student-body. 

To be worthy of such a distinction, 
a song should, we believe, be at once 
dignified, noble in sentiment, and — sing- 
able. Several of our existing songs 
which are excellent from a purely musi- 
cal standpoint, fail to meet this last 
requirement, being too difficult of exe- 
cution for general singing. 

With the advice of Professor Stolz 
and other musicians, THE MONTHLY 
has chosen several songs which seem 
best to meet the conditions. It here- 
with summons all Bucknellians of a 
poetic mind to contribute their best. 

By this means it is hoped that the 
Alumni will be familiarized with the 
songs that are available, so that they 
may be able by spring to make an in- 
telligent choice. 

The songs will be submitted also to 
the student-body for their opinion, so 
that by Commencement time it should 
be possible to settle once for all this 
annoying uncertainty as to which is the 
real "Alma Mater". 



"Bucknell Jubilee Song" 

The first song to be submitted was 
written for the Jubilee Anniversary in 
1896. At that time it was set to music 
composed by Miss Juliet Aiken, of the 
School of Music, but since Miss Aiken's 
arrangement, though beautiful for solo 
singing, was not suitable for four-part 
harmony, the words were later set to 
the well-known music of Haydn. 

Whatever objection there might be to 
such an arrangement seems invalid in 
view of the fact that nearly all the 
Alma Mater songs of American colleges 
are set to familiar airs. 

Certainly this particular hymn, for 
such it really is, has nothing "popular" 
or "jazzy" in words or music, but the 
simple and dignified words blend with 
the grand old melody to produce an ef- 
fect worthy of careful consideration. 
® 

George West Stone, after serving 
many pastorates in Illinois, Iowa, Min- 
nesota, Wisconsin and Nebraska, moved 
to California, and is now living with 
his son, residing at 5963 Yucca Street, 
Holly W'ood, Los Angeles. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



COLLEGE OPENS 



THE PENN GAME 



The college doors swung wide on 
September 15 to welcome back an un- 
usually high proportion of the students 
of the upper classes, and to welcome a 
freshman class which on settling down 
after the hurlyburly of the opening 
days number two hundred and fifty. 
Including this class, the college student 
body numbers 760, while 177 are enroll- 
ed in the Music School. 

The new semester system was in- 
augurated with less confusion than was 
anticipated, and the large increase in 
the faculty in preparation for the new 
year relieves the worst of the over- 
crowding of sections. Some inconve- 
nience is caused by a lack of laboratory 
space to accommodate the large fresh- 
man sections in chemistry, but the 
Class-room congestion has been relieved 
liy the provision of fine new recitation 
rooms in the East Hall of the Academy. 
The large first floor room here has been 
equipped as a biological laboratory, 
and the second and third floors have 
been assigned to the English and Pub- 
lic Speaking work. 

The quality of the entering class 
seems good. It includes an unusually 
large number of secondary school honor 
students. As usual, their presence here 
is due largely to Alumni effort. In 
general, the year opened with a fine 
spirit visible on the part of both fac- 
ulty and student-body, and gives 
proinise of being most successful from 
all view-points. 

® ^ 

Hazelton Alumni Organize 

The Alumni of Hazleton and vicinity 
met shortly after Commencement at 
the home of Miss Nora Dodson, '11, to 
organize a local Alumni Club. Com- 
mittees were appointed to care for the 
various phases of organization and of- 
ficers were elected as follows:. President, 
.Joseph H. Cooke, '98; Secretary, Nora 
Dodson, '11. 

At a second meeting at the home of 
Roy Snyder, Miss Beatrice Fetterman 
was elected Vice-President, and a con- 
stitution and by-laws were adopted. 

At both meetings true Bucknell spirit 
prevailed, and the club is looking for- 
ward to a winter of splendid activity. 



THE NEW POLICY 



(Continued from Page One) 

able us to feature this department more 
than before. 

The third function was of necessity 
neglected last year. This year increased 
news space will permit it to be develop- 
ed. It is planned, therefore, to ruh an 
open forum for the expression of Alumni 
opinion on various questions of vital 
importance to the college. 

In short, it is our purpose to make 
the MONTHLY indispensable to any 
Bucknellian who is not content to re- 
main an ingnoramus in regard to his 
Alma Mater as it is today, and to shirk 
his clear responsibility toward the old 
college on the hill. 



Over-anxiety, resulting in heavy pen- 
alties and costly fumbles, robbed Buck- 
nell of victory at Franklin Field on 
October 2. Pennsylvania was extreme- 
ly lucky to score the single touchdown 




JOSEPH KOSTOS, 
Captain Varsity Football Team 

which made the score 7-0. It came by 
a trick pass after the Red and Blue 
had given up in despair the attempt 
to penetrate Bucknell's defense by 
stright football, and was the result 
of a fumble which gave Penn the ball 
within striking distance. And another 




WM. WILLMAN, 
Manager of Football Team 

fumble later in the game broke up the 
triumphant march of the Orange and 
Blue from mid-field toward a touch- 
down, giving the ball to Penn on her 
own ten-yard line. 

Thus despite the fact that Penn was 
reduced to a defensive game through- 
out the greater part of the afternoon, 
she was able to squeeze out a victory, 



though the Bucknell play, as brilliant 
as it was erratic, furnished most of the 
features of the game. 

Arda Bowser, '23, son of the Rev. 
A. B. Bowser, '88, of Ford City, was the 
particular bright star of the Bucknell 
offensive, tearing the Penn line to 
shreds time after time. Kostos, Mc- 
Graw and Mangan were not far be- 
hind the big fullback. And the line to 
a man was in the game hard, playing 
a defensive game that utterly smashed 
Penn's attack, and opening up big holes 
for the backs when the Orange and 
Blue had the ball. 

In the first quarter, after Bowser's 
kick-off, Penn at once resorted to a 
kicking game, which gave Bucknell the 
ball. Mangan and Bowser carried the 
ball for a first down, but a penalty 
brought the ball back and Kostos kick- 
ed. Penn, with the aid of penalties, got 
within scoring distance, and unveiled 
the famous Heisman shift, which was 
quickly abandoned after resulting in no 
gain. As a last resort, a forward pass 
was tried, which Bowser batted down. 
Bucknell tried to rush the ball, but al- 





C. E. GLASS, 
Graduate Manager 

most immediately fumbled, and Penn 
made some gains and was close to 
Bucknell's goal as the quarter ended. 
After failing to carry the ball the 
distance in three downs, in the second 
quarter Thomas called for a spread, and 
a pass right ovfer center deceived the 
Bucknell secondary defense, which was 
playing wide. Penn went wild as the 
touchdown was scored. 

A few minutes later Bucknell started 

down the field again, but lost the ball 

on downs. The remainder of the period 

was a punting duel with Penn having 

. the advantage. 

The third period saw Penn on the 
defense. Bowser gained much ground, 
which was lost again on penalties. 
Penn relied on kicking to keep the 
Bucknell attack out of the danger 
zone. 

In the fourth period the Orange and 
Blue unrolled its most consistent of- 
fensive of the game. From mid-field 
Kostos, Bowser, and Mangan carried 
the ball by gains of 7, 8 and 10 yards, 
to Penn's 12-yard line, where it was lost 
on a fumble, resulting from a bad 
pass. This was Bucknell's last chance, 
as Wray immediately punted out of 
danger, and the game soon ended. 
(Continued on Page 9) 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



Alumni Organizations 



ARE YOU IN TOUCH 

WITH YOUR LOCAL CLUB 



For the lienefit of last year's graduates 
who may not be informed of the 
various branch Alumni Clubs, we give 
the follo%ving list of officers of these or- 
ganizations. 

If you are in any of the vicinities 
mentioned, do not fail to get in touch 
with these men, in order not to be miss- 
ed when anything is doing. The Alum- 
ni Office sent out last spring to the 
various secretaries a list of the gradu- 
ates who e.xpected to settle in their 
districts, but so many changes of ad- 
dress have taken place since then that 
your local secretary may not be in pos- 
session of your present address. Don't 
fail to get your name on his mailing 
list. 

The Alumni Club of Philadelphia 

President, Dr. Samuel Bolton, 'So, 
4701 Leiper St. 

Secretary, Louis W. Robey, Esq., '01, 
918 Stephen Girard Bldg. 
The Alumni Club of New York City 

President, Rush H. Kress, '00, 225 W. 
86th St. 

Secretary, Creighton M. Konkle, '01, 
48 E. Hawthorne Ave., East Orange, 
N.J. 

The Alumni Club of Pittsburgh 

President, E. P. Griffiths, Esq., '04, 
1015 Union Bank Bldg. 

Secretary, John T. Shirley, '07, Car- 
negie. 

The Alumni Club of- Chicago 

President, W. C. MacNaul, '90, 6510 
Ellis Ave., Chicago, 111. 
■ Secretary, Fred H. Fahringer, '15, 
2902 91st St., Chicago, 111. 

The Alumni Club of Northeastern 
Pennsylvania 

President, James P. Harris, Esq., '12 
609 Coal Exchange Bldg., Wilkes-Barre. 

Secretary, Sidney Grabowski, Esq., 
'14, 417 Connell Bldg., Scranton. 
The Alumni Club of Harrisburg 

President, J. A. Tyson, '11, Kunkle 
Bldg. 

Secretary, W. C. Sprout, '08, % The 
Patriot, Harrisburg. 

The Alumni Club of Washington 

President, Henry H. Bliss, Esq., '70, 
Ouray Bldg. 

Secretary, Frank W. Tilley, '98, 1311 
21st St., N. W. 

The Alumni Club of Central 
Pennsylvania 

President, Judge Thomas J. Bald- 
ridge, ex-'95, Hollidaysburg 

Secretary, S. F. Forgeus, '72, D. D., 
Huntingdon. 

The Alumni Club of Williamsport 

President, Oliver J. Decker, Esq., '99, 
Trust Bldg. 

Secretary, Anne Galbraith, '07, % Wil- 
liamsport Grit. 



L 



ALUMNAE, HAVE YOU A 

FIFTY-FIFTY CLUB IN 

YOUR HOME? 



Some of the women's colleges en- 
courage among their alumnae mem- 
oership in the "50-50 Club". The 
first article in the constitution stipu- 
lates that an alumnae of the college 
who marries an alumnus of some 
ther college, goes 50-50 with him on 
their contributions to their colleges. 
When he gives SlOO to Harvard, she 
gives 8100 to Bryn Mawr. 

Of course, in case you have mar- 
ried a Bucknell man, the interpreta- 
tion of Article I would, we presume, 
entail your husliand's doubling his 
subscription. 



BUCKNELL BANQUET 

AT BUFFALO, N. Y. 



The Alumni Club of Lewisburg 

President Leroy T. Butler, '97. 
Secretary, Leo L. Rockwell, '07. 

The Alumni Club of Sunbury 

President, George Edward Deppen, 
Esq., '94. 

Secretary, CuUen Frazer Shipman, 
Esq., '99. 

The Alumni Club of California 

President, Allan G. Ritter, '09, 1012 
Black Bldg., Los Angeles. 

Secretary, Roy J. Farr, '08, 716 Mer- 
chants' Trust Bldg, Los Angeles. 

The Alumni Club of China 

President, Charles Way Harvey, '00, 
4 Quinsan Gardens, Y. M. C. A., Shang- 
hai. 

Secretary, Rev. Lewis C. Hylbert, '05, 
Ningpo. 

The Philadelphia Alumnae Club 

President, Helen Margaret Groff, '16, 
Washington, N. J. 

Secretary, Carrie McCaskie Wise, '06, 
123 Mill Road, Ashbourne, Pa. 

The Hazleton Alumni Club 

President, Rev. Joseph H. Cooke, '98. 
Secretary, Nora Dodson, '11, 90 N. 
Laurel St. 

The Wilmington Alumni Club 

President, Leslie W. Stout, '13, 
% Laird & Co. 

Secretary, Ruth Barthold, '17, % High 
School. 

The Cleveland Alumni Club 

President, Frank W. Stanton, '02, 
Society for Savings Bldg. 

Secretary, H. N. Cole, M. D., '06, 2729 
Lancashire Road, Cleveland Heights, 



® 

Mrs. Carl R. Crosby, formerly Leo- 
nora Shamp, is teaching Latin and 
French in the Falconer, N. Y., High 
School, and is active in the Women's 
Republican League, of Jamestown, 
N. Y. 



On Thursday, June 24th, over one 
hundred Alumni assembled in the V. 
M. C. A. at Buffalo, N. Y. They had 
been brought to the city by the North- 
ern Baptist Convention, and since this 
Convention was composed of represen- 
tatives from all the northern states, 
Buckneliians from the west and east 
were enabled to meet to renew college 
memories. The occasion offered an un- 
usual opportunity for a non-sectional 
gathering. 

The enthusiasm w'as strong. Presi- 
dent Hunt had so won the Alumni by 
his apt address at the early meeting 
that they were all ready to welcome 
him into the fellowship of -^Ima Mater. 
Besides, some men who knew the songs 
and could sing them, who knew the 
yells, and could give them, either by 
chance or by forethought, sat at one 
table, and they made every one aware 
that they had learned some things not 
found in the regular curriculum. Fur- 
ther in the Convention an attack had 
been made on the colleges; their value 
had been questioned; their professors 
had been charged with a sort of dis- 
loyalty to the principles for which at 
least denominational colleges should 
stand. These graduates wanted an op- 
portunity to express together their un- 
faltering conviction that the institu- 
tion that cared for them was indeed 
their Alma Mater. 

Dr. Dutton, '98, had some weeks be- 
fore the Convention completed all ar- 
rangements. Since he was Vice-Presi- 
dent of the Buffalo Committee on the 
arrangements for the Northern Bap- 
tist Convention, it was fitting that he 
should be the toastmaster. He caught 
the spirit of the gathering and kept 
alive the good fellowship and fun, 
though the thoughts of the hour were 
serious. Informal addresses were made 
by President Hunt, Dean Phillips, Presi- 
dent Milton G. Evans, Dr. Raymond 
M. West, Dr. Frank Goodchild and 
Mrs. O'Hara. All of the addresses for 
the most part reflected a spirit of con- 
fidence in the present and future posi- 
tion of the college. 

Several colleges banqueting at the 
same time sent greetings: As a result 
of this exchange a committee was ap- 
pointed from the Alumni of the col- 
leges to present some expression of 
their confidence in the work of the 
several colleges. Hazen, '99, was ap- 
pointed Bucknell's representative on 
this committee. 

Senator Tustin, whose election to the 
Presidency was' announced in a pre- 
vious issue, set aside his many duties 
at the Convention and honored the 
banquet with his presence. 



•■•"«•••-«•■•••«"«•• 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



In the Public Eye 



Christy Mathewson 

Holding His Own 



The latest word received by Lewis- 
burg relatives of Christy Mathewson, 
ex '02, indicates that he is holding his 
own, and apparently slowly improving. 
The results of the collapsing of the one 
lung seem to be favorable, and while 
his situation is still critical, the attend- 
ing physicians regard it as very hopeful. 
He is still at Saranac Lake, and Mrs. 
Mathewson is with him, giving him all 
possible care. 

Congressman Shreve, '84, 

on Official Tour 



Hon. Milton W. Shreve, congressman 
of Erie-Crawford County district, and 
chairman of the sub-committee on per- 
manent appropriations. House of Repre- 
sentatives, has been away from his 
home, Erie Pa., with Mrs. Shreve, on 
an official inspectmg congressional 
party, touring the U. S. possessions of 
the Pacific Ocean. They have travel- 
ed on a U. S. destroyer specially fitted 
for the comfort of the twenty persons 
selected for the trip. 



Judge Dickinson Presides 

at Bergdoll Trial 



Judge Oliver B. Dickinson, ex-79, 
presided at the trial of the mother of 
the draft dodgers and their associates 
in Philadelphia during September. His 
charge to the jury is characterized by 
the Public Ledger as profound and ex- 
haustive. He went into the intricacies 
of the crime of conspiracy, the weigh- 
ing of evidence and the duty of jurors 
in forming a judgment for 100,000,000 
Americans who form a public. 

Mulkie Honored 



The annual convention of the New 
York and Pennsylvania Association of 
Millers and Feed Dealers held at 
Jamestown, N. Y., July 30, elected Roy 
B. Mulkie, '98, of Union City, Pa., Vice 
President for a year. This is an ad- 
vancement for Mr. Mulkie who has 
been one of the directing heads of the 
association effort. He is also an official 
head of a retail coal dealers' association. 



Theiss, '02, Has New Book 



Lewis Edwin Theiss, '02, who with 
Mrs. Theiss and young daughter leads 
a happy life in experimental farm- 
ing and literary work at Muncy, has 
recently published his ninth book. 

"The Young Wireless Operator 
Afloat", is a story of the merchant ma- 
rine told in the manner which has made 



Mr. Theiss a favorite for boy readers. 
Mr. Theiss' books are not of the ordi- 
nary "juvenile" stamp, while dealing 
with material that appeals especially to 
the boy, they are written in a style 
which makes them quite worth while. 
His West Branch stories will remain 
classics of their kind. 

"The Young Wireless Operator 
Afloat" is published by the W. A. Wilde 
Company, of Boston, and illustrated by 
original photographs. 



Potter, '07, Solves 

Church Problem 



Hassrick Heads 



Legal Aid Bureau 



Romain C. Hassrick is Acting Chief 
of the Legal Aid Bureau established 
August 1 in Philadelphia under the 
control of the Department of Public 
Welfare. During the first week one 
hundred cases were brought in. 

In an interview with a representative 
of The Press, Mr. Hassrick said: "You 
don't realize how many ways of trim- 
ming the poor there are until you 
hear some of their stories. Every day 
it seems there is a new one, and we 
have done a lot to help redress wrongs 
in the little time the office, has been 
open". 

Dr. Batten, '85, on Strikes 



Dr. Samuel Zane Batten, in an inter-' 
view granted the Public Ledger of 
Philadelphia, in July, made some inter- 
esting comments on the famous report 
of the Interchurch Committee appoint- 
ed to investigate the steel strike. His 
statement, as published in the Public 
Ledger of July 30, is in part as follows: 

"Doctor Batten was interviewed at 
his office in the Roger Williams Build- 
ing, Seventeenth and Chestnut streets, 
in reference to the report that after a 
committee of the Interchurch World 
Movement had pronounced in favor of 
the strikers the opposition of certain 
capitalists to the publication of that 
report led to the withdrawal of their 
financial support and the collapse of 
the Interchurch World Movement. 

" 'It was unfortunate that the strike 
was lost, but it was inevitable'. Doc- 
tor Batten said. 'The special interests 
had access to the press, and by means 
of propaganda and appeals to prejudice 
they aroused public sentiment against 
the strikers, who were just in their de- 
mands'." 

Report Carefully Studied 

The report on the steel strike was 
very carefully studied by a representa- 
tive committee of church leaders, who 
liased their conclusions upon informa- 
tion received from both sides. The re- 
port shows the value of first-hand and 
disinterested study of these industrial 
questions. 



The Rev. Charles F. Potter, pastor 
of the West Side Unitarian Church, of 
New York, is working out a solution 
for many of the problems of modern 
city life in the erection of a single 
structure to accommodate church, of- 
fices and homes. 

With the support of the Board of 
Trustees of his church he is raising 
funds to build such a combination edi- 
fice at 110th St., near Broadway. It 
will cost $610,000. 

Mr. Potter characterizes the new plan 
as a protest against profiteering. In a 
recent interview he said: "With the ex- 
ception of food and merchandizing 
stores the new site will offer all the es- 
sentials for community life". The build- 
ing will be sixteen stories high, of brick, 
including the church proper, 50x100 
feet, seating 500 persons, the parish 
house. 60x100 feet, bowling alleys, club 
rooms, book stores, church school 
rooms, minister's office, a large social 
hall, and apartments furnishing homes 
for sixty families. A roof-garden for 
summer entertainments, and a kinder- 
garten are also planned for. 

Early in August $250,000 had been se- 
cured for the building, and it is expect- 
ed to obtain the balance this fall. 



Gress, '07, to Be 

First State Botanist 

E. M. Gress, '07, whose dissertation 
on "Grasses", which he presented recent- 
ly on taking his doctorate at the LTni- 
ersity of Pittsburgh, has been esteem- 
ed so important a contribution to his 
field that it is to be published by the 
state, has been named by State Secre- 
tary of Agriculture, Rasmussen, as 
Pennsylvania's first state botanist. He 
viU be attached to the Bureau of Plant 
Industry, and will have charge of all 
seed inspection work. 

Dr. Gress has been teaching for the 
past several years at Schenley High 
School of Pittsburgh. 



Jones, '06, Honored By 

Knights of Pythias 



Henry S. Jones, '06, Principal of the 
Plymouth, Pa., High School, was in- 
stalled August 19, as Grand Chancellor 
of the Knights of Pythias of Pennsyl- 
vania, embracing a membership of 60,- 
000. Prof. Jones was born in Plymouth. 
After completing his college work at 
Bucknell he returned there and has 
been for several years making his in- 
fluence felt in that section. He was 
■ especially active in various phases of 
war work. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



Tustin, '84, 



Addresses 
Lawyers of Nation 



PERSONALS 



Ernest L. Tustin, '84, addressed the 
American Bar Association at its an- 
nual meeting in St. Louis, in August, 
speaking very earnestly on the need 
for the establishment in all cities of 
municipal legal aid bureaus such as he 
has recently established in Philadelphia, 
of which we elsewhere give an account. 

He said in part, as reported by the 
Philadelphia Public Ledger, "The duty 
of the municipality to conduct a legal 
aid bureau is just as much a civic duty 
as cleaning streets and providing water. 
A bureau to investigate and defend im- 
positions upon the poor and ignorant, 
and to furnish a proper and rational de- 
fense for men, women, and children 
without means is just as much an obli- 
gation as to fill the office of district at- 
torney for the prosecution of crimes, or 
to provide a city solicitor to enforce 
health mandates and building restric- 
tions". 

Mr. Tustin's appeal was seconded by 
Charles E. Hughes, who declared "The 
legal aid society is the poor man's law- 
yer and gives him the essential as- 
sistance he cannot obtain elsewhere". 



Browning, '04, Has 

Big Mining Job 



p. D. Browning, '04, who got his 
start in the mining game with Profes- 
sor Lindemann in the City and Mine 
Surveying course down cellar in Main 
College, has been made Chief Mining 
Engineer of the Berwind-White Coal 
Mining Co. He was formerly stationed at 
Pittsburgh with the U. S. Bureau of 
Miiies. Mr. Browning entered upon his 
new duties August 1. 



Dr. Sprague' '97, Leaves Troy 



Dr. Thomas H. Sprague, for more 
than eight years pastor of the First 
Church, Troy, N. Y., has resigned to 
accept the unanimous call of the Em- 
manuel Church, Ridgewood, N. J. At 
the earnest request of the Church he 
will remain on his present field until 
October 15, in order to take charge of 
the 125th anniversary of the Church, 
which is to be celebrated October 10-15. 
A notable work has been done by the 
Troy Church, under Dr. Sprague's lead- 
ership, its aggressive spirit being indi- 
cated by its having oversubscribed its 
quota in the New World Movement 
campaign by several thousand dollars, 
its total being more than S31,000. At 
the present time it is making large im- 
provements to its Church property, 
which will cost $30,000, and will make 
its auditorium one of the most beauti- 
ful in the state. It is planned to have 
these improvements completed in time 
for the anniversary. The Emmanuel 
Church, Ridgewood, is one of the most 
attractive fields for service in the New 
York district. In the recent campaign 
it raised approximately S55,000. 

—Watchman-Examiner, July 22, 1920. 



1858 

The death of the Rev. John Morris 
Lyons, of the Class of 1S51, leaves the 
honor of being the oldest living gradu- 
ate an object of friendly rivalry be- 
tween Jesse Dean Cooper and Thomas 
Hart Benton Lewis, of the Class of 
1858. In the matter of actual age the 
palm seems to rest with Mr. Cooper, 
who was born March 1, 1831, while Mr. 
Lewis was born on Washington's Birth- 
day, 1835. Mr. Cooper interrupted his 
career as President of the Chapel Hill 
Academy in Tennessee to serve as Cap- 
tain in the Confederate Army during 
the Civil War, after which he resumed 
his position and remained in education- 
al work until 1868. Since then he has 
managed a cotton plantation at Center- 
ville, Alabama, of which he is the own- 
er. Mr. Lewis, after a long and hon- 
orable career as a lawyer in Wilkes- 
Barre, has retired, residing at 6S Car- 
lisle Street, Wilkes-Barre. He deliver- 
ed the oration at the Bucknell Com- 
mencement in 1861, and the Alumni ad- 
dress in 1874. He has twice been a 
member of the Pennsylvania House of 
Representatives. His grandson, Albert 
F. Lewis, was graduated from Bucknell 
in 1916. 

In the Presidtential year it is inter- 
esting to note that these oldest gradu- 
ates are both Presbyterians and Demo- 
crats. 

1860 
The Hon. William Lyon Nesbit and 
Dr. George R. Spratt, survivors of the 
College Class of 1860, renewed acquaint- 
ance in Lewisburg at Commencement 
time. Three members out of six liv- 
ing members of the Institute Class of 
1860 were present at Commencement, 
namely Mrs. Mary Bell Wi'son, Miss 
Lucy Bliss, Mrs. Elisha Shorkley. 
1861 
The many friends of Dr. Joseph K. 
Weaver will be rejoiced to hear that 
he is again in better health. 
1863 
Henry Flavel Grier, who was with 
"Fighting Bob" Evans when Henry H. 
Grier was wounded in the fight at Fort 
Fisher, off the North Carolina coast in 
1865, has just rounded out fifty years 
of residence in Chicago, having seen 
the city grow from a town of 250,000 
to a city of three million. He is Com- 
mander of the Farragut Naval Veteran 
Association and Vice President of the 
Central Asbestos and Magnesia Com- 
pany at 214 West Grand Ave., Chicago. 

1864 

N. M. Brooks who served as captain 
in the 12th New Jersey Volunteer In- 
fantry with the Army of the Potomac, 
and who lost his ,leg as the result of a 
gunshot wound in the campaign of 1861, 
resides at 224 A Street, S. E., Wash- 
ington, D. C. Mr. Brooks has served 
at various times as American delegate 
to the Universal Postal Congress at 
Vienna. Berne and Rome. 

Dr. T. A. K. Gessler, who served as 
a Private in CompanyA, Pennsylvania 
Volunteers, during the emergency of 
Lee's invasion in 1863, is the author of 
Metaphysical articles in the American 
adition of the Encyclopedia Britannica 



and a frequent contributor to religious 
periodicals. 

1865 
Dr. Clement Belton Lowe is at the 
present time devoting his full energies 
to his Professorship of Materia Medica 
at the Philadelphia College of Phar- 
macy and Science. 

Dr. Howard Fetzer King, who, in 
addition to being an alumnus of the 
college was one of the few graduates of 
the old Theological School of the L'ni- 
versity at Lewisburg, has been a pastor 
since 1870. 

1866 
Alonzo Hull is now residing at 103 
Thirtieth Avenue, South Seattle. 
Washington, having recently removed 
to that city from San Diego, Cal. 

1867 
Thomas Jones Philips is President of 
the Atglen National Bank. 

1868 
Dr. Leroy Stephens, who was slightly 
injured by the collapse of a platform 
at the Buffalo Convention in June, is 
perfectly restored to health, and is mov- 
ing about with his accustomed energy. 

1869 

The Monthly would be grateful for 
any information in regard to John W. 
Poler, of the Class of 1868. His last 
known address was Philadelphia. 

Edmund Wells, who served in the In- 
fantry and Signal Corps in the Army 
of the Potomac during the Civil War, 
and later held pastorates in Baptist 
Churches, and for some time taught 
Hebrew at Crozer, resides at Beaufort, 
S. C. 

1872 

John Ballentine, after almost fifty 
years of service in educational work, 
retired from the Vice Principalship of 
Clarion State Normal School July 1, 
1920, to go on the retired list of Penn- 
sylvania teachers. He will continue to 
reside in Clarion. 

1873 

John W. Hague, after over fifty years 
of service in the legal profession, retired 
because of an injury, and now resides at 
the National Soldier's Home in Ten- 
nessee. He served in the Heavy Ar- 
tillery and the Naval Brigade, also the 
Infantry during the war, and was pres- 
ent at Fredericksburg and the capture 
of Richmond. Mr. Hague is a Thirty- 
third Degree Mason. 

Dr. David Jane Hill is President of 
the National Association for Constitu- 
tional Government. 

1875 

John B. Weston, who retired from 
medical practice in 1913, has since been 
engaged in ranching at Heraet. Cali- 
fornia. He has been mayor of Hemet 
since 1914. 

Delazon P. Higgins is superintendent 
of the Citizens Electric Company of 
Lewisburg. 

1876 

James H. Wiley, ex-'76, is completing 
his twentv-sixth year in the Govern- 
ment printing office at Washington, 
having learned the printer's trade m 
the office of the Vine'.and, N. J., \yeekly, 
and later served on various big city 
papers He celebrated his sixty-sixth 
birthday September 1, 1920. Mr. Wiley 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



resides at 623J Fourth Street, N. W., 
Washington, D. C. 

Dr. James Mitchell Stewart, ex-'76, is 
a member of the staff of the Paterson, 
N. J., General Hospital. He received 
his Master's Degree from Bucknell in 
1905. 

William D. HoUiday, who has been 
in railway work in various positions 
since 1880, is at present Superintendent 
of the Lorain, Ashland and Southern 
Railroad, in charge of operations, traf- 
fic and purchases, residing at Lorain, 
Ohio. 

1877 
Information is desired by the Alumni 
Office in regard to Edmund Davis 
Shull, of the Class of 1877. 
1878 
Information is desired in regard to 
Darius A. Blose, of this class. 
1879 
Earl Milo Purdy, after a number of 
years as superintendent of factories in 
Pennsylvania, Georgia, West Virginia, 
and North Carolina, went to ranching 
in Montana, but soon returned to 
North Carolina, where he is treasurer 
and manager of the Statesville Wood 
Products Company, engaged in the 
rnanufacture of parlor, lounge and 
couch frames. Mr. Purdy writes, "I 
have only one regret, namely that I 
have not been able to give more at- 
tention to my Alma Mater. My heart 
has l)een there". 

1880 

Dr. Henry A. Griesemer is engaged 

in general denominational work for the 

Baptist Denomination, with residence 

at Nelmar Apartments, E 1, Baltimore. 

Thomas L, Lewis is pastor of the 

Palermo Baptist Church, Palermo, N. T- 

Edward W. Drinker, ex-'80, is freight 

claim agent for the L. & N. E., at 

Bethlehem, Pa. 

1883 
Adam Howard Beaver it a Doctor of 
Chiropractic at Trinidad, Colorado, re- 
siding at 409 Maple Street 
1884 
Information is desired by the Month- 
ly concerning Marshall George Smith. 
1885 
John Phillips Curring, of Steelton, 
while at Marion, Ohio, was the pastor 
of Senator Warren G. Harding. 

1887 

Edwin Paul this year completes his 
twenty-fifth year in the practice of law 
at Milton, Pa. 

Rev. William E. Straub, of Warren, 
Pa., is rapidly gaining a reputation for 
being one of the most active and suc- 
cessful Baptist pastors in Northwestern 
Pennsylvania. He is secretary of the 
Warren Rotary Club, and the Baptist 
field movements in the northwestern 
counties. At present, his chief effort is 
in obtaining for his growing congrega- 
tion, a new church home on the site of 
a large frame church now used adjoin- 
ing the Warren Y. M. C. A. 

1888 

Frederick Herbert Senft is Publica- 
tion Secretary and Editor of the Christ- 
ian Missionary Alliance at 690 Eighth 
Avenue, New York. 

Dr. Robert B, McDanel is in the third 



year of his pastorate at Martin's Ferrv, 
Ohio. 

Dr. James Albert Knowlton is now 
located at 1707 St. Mary's Ave., Fort 
Wayne, Indiana. 

George W. Hatch has recently re- 
moved to Mountainville, Pa. 
1891 
The Rev. Charles K. Newall is now 
pastor of the West Hoboken Baptist 
Church, residing at 87 Palisade Avenue, 
West Hoboken, N. J. 

Jacob H. Minick has recently retired 
from the cashiership of the Orrstown 
Bank, Orrstown, Pa. 

Dr. George E. Fisher has been ap- 
pointed Professor of Chemistry at 
Susquehanna University. He was form- 
erly Professor of Natural Science. 
1892 

The Rev. Walter B. Pimm is a mem- 
ber of the faculty at Broaddus Col- 
lege, Philippi, W. Va. 

Dr. Elkanah Hulley is President of 
Broaddus College at Philippi, W. Va. 
1893 
John H. Foresman is Secretary of 
the People's Building and Loan Asso- 
ciation of Williamsport, Pa, 
1894 
Mrs. Jessie Wheeler Armstrong, of 
Erie, has been energetic in furthering 
the work of the Erie Parent Teachers' 
Association and similar work of the 
state organization in Northwestern 
Pennsylvania. She was a teacher in the 
Erie high schools for a number of years 
after leaving a teaching position in 
Bucknell. Recently she entertained all 
the educational leaders and parents' 
association officials of Erie city at the 
Armstrong home. 

The Rev. George Henry Waid is 
Pastor of the Federated Baptist and 
Miethodist Episcopal Churches at 
Capac, Mich. 

Gilbert W. Maynard has been for 
twenty years a Christian Science healer 
and is at present a healer and reader. 
He resides at 604 Depot Street, Scran- 
ton, Pa. 

1895 

The Rev. Herbert Moxley Pease has 
recently accepted the pastorate of the 
Ca'.vary Baptist Church, of Bingham- 
ton, N. Y. 

Dr. Ezra Allen is Head of the De- 
partment of Biology at Ursinus College. 

1898 

Arthur Anson Smith is County Solici- 
tor for Lycoming County. 

Dr. Frank A. Colder is Professor of 
History at the State College in Wash- 
ington. 

The Alumni Office would be grateful 
for any information as to the present 
whereabouts of Paul Emil Weithaase. 

1899 

Dr. Edgar K Shumaker is Assistant 
Professor on the Eye at the Medical 
College and on the staff of the Graves 
Memorial Dispensary, the Los Angeles 
County Hospital and the White Me- 
morial Hospital in Los Angeles. 

The Rev. Howard Ira Stewart is pas- 
tor of the Mantua Baptist Church, of 
Philadelphia, residing at 649 N. 40th 
Street. 



Dr. George Stephen Tilley is in charge 
of the Puget Sound Oil Works in Seat- 
tle. His address is 99 Marion Street. 

The Rev. Howard Curtis Meserve .'s 
Minister at the Walnut Beach Union 
Chapel and the Woodmont Union 
Chapel and Head Librarian at the Tay- 
lor Library, of Milford, Conn. 

Dr. James L. Cattell is Associate Pro- 
fessor of French at Purdue Lfniversity. 

The Rev. John Emmett Calvin is 
Pastor of the Eden Baptist Church, 
Eden, N. Y. 

1900 

Thomas J. Morris is Western Adver- 
tising Manager for the Farmer Stock- 
man Publishing Company, with offices 
in the Steger-Building, Chicago. 

The Monthly desires information con- 
cerning Mr. and Mrs. Albert C. Hutch- 
inson. Mrs. Hutchinson was formerly 
Eliza Blair Bell, of the Class of 1900. 

Clarence A. Weymouth has recently 
returned from a business trip to Cuba. 
1901 

Dr. Thomas Evans is gynecologist at 
the Pittsburgh, and St. Margaret Hos- 
pitals, of Pittsburgh. 

The Rev. C. J. Pearse, who in college 
made the college record 10 seconds for 
the 100-yard dash, and 22 ft. 1 in. for 
the broad jump, has been since Septem- 
ber, 1919, pastor of the First Baptist 
Church, of Lorain, Ohio. 

The Rev. Chas. W. Wolfe, who is 
pastor of the Clayton, 111., Baptist 
Church, is making a large use of music 
m his work, and has been for several 
years the leader of the community or- 
chestra. 

1902 

Edward Burrowes and Mrs. Burrowes, 
formerly Helen Buoy, reside at 33 Wal- 
nut St., Milton Pa. Since 1918 Mr. 
Burrowes has been Employment Man- 
ager for the Milton Mfg. Co. 

George W. English has been since 
January 1, 1920, Vice President of S. 
G. Blowers & Co., with headquarters 
in Seattle. 

Dr. Willis E. Maneval is Assistant 
Professor of Botany at the University of 
Missouri, 

Information is desired by the Alumni 
Office in regard to Thomas Andrew 
Sherbondy, and Joseph Edward Millen. 

1903 

The Rev. Morton R, Sheldon is pastor 
of the First Baptist Church of Bu- 
cyrus, O,, having accepted this charge 
February 1, 1920, 

Jacob F. Sigel is director of the Pfister 
& Nogel Leather Co., residing at The 
Crescent, Phippsville, Northampton, 
England. 

Carl W. Tiffany has been since 1918 
President and Manager of the Reed 
City Woolen Mills, of Reed City, Mich. 

John A. Young is superintendent of 
schools at Westport, Conn. 

1904 

John C. Johnson, who has been with 
the Equitable Life Insurance Co., of 
Iowa, as General Agent for seven years, 
and who, starting the agency at Har- 
risliurg, in six years Iniilt it up into 
the third largest in the country, was 
promoted as General Agent for Detroit 
and Eastern Michigan in 1918, and in 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



the first year showed a 50% increase 
in business over any previous year. 

The encampment of the Pennsylvania 
National Guard at Mt. Gretna was 
this summer named Camp Fetzer in 
honor of the late Lt. Col. Fetzer. 

John E. Hunsberger is manager of 
the American Stores Co., of Philadel- 
phia. 

Mrs. Wm. S. Kuder, formerly Blanche 
Bane, has in press a volume of verse, 
"April Weather". 

Alif Stephens is an examiner with the 
War Department at Washington. 

Walter S. Wilcox is Sales Manager 
with the Richards Co., of Philadelphia, 
was in Lewisburg recently and took in 
the Varsity-Sub game on September 
25. Mrs. Wilcox, formerly Frances 
Scott, '02, was with him. 

1905 

Roy G, Bostwick and Mrs. Bostwick, 
formerly Marie Louise Leiser, spent 
their vacation in Lewisburg, early in 
September, visiting Mrs. Bostwick's 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. A. Leiser. 

Jessie D. McFarland ^has been since 
1918 a chemist in the Pennsylvania R. 
R. laboratories at Altoona. 

Robert D. Royer has been since April, 
1920, • Accountant with the Grocers' 
Cash Deposit Mutual Fire Insurance 
Co., residing at 208 Penn St., Hunting- 
don, Pa. 

John D. Smiley is President of the 
Poldi Steel Corporation of America. 

Harold W. Tiffany, who was last 
year at Hunter College as Professor of 
Geology, has accepted a Professorship 
of Chemistry at Delaware College, 
Newark, Del. 

1906 

Edith Anna Bailey, who last year 
held a fellowship in History at Smith 
College, goes this year to Wilson Col- 
lege as Professor of History and Eco- 
nomics. 

Frederick V. Follmer is an active 
member of the Rotary Club, of Milton. 

Dr. Harry B. Magee, ex- '06, is Roent- 
genologist at the R. A. Hanna Clinic 
and resides at 334 Crescent Ave., Peoria, 
111. 

Mary M. Moll is a teacher at the 
Millersvi'-le S. N. S. 

Dr. Hugo B. C. Riemer, who resides 
at 62 Winter St., Norwood, Mass., has 
offices at 220 Clarendon St., Boston, 
and is e.stablishing a wide reputation 
as a specialist on the eye. 

Dr. Penrose B. Shelley is engaged in 
medical practice at Port Royal, Pa. 

1907 

Wendell M. August is owner and 
manager of the Toby Coal Mining Co., 
at Brockwayville, Pa. He has three 
prospective students for a future day, 
Wendell M., Jr., Robert Edward, and 
Donald Dick. 

Clarence A. Bernhard, of Pittsburgh, 
also reports a future freshman, Jean 
Millicent, arrived March 15, 1920. 

Walter B. Brinker is manager of the 
A. H. Evans Coal Co., and resides at 
621 Franklin St., Keokuk, la. 

James Elliott, ex- '07, is owner of The 
Elliott Service Co., which was incor- 
porated in 1910. He resides in Pelham, 
N. Y. 



T. B. Hoy is entitled to a nice string'" 
of letters after his name. When all 
dressed up, he is B.S., M.S., 'LL.B , 
LL.M., J.D., Ph.D. Dr. Hoy is engaged 
in legal practice in New York. 

Calvin Oberdorf entered September 
1, 1920, upon his new duties as First 
Assistant Engineer of the Florida East 
Coast R. R. 

W. W. Raker is spending the year in 
graduate work at Columbia. 

1908 

John B. Boyer was principal of the 
Summer Normal School at Dalmatia, 
Pa. 

Mrs. J. Clarence Hershey, formerly 
Helen Forrest, has just removed from 
Denver to Chicago, where her address 
is 901 Lawrence Ave. 

Horace Brown King is in legal prac- 
tice at the Berger Bldg., HarrislDurg, 
specializing in Corporation Law. 

Dr. Casimir Perrier is engaged in 
dentistry at 84 Broad St., Pawtucket, 
R. I. 

James F. Sheehan is Junior Engineer 
with the U. S. Engineering Department 
with headquarters at 815 Witherspoon 
Bldg, Philadelphia. 

J. Harry Shoemaker is head of the 
English Department in the Trenton, 
N. J. High School. 

1909 

Milford S. Hallman was an instruc- 
tor at the Spearfish State Normal 
School, of South Dakota, during the 
summer session. 

Doncaster G. Humm entered this fall 
upon his work as principal of Madison 
School at Phoenix, Arizona. 

J. L. Landsrath, ex-'09, is a drafts- 
man with the Virginia Bridge and Iron 
Co. 

Charles A. Nyberg is an instructor 
in the Milwaukee Technical High 
School. 

Dr. Stanton R. Smith is Medical 
Director of the American Chain Co., at 
Bridgeport, Conn. He reports that to 
date he has kept out of jail. 

Eugene VanWhy is superintendent of 
the William L. Gilbert Home at Win- 
sted. Conn. 

Ralph G. Winegardner is Assistant 
General Manager of the Merchant Ship- 
building Co., of Chester, Pa. 

1910 

John C. Bank is Sales Engineer with 
the Bryan-Marsh National Lamp 
Works, with headquarters at 33 Union 
Square, New York City. 

Mrs. Edson J. Lawrence, former! 
Mait Cathrall, ex-'09, has charge of tl 
seventh grade and the music in tl e 
High School at Bloomfield, N. J. 

MacArthur Gorton is Sales Manager 
and Director of the Mills-Fox Baking 
Co., Detroit, Mich. 

John W. Halliwell is Treasurer and 
Manager of Brooks and McNeil, Inc., 
Insurance, Torrington, Conn. 

Phares G. Hertzog is head of the 
Science Department of Peddi Institute. 
This summer he was with the New 
Jersey Department of Agriculture as 
•Nursery Inspector. 

Dr. Richard N. Mackey is a surgeon 
in the U. S. Navy. 



Newton R. Quintin is an estimator 
with the President's Conference Cora- 
mission. 

Wesley Lee Sprout has resigned the 
principalship of Keystone Academy to 
join his father in the Handle and Ex- 
celsior Company, of Picture Rocks. 

George T. Street is Auditor with N. 
W. Ayer & Son, Philadelphia. 
1911 

Edward L. Howell is proprietor of 
Howell's Dyeing and Cleaning, North- 
umberland, Pa. 

Wendell W. Markle is representing 
the Concrete Steel Co., of New York 
City. 

Evelyn H. McCaskie is Secretary of 
the Board of Education, of East Orange, 
N.J. 

Nicholas W. Rosenberg is Assistant 
District Attorney of Fayette County, 
Pa. 

Earl Gladstone Watkins, ex-'lO, is 
Chief Engineer for the New River Coal 
Co., and resides at New Hope, W. Va. 

Wesley A. Wolfe is Construction 
Engineer with the Massillon Rolling 
Mill Co., residing at 16 Lincoln Ave., 
Massillon, O. 

1912 

Harry S. Bastian is Assistant Con- 
struction Engineer and Superintendent 
of Steam Plant Operation with the 
Portland Railway Light and Power Co., 
of Portland, Ore. 

Leon M. Crandell, ex-'12, is Assistant 
Chief Clerk in the ofiice of the Super- 
tendent, L. V. R. R., at Sayre, Pa. 

Walter S. Eisenmenger is Professor 
af Chemistry at Albright College. 

William W. Eister is Supervising 
Principal of Schools, of Hamburg Bor- 
ough, N. J. 

Richard D. Gettys is with the Humbe 
Oil and Refining Co., Houston, Texas, 

Frank R. Hean is District Secretary 
with the State Y. M. C. A., of Penn- 
sylvania, at Norristown. 

The Rev. Howard Johnson is Gen- 
eral Secretary of the Clark County, 
Ohio, Sunday School Association, resid- 
ing in Springfield. 

Robert W. Meyer is an Inspector for 
the Paterson, N. J., City Engineering 
Department. 

William H. Miller is principal of the 
Fall River, Mass., Grammar School. 
1913 

Helen K. Bartol has a fine position 
in the Tower Hill School at Wilming- 
ton, Del., as head of the Department 
of French. 

Henry H. Bliss, Jr., is a solicitor with 
H. H. Bliss, Washington, D. C. 

John Ralph is Philadelphia represen- 
tative of the Pittsburgh Bridge & Iron 
Works. 

John W. Bressler is Electrical Engi- 
neer with the Whitlock Cordage Co., of 
Jersey City. 

Howard M. Goehring is Assistant 
Water Service Engineer with the great 
Northern Railway at St. Paul, Min. 

Winifred A. Naylor is a teacher in 
the Niagara Falls, N. Y., High School. 
Robert L. Rooke is bond salesman for 
the Merrill Lynch Co., and has his resi- 
dence at 5 West 125th St., New York 
City. 

(Continued on Page 10) 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



•••"•"••^••' 



About the Hill 



'•"••■•"••••••I 



WITH THE FACULTY 



Professor H. T. Colestock was with 
the Radcliffe Chautauqua the entire 
summer. He delivered Americanization 
Lectures in seventy towns of the South 
and West. 

Professor and Mrs. C. A. Lindemann 
swung round the circuit in a ten 
thousand mile trip to the Coast, re- 
newing acquaintance with many Buck- 
nellians along the way. 

Assistant Professor H. S. Everett 
spent the summer quarter in graduate 
work at the University of Chicago. 

Dean and Mrs. Phillips spent the 

summer at their summer home in the 

Poconos. 

-X- ^- -::- 

Professor and Mrs. W. G. Owens 
started early in July for Japan, where 
they are attending the Sunday School 
Convention. 

Professors Wm. C. Bartol and M. L. 
Drum and their families were in their 
summer homes at Muncy nearly all 
summer. 

Professor G. F. Rassweiler was with 
the iladcliffe and Swarthmore Chau- 
tauquas. 

® 



REPRESENTATIVE 

UNDERGRADUATES 



THE DRIVE 



Dr. J. T. Judd, treasurer of the Uni- 
versity, reports a dull season during the 
summer in the Endowment Drive. The 
pledges now amount to $145,000, and 
payments are coming in. However, with 
the re-opening of the active campaign 
during the fall and winter a large in- 
crease in the pledges is expected. 

The first payment from the New 
World Movement has been made, and 
it is expected that regular monthly 
payments from this source will be ob- 
tained throughout the year. 

®; 

BORN 



To Mr. and Mrs. Albert J. Hamlin, 
September 20, 1920, a son. Frank. 

To Mr. and Mrs. John Jacob Hillsley, 
(Dorothy McClintic, '18), July 12, 
1920, twin sons, John Jacob, Jr., and 
Frederick Roland. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Edward O. Clark, 
(Mr. Clark, '15, Mrs. Clark formerly 
Eva Thayer, ex- '21), a son, August 22, 
1920. 

To Mr. and Mrs. R. S. Matlack (Mr. 
Matlack, '17, Mrs. Matlack, Margaret 
PhiUips, '18), August 30, a daughter, 
Margaret Mary. 

® 

THE NEW FACULTY MEMBERS 
Lack of space prevents our publish- 
ing in detail the names and prepara- 
tion of the newly appointed faculty 
members. We shall do this in the next 
issue. 



THE NEW SENIOR PRESIDENT 




Richard A. Mason 

The Senior Class this fall chose to 
lead the class and to guide Senior 
Council during the year, Richard A. 
Mason, of Boise, Idaho. 

Mr. Mason prepared for college at 
Boise High School, DeWitt Clinton 
High School, of New York, and Nau- 
gatuck High School, Conn. 




George J. B. Schuyler 

He entered Bucknell with the Class 
of 1919, but left in the spring of 1919 
to attend the first Officers' Training 
School. He was commissioned lieuten- 
ant in artillery, but transferred later 



to the lS6th Aero Squadron, where he 
served as aerial observer. 

In college has played class football 
and Varsity baseball, and is active in 
the Mechanical Engineering Society. 
He is a member of Kappa Sigma Fra- 
ternity. 

THE BUCKNELLIAN EDITOR 

George J. B. Schuyler, chosen this 
year as Bucknel'.ian editor, prepared at 
Williamsport High School. During the 
war he served in the Officjrs' Material 
School at Puget Sound Navy Yard. 

In college he has served since his 
freshman 'year on the Bucknellian 
staff, and last year was Assistant Edi- 
tor. He is president of the Press Club, 
and was Editor-in-Chief of the 1921 
L'Agenda. He is a member of Phi 
Gamma Delta Fraternity. 

(Note. — The Monthly will in this col- 
umn present to the .Alumni some repre- 
sentative men and women of the stu- 
dent body). 

® 

CAMPUS IMPROVEMENT 



During the summer extensive im- 
provements were made at the Women's 
Col'ege, adding greatly to the comfort 
of the dormitories there. 

The Academy classrooms were reno- 
vated in a way that makes them much 
more pleasant, and new rooms pro- 
vided in East Hall, as elsewhere an- 
nounced. 

A very large amount of new equip- 
ment was purchased, and several floors 
in the mens' dormitories fitted up with 
furnished rooms. 



HS>- 



THE PENN GAME 



(Continued from Page Three) 



made six first downs. 
80 yards on penalties, 



Each team 
Bucknell lost 
Penn 15. 

The game was viewed by 18,000 spec- 
tators, a record crowd for an early sea- 
son game on Franklin Field. Over 500 
of these were Bucknell rooters, the 
Philadelphia alumni being out in a 
l)ody, while a large student delegation 
from Lewisburg was on hand to back 
the team. 

Reynolds' men came out of the strug- 
gle without serious injuries, and while 
disappointed that they did not carry off 
a victory, are in good shape for the re- 
maining games of a heavy schedule. 

The Bucknell rooters, remembering 
that Reynolds had less than three 
weeks to whip his team into shape, and 
that it was the first game of the sea- 
son are confident that the next few 
weeks will suffice to poli.sh off the rough 
spots revealed by the Penn game, and 
give a mid-season team to rival the fiest 
in college history. 



10 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



^ 



PERSONALS 



(Continued from Page SI 

The Rev. Henry G. W. Smith is 
pastor of the Baptist Church at Green- 
ville, Pa. 

1914 

Walter T. Africa was made junior 
partner in Africa Brothers, Hardware 
Stores and Cutlery, June 1, 1920. 

Raymond L. Apgar is Electrical 
Draftsman for the City of Trenton, 
N. J. 

D. F. K. Bertolette is Principal of the 
Leesburg, N. J., High School. 

A Donald Gray is a landscape archi- 
tect located at 8120 Euclid Ave., Cleve- 
land, O. 

Frank Russell Hamblin returns to 
the University of Chicago as a gradu- 
ate student in the classics. 

The Rev. John E. Kauffman is pastor 
of the Christian Church at Piqua, O. 

Georse R. Madtes is te'.egraph editor 
of the Youngstown, O., Vindicator. 

Howard B. Musser is Scientific As- 
sistant in Grain Investigations for the 
^^ S. Department of Agriculture, at 
Washington. 

Fred O. Schnure is General Foreman 
of Electrical . Construction with th'i 
Bethlehem Steel Co., at Sparrows Point, 
Md. 

Alfred S. Van Osten is a member of 
the firm of Thos. C. Van Osten at 
Camden, N. J. 

Norman W.- Whited is an Assistant 
on the Engineer Corps with the Penn- 
sylvania R. R. at Cleveland, O. 

Karl W. Rippel is foreman with the 
Bethlehem Steel Co., at Sparrow's 
Point, Md. 

1915 

The Rev. Edward O. Clark, of Pit- 
man, N. J., conducted a very success- 
ful summer Bible School. 

Walter S. Grouse acted as Councillor 
at Camp Berkshire, Conn., this summer. 

Carl Edward Geiger was Director of 
Camp Keuka, Paul Smiths, N. Y., this 
year. 

Benjamin W. Laidlaw is a foreman 
with Thomas A. Edison, Inc., at West 
Orange, N. J. 

Clair Groover is a candidate for the 
Pennsylvania Legislature on the Demo- 
cratic ticket. 

Albert J. Hamlin is Sales Engineer 
with the Earle Gear and Machine Co., 
Philadelphia. 

Roland K. Hoke is owner of the Key- 
stone Electric Co., of Baltimore, Md. 

Willmon Keiser is Electrical Engi- 
neer with the Philadelphia & Reading 
Coal & Iron Co., at Pottsville. 

Harold R. Kelly is Vice President and 
General Manager of the Burwell Syndi- 
cate. He resides at Broken Arrow, 
Okla. 

Norman Mitterling is teaching 
Physics and Chemistry in the Union- 
town High School. 

Mrs. Willis C. Nugent, formerly Pearl 
Anna Graul, ex-'15, has been commis- 
sioned a missionary to Japan. 



Dwite H. Schaffner, who took his de- 
gree in law at Michigan this year, is 
with the law firm of Musser, Kimber, 
and Huffman, 503-9 Flatiron Bldg., 
Akron, O. 

Dr. George S. Stephenson is Assistant 
in Neuropathology at the Psychiatric 
Institute of New York, Ward's Island, 
N. Y. 

Dr. James L. Shoemaker, ex-'lo, who 
took his degree at Hahnemann in 1917, 
is now located at the Boyer Arcade 
Bldg., Norristown, Pa'. 

1916 

Bruce E. Butt is equipment man for 
the American Telephone and Tele- 
graph Co., at Harrisburg. 

Edgar C. Campbell is head of the 
Modern Language Department of the 
Danbury, Conn., High School. 

Samuel M. Davenport has resumed 
his studies in the Medical School of the 
L'niversity of Pennsylvania. 

Mary Ella Freed is Principal of the 
Whitpain High School. 

John J. DeHaven is teaching Mathe- 
matics in the Donora High School. 

Cyrus B. FoUmer entered the U. S. 
Consular Service in September. 

Carrie D. Foresman is Office Man- 
ager of the Peerless Laundry Co., of 
Lewisburg. 

Edwin C. Hageman is an engineer in 
the Physical Laboratories of the West- 
ern Electric Co., at New York. 

John F. Jeffery is Experimenter with 
the Erie City Iron Works, and teaches 
in the city night schools. 

Mary L. Jones begins her work this 
fall as teacher of Mathematics in the 
Greensburg, Pa., High School. 

Joseph E. Malin went this fall from 
the Germantown High School to the 
Swarthmore High School to teach Sci- 
ence. 

Elsie Martha Park has given up the 
Principalship of the Westwood Borough 
Public Schools to enter departmental 
work in the Carnegie Schools. 

1917 

Meredith L. Abbott has been made a 
partner in J. T. Abbott & Son, General 
Merchandise, Glassboro, N. J. 

Francis J. Beckley is Cost Account- 
ant Clerk with the Susquehanna Col- 
lieries Co., at Nanticoke, Pa. 

Paul W. Boggess is Assistant Princi- 
pal of the Frackville, Pa., High School. 

Anna Downing is teaching this year 
in the Forty Fort High School. 

Charles H. W. Fisher is Supervising 
Principal of Schools at Northumber- 
land, Pa. 

Anna E. Hankins is Supervising Prin- 
cipal of the Rockledge, Pa., School. 

Alice Haslam is Assistant Head 
Worker of Neighborhood House for the 
New Jersey Zinc Co., at Palmerton, Pa. 

Donald A. Haman began on July 1 
his duties as Inspection Engineer with 
the Western Electric in New York City. 

Clarence M. Kriner is now a sales- 
man with the Landis Tool Co., at 
Waynesboro, Pa. 

1918 

Hayes Frank Caldwell is part owner 
of the Vanatta Hardware Co., of Eric, 
Pa. 



Elizabeth B. Champion is stenogra- 
pher with the Engineering Extension 
Division of The Pennsylvania State 
College. 

Dagmar James is in the Educational 
Editorial Department of The MacMil- 
lan Company, in New York. 

Mary DeWees is Superintendent of 
the Arkansas State Reformatory for 
Women. ?' 

Merrill F, Feairheller is a teller in 
the Wiiliamsport National Bank. 

Karl K. HuUey is now Registrar of 
Broaddus College, Philippi, W. Va. 

Charles A. Kissell is Supervising Prin- 
cipal of Schools at Duncannon, Pa. 

Earl P. Raub is a chemist with the 
DuPonts at Arlington, N. J. 

Allen S. Reddig began work this fall 
as Principal of the Glassboro, N. J., 
High School. 

Samuel J. Smith is in the Industrial 
Engineering Department of the Jones 
& Laughlin Steel Co., Beaver, Pa. 

1919 

Russell Hedge has acepted a posi- 
tion as salesman with A. B. Condon &: 
Co., and resides at 2731 Franklin St., 
Denver, Col. 

James R. Russell began work in 
August as a clerk in the Actuary De- 
partment of the Metropolitan Life In- 
surance Co., of New York. 

Charles B. Kreitner is this year Prin- 
cipal of the Briston High School at 
Lakewood, Pa. 

Chester R. Leaber will be travelling 
in the Far East during the next five 
years for the International Banking 
Corporation of New York. Mail ad- 
dressed to him at .53 Ross St., Wii- 
liamsport, Pa., will be forwarded. 

Charles W. Mitchell is Principal of 
the Sheffield, Pa., High School. 

Thomas M. Orchard has been since 
August with the Hygrade Lamp Co., of 
Salem, Mass., learning the business. 

Elizabeth F. Spyker has begun her 
work as Science Teacher in the Clear- 
field, Pa., High School. 

Annette A. Stahl is teaching Eng- 
lish in the Narberth High School. 

Emma Irene Yarnall spent the sum- 
mer as Recreational Leader at Shadow 
Brook Y. W. C. A. Camp, Cornwall 
Bridge, Conn., and began work in Sep- 
tember in the Cresson Schools. 

1920 

The Monthly plans in the next is- 
sue to feature a story on the present 
whereabouts of the 1920 class. So please 
give an account of yourself when you 
send your dues to the Treasurer of the 
Alumni .Association. Please be prompt, 
in order that we may have the account 
as full as possible. 



MAY AND JULY ISSUES 
ON HAND 



The Alumni Office has on han(l a 
number of copies of the May issue 
of last year with Dean Phillips' ap- 
preciation of Professor Perrine, and 
the July issue, with the story of 
Commencement. These will be sent 
to any Alumnus on request. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



11 



Didlcali-'d tu PrusldL-at Harris. 

Fr-om Bucknell Jubilee Song 

Sung at the JiibiUn Aimivciaanj, iHillS. 



MARY BARTOL-THEISS, 94 



H.VYDX. 




1. Throned up - on thy 

2. In the days of 

3. From a - far the 



sto-ried hill-top, Ga - zing toward the morn - ing star, 
hope and cour-age. Came we with a moth -erspraye 
homeward sea-man, On the blue Ae - ge 



tide 





Wave and wood-land, vale and moun-tain, 
To thy tern-pled groves in - vit - ing, 
Hailed the gleam-ing 



crest of Pal -las, 



Smi-ling on thee 
Hearts ex - pect - ant. 
Hailed the god-dess 



from a - far, 
free from care, 
of his pride j 






Hearts of ours and 
Here we gird - ed 
Bow to thee, all 



songs of morn-ing, 
for life's bat -tie, 
cth - ers scorn-ing, 



Al - ma 
Al - ma 
Al - ma 



T 

Ma - ter. 
Ma - ter, 
Ma - ter, 



Ma - ter mine. 
Ma - ter mine. 
Ma - ter mine. 




12 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



PRESIDENT HUNTS 

STRENUOUS SUMMER 



had been a member of the Philadel- 
phia Stock Exchange for nearly fifty 
years, died July 17. 



President Emory W. Hunt was 
placed by the Northern Baptist Con- 
vention at its June meeting in a posi- 
tion of high honor and graye respon- 
sil)ility. He was chosen one of two 
delegates to represent the Northern 
Baptists at the International Baptist 
Conference in London, . held in mid- 
summer to consider the world prob- 
lems confronting the denomination. 

With Dr. James H. Franklin, Dr. 
Hunt sailed early in July for London. 
After important conferences there, the 
two undertook a strenuous trip through 
Western Europe. Brief visits were paid 
France, Germany, Denmark, Norway, 
and Sweden. 

Speaking of the earnest and busy 
nature of the trip, Dr. Hunt said re- 
cently: "Some of you will realize how 
i)usy those days were when I tell you 
that my hotel was within a block of 
the British Museum, and I never en- 
t?red it for an hour; an<3 that every 
day in Paris I passed the Louvre with- 
out once pausing even for a brief visit". 

One afternoon in Paris Dr. Hunt did 
take off to visit Chateau Thierry, and 
in a recent chapel talk he held his 
audience breathless as he described how 
there he found one single American 
so'dier left who turned out to be a 
former member of Ambulance LInit 524. 
Those who heard him will not soon for- 
get his portrayal of that afternoon's 
t"-'ir under the guidance of that single 
American. 

Both delegates brought back with 
them a firm conviction of the very 
great need of Europe, and the respon- 
sibility of Christian America to help 
in every way in its power toward the 
recovery of those war-torn lands. 

Of the value of President Hunt's 
work Dr. Frank'.in speaks thus in the 
Watchman-Examiner: "Of course it 
was a genuine pleasure to be associated 
with Dr. Hunt on this journey. He 
rendered service of very great value 
wherever he went, and his warm heart- 
beat was felt everywhere". 



-<iy- 



DEATHS 



Edna Miller Rice, '14 

Edna Miller Rice, '14, wife of Pro- 
fessor John W. Rice, of the coUege, 
died August 30, at the Williamsport 
Private Hospital. The entire community 
was shocked at the death of Mrs. Rice, 
who, though she had been in a serious 
condition for some time, was thought 
to be improving. She leaves two small 
children. The Alumni will join the en- 
tire college in sympathy to Professor 
Rice in his bereavement. 



Leon Noll, '18 
Leon Noll, '18, a graduate in Elec- 
trical Engineering, of the class of 1918, 
was electrocuted at his work at Eldo- 
rado, Kansas, Sept. .3. Interment was 
made in Mifflinburg. 

William G. Hopper 

William G. Hopper, an uncle of H. 

Boardrnan Hopper, of the Board of 

Trustees, and senior member of the 

firm of William G. Hopper & Co., who 



M. Luther Ross, '99 
Dr. M. Luther Ross, of the Class of 
1S99, died at his home in Coatesville, 
September 17, 1920. After graduation 
from Bucknell he entered University 
of Pennsylvania Medical School and 
graduated in 1902. He practiced medi- 
cine in New Castle, Pa., and Kylor, Pa. 



Lillian Shields Barton 
Lillian Shields Barton, wife of Dr. 
Amos E. Barton, '06, and a sister of Dr. 
Leigh Shields, '08, Charlotte Shields, '03, 
and Dr. Edgar Shields, '01, died sud- 
denly of heart failure, October 4, at 
her home in Brooklyn. Interment was 
made at Lewisburg, October 7. 

Mrs. Barton's death was very sud- 
den and caused a great shock to the 
many friends in Lewisburg who re- 
membered her from former days. At 
the time of her death she was enter- 
taining Mrs. L. C. Hylbert, formerly 
Margaret Runyan, '02. 



Ralph Montgomery Strawbridge, '85 
Ralph Montgomerv Strawbridge, Esq., 
of the Class of ISS5, of Pittsburgh, died 
July 5, and was buried in Lewisburg. 
He was survived by a widow, formerly 
Margarette W. Kremer, of Lewisburg. 
For many years Mr. Strawbridge had 
1)een engaged in the practice of law in 
Pittsburgh. 

® 

WEDDINGS 



Bressler-Johnson 

Miss Oslig Johnson, of Jamestown, 
N. Y., and John W. Bressler, of the 
Class of 1913, were married August 9 
at Boston, Mass. They will make their 
home in Jersey City, at Summit View 
Apartments, 25 Jones St. 
* -X- v^ 
Heiter-Wolfe 

Miss Ethel Isabel Wolfe, daughter of 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Gundy Wolfe, of 

Lewisburg, and Oliver A. Heiter, ex-'19, 

.were married September 2 at the home 

of Mr. and Mrs. J. P. S. Strickler. 

Mr. Heiter is a veteran of the World 
War, having gone out with Troop M. 

Schuyler-Harner 

A popular faculty wedding was that 
of Professor William H. Schuyler, '1.5, 
to Miss Mary Arbutus Harner, at the 
home of the bride in E'.kton, Virginia, 
August 31. 

Lacey-Rainey 

Miss Rose Rainey, formerly of the 
Domestic Science faculty, surprised her 
many friends with the announcement 
of her marriage to Mr. Raymond Henry 
Lacey, at the home of her parents, in 
Tunkhannock, Pa., August 21. The Rev. 
James Rainey, her father, is a gradu- 
ate of the Class of 1871. 

Lewis-Gnilka 

Miss Edith J. Gnilka. of Milton, was 
married to Mr. Willard J. Lewis, '20, 
at a pretty wedding at the home of the 
Rev. W. J. Peacock. After the cere- 
mony a reception was held at the home 
of Mr. and Mrs. George B. Fox, of 



Milton, uncle and aunt of Mrs. Lewis. 
Mr. and Mrs. Lewis will reside in Con- 
nellviile, where Mr. Lewis will teach 
this year. 

Gilbert-Thompson 

Miss Dorothy Marie Thompson, of 
the Class of 1919, was married to Mr. 
Eugene Irving Gilbert, a graduate of 
the University of Pennsylvania, of the 
Class of 191.5, July 27, 1920. They re- 
side at the Athens, Ardmore, Pa. 

Musser-Benfer 

Miss Dorothy Louise Benfer, daughter 
of the Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Henry A. 
Benfer, of York, and Malcolm Musser, 
of the Class of 1918, were married July 
25 at the St. Paul's Evangelical Church 
of York. They reside at Salem, N. J., 
where Mr. Musser is Physical Director 
of the Y. M. C. A. 

Stevenson-Patterson 

Miss Amy Louise Patterson, '16, and 
Dr. George S. Stevenson, '15, were mar- 
ried September 2, and are at home at 
162 Howard Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Enberg-Jordan 

Miss Mildred Jordan, School of 
Music, '17, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
William G. Jordan, of Athens, Pa., was 
married to Mr. H. Winfield Enberg, of 
Athens, in the First Presbyterian 
Church, Athens, Pa., September 11. 
They will reside in Athens. 

Sprout-Hahn 

Miss Louise Hahn, '18, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. John Grant Mahn, of 
Meshoppen, was married to Mr. Clinton 
Irvine Sprout, '17, at the home of her 
parents, September 4. Among the 
Bucknellians in attendance were Rev. 
Charles Tilton, Mr. and Mrs. G. G. 
Painter, Misses Marjorie Sprout, Martha 
Leiser, Jessie Potts, Mildred Jordan, and 
Madonna Harris, and Messrs. Don 
Sprout and Lee Sprout. 

-X- ^' # 

Titterington-Park 

Miss Sara Asenath Park, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. William Butler Park, 
of Ben Avon, was married September 
15 to Mr. John Clyde Titterington. 
They will be at home after October 
15 at 176 Ridge Ave., Ben Avon. 

Cooper-Hardy 
Raymond M. Cooper, ex-'lS, was mar- 
ried August 17, 1920, to Miss Helen K. 
Hardy, a graduate of Tufts College, of 
the Class of 1919. 



L 



Purpose-Matrimony 

Why not? You who are contem- 
plating matrimony, put the 
MONTHLY on your list for an an- 
nouncement, and ensure a prompt 
and accurate report of the event. 



Hoblitzell-McGann 

Evelyn McGann, 1918, was married 
May 20, 1920, to Mr. H. Duff Hob- 
litzell. 

Stein-Frick 

Miss Helen L. Frick, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. H. R. Frick, was married to 
Mr. Paul Stein, ex-'13, at the First 
Presbyteria.i Church, of Milton, Sept 
VS'i They will make their home in 
Akron, O. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



13 



STEirSIINGER CAF^E 

Open 6 a. m. to 1.30 a. m. 

Rooms With Hot and Cold Running Water 

3rd and Market St. GEO. E.IRVIN, Mgr. Lewisburg, Pa. 



Teachers for 

Schools 



Schools for 
Teachers 



NATIONAL TEACHERS' AGENCY, Inc. 

D. H. Cook, Mgr., 326-27-28 Perry BIdg., 1530 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
"I HAVE PROMOTED OVER 15,000 TEACHERS. WHY NOT YOU?"— D. H. Cook. 

Bucknell Graduates Wanted. Have Placed Hundreds of Them 



Jolin F. WinkelUech, "14 
Invest in a Farm! 

E. A. STROUT FARM AGENCY 
Knows the Good Ones, 
Advertises and Sells Them. 
Phone 113R8 Lewisburg, Pa. 

Ralph L. Belford, '05 

Attorney-at-Law 

Milton, Pa. 



This space is paid for by TWO 
BOOSTERS who do not wish 
their names to be announced. 



G. F. RASSWEILER 

Professor of Public Speaking, 
BUCKNELL UNIV. 

Dramatic Reader, Lecturer, and 
Entertainer. For Dates and Terms, 
address 106 S. 7th St., Lewisburg. 
Phone 238-R-2. 



MOORE BUILDING 
SUPPLY CO. 

Milton, Pa. 

Distributor.s of 

All Kinds of Building 
Material 

Agents for 

Johns-Manville Co. 



BUCKINEUL UINIVERSITV 

EMORY W. HUNT, D. D., LL. D., PRESIDENT 

Alumni : Help us maintain and increase a waiting list of applicants for admission by filling 
out the blanks below: 



B. F. Thomas, Registrar. 

Dear Sir: — ■ 

The following are prospective 
college students of the first rank and 
should be on Bucknell's roll next fall. 
I recommend them on the basis of 
scholarship and leadership. 



Signed 



B. F. Thomas, Registrar. 
Dear Sir: — ■ 

Please send information about 
.: .Arts Courses 
. . .Preparation for Ministry 
...Preparation for Teaching 
...Preparation for Law 
...Preparation for Medicine 
...Preparation for Business 
...Preparation for Social Work 
. . . Mechanical Engineering 
. . . Electrical Engineering 
. . . Civil Engineering 
. . . Chemical Engineering 
.. .Science Courses 
. . .School of Music 
. . .General Catalog 
. . .Campus Views 
. . .Expenses 
...Application for Admission 

To 



Signed 



Established, 1892 
First Instruction, 1853 



BUCKNELL UNIVERSITY 



11 Teachers 
177 Pupils 



THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

Emory W. Hunt, Pres. 
Paul G. Stolz, '08, Director 

Graduates of the Stipervisor's Course are granted without examination Prox'isional 
nent Certificates to Teach by the State Department of Education 



COURSES: 



Piano, 4 yrs. 

Pipe Organ, 4 yrs. 
Violin, 4 yrs. 



Violincello, 4 yrs. Voice, 4 yrs. 

Contrabass, 4 yrs. Teachers' Course, 4 yrs. 
Viola Harmony, 

Theory. 



erma- 



Orchestm 
HLstory 
Oratorio 
Opera 



14 



These Lewisburg Firms Support the Monthly ; Patronize Them. 



COLLEGE IIVK 



Inseparably Linked With Life "On the Hill" 
GOOD EATS AND GOOD TIMES, THE LAW AND PROPHETS OF OUR MENU 



"ON THE QUADRANGLE" 



PAYNE, '09 



Lew^isburg Trust 
and Safe Deposit Co, 

Commenced Business 1907. 

CAPITAL $125,000 

SURPLUS AND PROFITS, 87,000 
DEPOSITS 1,025,000 

Your Business 
Solicited, 

Appreciated, 

and Protected 

DANIEL F. GREEN, Treas. 

Renew Your Acquaintance With 
"The Purity Special" Sundae. 

Take home with you a box of our 
HOMEIVIADE CANDY. 

THE PURITY 
W. A. BLAIR 

FRESH AND SMOKED MEATS 

"Wholesaler of Pork, Sausage, etc. 

Fancy and Staple Groceries 

OYSTERS IN SEASON. 



J. FRED ZELLER 

J EWELER and 
OPTOMETRIST 

J. C. REEDY 

Dealer In 

rurniture ana Carpets 

530 Market Street 

THE 

SHIELDS 

Photographic 
Studio 

Distinctive Stationery 

AT 

BAKER'S PHARMACY 



DELMAR INN 



A. J. DUNKLE, Prop. 



WAIN I ES 

Opposite the Trust Co. 
The Home of 

HOMEMADE ICE CREAM 
Lunchenette and Parlor 

"GRADS". Your Mail Orders for 

Bucknell or Fraternity Felt and 

Leather Goods will receive onr 

Prompt and Careful .'Mtention. 

H. F. DONEHOWER 

"Varsity Outfitter" 

W. L. DONEHOWER, '06, Mgr. 

JAS. P. BENNETT 

Local and 
Long Distance Haulino- 



Phone 84 



Lew/isburg 



University Book 
Store 

Books, Stationery 

and School Supplies 

Mail Orders Promptly 
Attended to 

We Pay Postage 

WE WANT YOUR HIRTS 

Mail 'em in 
Peerless Laundry 

Thompson, '04. Donehower, '06 

Milton Lewisburg Sunbury 

E. C. NOLL 

THE 
FEED MAN 

DR. E. S. HEISER 

DRUGGIST 
Developing and Printing 



IREY'S 
SHOE STORE 

A. J. Irey, '79. 



Union National Bank 

Strong Capital and Surplus 

Government Supervision 

Member Federal Reserve 



Employees Acquainted with 
Business and College World. 



SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES 

SAVINGS DEPARTMENT 

TRAVELERS' CHECKS 



John K. Kremer, Cashier. 

RAEZER'S 

Liasn and Carry Groceries 
Lewisburg and Milton. 

H. J. Nogel & Bro. 

Jeweler and Optomeirist 
Le-wisburg, Pennsylvania 

Engraving Watch Repairing 

GRENOBLE BROS. 

University Jewelers 

Exclusive Columbia Agents 

J. A. FEGLEY 

Newspapers, Magazines 

Cigars, Tobacco, 

Stationery. 

Herman & Leiser 

Dry Goods, Notions, and 

Ladies' Ready-to-Wear 

Apparel. 



W. C. Walls, 
Pres. 



John W. Bucher, 

Cash. 



The Lewisburg National Bank 

The oldest Bank in Union County. 
Established IS.5.3. Capital SIOO.OOO. 
Surplus and Profits 8100,000. 3'''r In- 
terest paid on Savings .\ccounts. 

HILL'S DRUG STORES 

2 Stores 2 
Lewisburg, Penna. 



Transact Your Business In Lewisburg Through Our Advertisers. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



15 



OPPORTUNITIES 



TO YOU 



We love to see 
Your name 

Resplendent in a MONTHLY 

Personal. 
We long to tell the world 
All you have done 
To bring renown and fame 
To Old Bucknell; 

And publish forth your mon- 
aker 

In "In the Public Eye." 

How we rejoice 

To see your noble cognomen 

Listed 'mong those whose 
deeds shine forth 

In Dr. Judd's Endowment 
Honor Roll! 

Or lending lustre to the 
length'ning scroll 

Compiled by Brother Glass. 

But, O! these joys grow dim 

Beside the burning great de- 
sire 

With which we yearn — we 
burn 

To see your noble signature 

Subscribed to a bank-check 

In payment of an Annual 
Membership. 



( 

THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATIOM NEEDS ONE 


THOUSAND MEMBERS. FILL OUT THIS 


COUPON AND SEND TO THE 


TREASURER 


F. M. Simpson, Treas., 


The Alumni Association, , 


Bucknell University, 


Lewisburg, Pa. 


Enclosed find $ , to cover Alumni Associa- 


tion membership as indicated by check mark below: 


Annual Membership for 1920-21 $2.50 


(Including Alumni Monthly) 


Life Membership 25.00 


Name Class 


Address . 


i 



ALUMNI NEWS ITEM 



Class... 

Name 

Item: 



.19 



Reported by. 



FOR BUqKNELL UNIVERSITY 

In consideration of other pledges to the 1920 Funds 
of One Million Dollars for endowment, and Five Hun- 
dred Thousand Dollars for equipment, I hereby sub- 
scribe and promise to pay 

Dollars 

each year for five years, beginning 1920 

Signed 

Address 

Dated 1920 

Payable to JOHN T. JUDD, Treasurer, Lewisburg, Pa. 

Payments may be made in Bonds, Mortgages, 

Stocks and Notes 



L 



16 BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 

Ine Alumni Business and Professional 

Directory 

Ijear I-'ellow Alumnus: — 

The Bucknell Alumni Monthly wishes to tifCer you the best of service tlirough its advertising columns. 
We present for your consideration a page of advertisements of the business men of Lewisburg. You will find 
among them many acciuaintances of college days. Patronize them whenever possible for they are consistent sup- 
porters of Bucknell interests. Th -n tliere are advertisements of business interests throughout the state 
whose propositions demand your attention and your trade. When you se? them and when you do buainers with 
them mention that relations were established through the columns of the Monthly. Thus we shall have a 
trian.gle of mutual support and good will. 

But the feature of our plans is the establishment of a thorough-go'ng Alumni Business and Professional Di- 
rectory. We are p'anning to insert cards one column wide and one inch deep setting forth as simply as possible 
the profession or business of the advertiser. Our hope is that such special Alumni service will be invaluable to 
the readers as well as to the advertiser. This field of mutual cooperation is actually unlimited in extent and 
strength and spirit. Let us quote from a recent communication of an Alumnus: "From February, 1919, to De- 
cember, 1920, I have built 47 houses in Pittsburgh and have bought 14 cars of rough lumber from , Buck- 
nell, and 4 cars roofing slate from . Bucknell." Would he not gladly buy of other Bucknell men if he 

knew of their business? And wou'.d you not be glad to sell to him? The obvious medium for real cooperation 
is The Bucknell Alumni Monthly. Can you think of a superior complement to Bucknell brotherhood than this 
service with its opportunities for daily business? Cooperation backed up by Bucknell fellowship is an organiza- 
tion that cannot be downed. 

If you are the head, a partner, or an officer of a business firm which appeals to more than a local trade 
insert a card and include the names of Bucknellians associated with the firm. If you are a consulting engineer, 
an insurance representative, an accountant, a manufacturer, a banker, a broker, a contractor, insert a card set- 
ting forth the service you offer Bucknellians. 

If you are a lawyer, use such a card to announce the type of service you are able to offer those who may 
have legal business in your district. If you are a pastor insert a card of welcome to out-of-town Bucknellians 
who happen to visit your city. If you are of the medical profession employ this dignified announcement of 
your specialty for the benefit of fellow-Bucknellians. With the extension of the territory in which they op- 
erate, and with the growth of the national activities of these professions, members of these professions find it 
increasingly difficult to withhold advertisements on the basis of professional ethics. 

If you are a teacher and desire to consider a change of location can you do better than to indicate your 
specialty and make known your availability either through the advertising columns of the Monthly or through 
the teachers' agencies advertised in the same columns? If you are a principal or superintendent looking for an 
A-1 teacher use the same media. The 700 Bucknellians engaged in educational work will be all the stronger for 
cooperation. Include j'our favorite teachers' agency in the combine. 

We are altogether confident that the proposed card service of the Alumni Business and Professional Di- 
rectory will be an invigorating success all around. With your cooperation we can guarantee results a-plenty. 
Send us your card now. 

Yours for success, 

THE BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



ADVERTISING RATES 

One Insertion 4 Times 8 Times 

: inch deep, 1 column: '. $1.00 $3.50 • $6.50 

1 inch deep, 3 columns: 3.00 10.00 18.00 

% page 6.00 22.50 42.00 

% page 9.00 33.00 62.50 

Full page 15.00 ■ 57.50 110.00 

2'/( discount for cash within 30 days. Copy due first of each month. 

2,100 Circulation last year. 

Send your ad. to 

H. S. EVERETT, Advertising Mgr., 

Lewisburg, Pa. 



Bucknell Alumni Monthly 



Vol. V 



Lewisburg, Pa., November, 1920 



No. 2 




LOOKING BACKWARD— THE VARSITY OF 1895 



Would you like to see the present 
Varsity meet this team? Some people 
would come far to see the game. The 
team of a quarter century ago might 
lack in speed, but certainly would have 
the advantage in weight. 

Who are they? Left to right, top row: 
J. Warren Davis, Judge, U. S. Circuit 
Court of Appeals, Trenton, N. J.; G. H. 
Catterall, auditor with the A. C. & F. 
Co., Berwick, Pa.; Frank Holinshead, 
pastor Baptist Church, Lockport, N. Y.; 
J. V. Lesher, for four terras representa- 



tive in Congress of the sixteenth dis- 
trict; J. M. Wilson, banker. Union Nat- 
ional Bank, Pittsburgh; Edward Gil- 
christ, for years a college teacher, re- 
cently deceased; F. E. Hering, coach. 
Second row: B. F. Thomas, Registrar at 
Bucknell; E. M. Cober, principal of 
Holmes H. S., of Pittsburgh; Charles, 
Firth, last heard of teaching at A. & M. 
College, Texas; W. M. Bunnell, lead- 
ing attorney in Scranton; A. M. Devall, 
did not finish, at present lost; M. R. 
Collins, died shortly after graduation. 



Bottom row: Brady, did not finish 
course, lost; George Jennings, for years 
a popular physician in Burlington, 
N. J., died in 1918; D. H. Elliott, a doc- 
tor of osteopathy in California until his 
death in 1918. 

Although this team lost to Penn on 
Oct. 2, by 40-0, it defeated F. & M. 24-0, 
Wyoming Seminary 24-0, Gettysburg 
50-0, the Indians 18-4, and Dickinson 
in its closing game 28-0. Its only other 
defeat was by State, 0-16. 



Cober's Church Burns Mortgage Bucknell Features in Anniversary Riggs Heads Big Mission Work 



The Memorial Baptist Church of Wil- 
liamsport, of which A. A. Cober, '96, is 
pastor, on October 10 burned the mort- 
gage which had long stood against the 
building. During the two years of Dr. 
Cober's pastorate, the $13,000 debt was 
paid, $11,000 of it being raised between 
January 1 and September 26, 1920. 

This was done in addition to the 
pledging of $25,505 toward the New 
World Movement. The church has a 
membership of 474. 

President Hunt preached the sermon 
at the celebration of the mortgage- 
burning. 



Bucknell men and women took a 
prominent part in the Centennial An- 
niversary of the Northumberland Bap- 
tist Association at Muncy, held in Sep- 
tember. 

Dr. Alvin A. Cober, '96, had charge 
of the program, and wrote the Centen- 
nial Hymn. Dr. Raymond West gave 
several stirring addresses. President 
Hunt spoke on the church and educa- 
tion. Dr. A. J. Irey, '79, and Dr. W. 
E. Martin offered prayers, and Dr. J. T. 
Judd made a historical address. Rev; 
John Sherman, '00, acted as clerk. In 
the women's meetings an active part 
was taken by Mrs. Judd, Mrs. Martin, 
Mrs. A. A. Smith, wife of A. A. Smith, 
'98. The doctrinal sermon was preach- 
ed by the Rev. W. J. Peacock, ex-'Ol, 
University Minister at Lewisburg. 



The Rev. George A. Riggs, '07, is 
finishing his second year as General 
Missionary for Porto Rico. In this 
position he is continuing the good work 
which has marked his ten years' work 
on the island. He is at the head of an 
organization numbering 39 workers, and 
including 46 organized churches and 
property valued at 8217,000. The work 
is constantly expanding. 

Last year a campaign of evangelism 
was carried on, which was very suc- 
cessful after the people were disabused 
of the idea that it was a political cam- 
paign in behalf of the party locally in 
power. 

Mr. and Mrs. Riggs, who was form- 
erly Margaret Lesher, '07, resides in 
Rio Piedras, the seat of the insular uni- 
versity. They have four children. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



Bucknell Alumni Monthly 

LEO L. ROCKWELL, '07, 
Editor 
H. S. EVERETT, '12, 
Advertising Manager 

Published monthly during the college 
year by the Bucknell University 
Alumni Association. 

Entered as second-class mail matter 
at the Postoffice at Lewisburg, Pa., 
under the act of Congress, March 3, 
1879. 

Annual subscription to non-members, 
S2.00. 

To life members under the $10 plan, 
$1.50. 

To life members under the new plan, 
it is sent gratis. 

To annual members under the new 
plan, subscription is included in the 
annual dues. 

Checks should be made payable to 
Frank M. Simpson, Treas. 



WHAT IS AN ALUMNUS? 



Does usage, dictionary definition or 
etymology determine the real meaning of 
a word? Whatever philologists may de- 
cide in theory, there are certain words 
which usage must define. One of these is 
that much-abused loan-word, "alumnus". 

What is a Bucknell alumnus? Is it a 
Bucknell graduate? So it was formerly 
thought, and in the constitution of the 
Alumni Association as originally draft- 
ed, membership in the Association was 
limited to holders of the baccalaureate 
and higher degrees. 

But of late a more liberal spirit has 
been astir, and by a recent amendment 
membership is open to non-graduates 
on the same terms as graduates. This 
is in accord with the prevalent usage 
among colleges today, and is based on 
the correct principle that the honor of 
being included among the alumni of 
Alma Mater should not depend so 
much on purely scholastic achieve- 
ment, which might be attained by a 
prig or a crank, as on the evidence of 
having experienced the really liberaliz- 
ing influence which any college should 
wield, the truly educational influence 
which will show its results in loyalty 
to the best interests of Alma Mater, 
and a broad sympathy for all that 
stands for the good, the true and the 
beautiful. 

Etymologically, unless our "little 
Latin" fail us, the word is masculine. 
But by usage, it is, at least in the 
plural, feminine as well. "Alumnae", 
you query? Surely, if you wish to dis- 
tinguish the women as such. Perhaps 
we had better said, of common gender. 
For we do claim the right of speaking 
of the great body of Bucknellians as 
"alumni". 

As to pronunciation, we are not dog- 
matic. For our own use we prefer the 
English ending sounded like "eye". 
But if any wish to let his voice trail 
off into a safe and indistinguishable 
"uh", it is his privilege. We are NOT 
dogmatic. 

The real point in this lamely hu- 
morous ramble is that every former col- 
lege student, graduate or non-graduate, 



man or woman, and every Institute 
graduate, is by divine right and action 
of the General Alumni Association, en- 
titled to the full rights, perquisites, and 
responsibilities of the Alumni. And the 
greatest of these rights, perquisites and 
responsibilities is membership in the 
General Alumni Association and any 
branch Association. 
Why not join now? 

® 

•ORANGE AND BLUE" 



The song printed this time is another 
composed for the Jubilee Anniversary 
in 1896. It resembles the Bucknell Jubi- 
lee Song in seeming to combine the 
qualities an "Alma Mater" should have. 

The song has in addition to its musi- 
cal worth a certain sentimental value, 
because of the fact that the music was 
composed by Bucknell's best-known 
composer. Dr. Robert Lowry, of the 
Class of 1854. 

Dr. Lowry, whose hymns have been 
sung the world over, was for years a 
professor on the faculty of the Uni- 
versity at Lewisburg, and at the same 
time acted as pastor of the local Baptist 
Church. 



-^5>- 



LET'S ALL GET IN 



When the Harvard Endowment drive 
was initiated, the chairmen in certain 
sections found many Harvard men who 
had become so closely identified with 
other institutions that they felt under 
no obligation to contribute to Harvard, 
believing that their local interests de- 
manded their entire support. 

Upon such alumni the representatives 
of the campaign urged at least a nomi- 
nal contribution upon the ground that 
they should at least to a small extent 
ally themselves with the movement in 
order to have a "stake" in the institution, 
to feel themselves a supporting member 
and consequently justly entitled to a 
share in controlling the policy of the 
university. 

That this is a valid argument we are 
sure, and we believe it applies in the 
Bucknell campaign. With half of the 
entire body of Bucknell alumni en- 
gaged in religious and educational work, 
it is natural that many Bucknellians 
have ties which make large claims on 
the narrow financial margin which these 
"non-gainful" occupations allow. 

Nevertheless, a man is as broad as 
his interests, and the best way to assure 
a real interest in any enterprise is to 
have a money investment in it. We be- 
lieve that it wiU largely increase the in- 
telligent interest of any alumnus to 
have actual investment in Bucknell. 

Bucknell is progressing rapidly alonsj 
the line of democratization of control. 
Already the faculty is sharing largely 
in the privilege and burden of adminis- 
tration. The MONTHLY is confident 
that the way will open in the near 
future to wider alumni participation. 

For the welfare of Alma Mater we 
wish that participation to be intelligent, 
springing from a real knowledge of con- 
ditions and a thoughtful consideration 
of the nature of the problems confront- 
ing the institution. We believe the 



best basis for an interest that shall be 
more than superficial will be a financial 
contribution which will confer a clear 
title to participation in shaping the 
policy of the old college. 
Let's all get in on this job! 

® 

NEW YORK NOTES. 



David Jayne Hill for the past year 
has been contributing monthly articles 
concerning the League of Nations and 
various other aspects of international 
relations to The North America Review. 
George H. Doran Co. has recently pub- 
lished Dr. Hill's new book, "American 
World Policies". 

Christy Mathewson, whose illness at 
Saranac Lake, N. Y., has excited the 
interest and sympathy of friends and 
admirers all over the United States, is 
steadily recovering. 

Paul Althouse is filling engagements 
on the concert platform in every part 
of the country as far south as Florida, 
and as far west as Seattle, Wash. Music 
critics state that he has ben making tre- 
mendous strides both vocally and ar- 
tistically. It is said on good authority 
that there is no male singer in concert 
work today who is earning more than 
Mr. Althaus. He probably-will make 
not less than one hundred appearances 
this season. 

Charles E. Young, '10, is now manager 
of the sales promotion department of 
the American Sugar Refining Co., at 
117 Wall street. On resigning his com- 
mission as captain in the regular army, 
he was commissioned to a captaincy in 
the Artillery Section of the Officers' 
Reserve Corps. He is married and re- 
sides at 64 Carlton street, East Orange, 
N.J. 

Ethel Watkins, '10, who is a teacher 
in Scranton, makes week-end trips to 
New York City for special work at 
Columbia University. 

Weaver Pangburn, '10, published a 
creed entitled "I Am an American", in 
the June 5th number of Leslie's Weekly, 
and an article entitled "The War and 
The Community Movement", in the 
July number of the American Journal 
of Sociology. 

Margaret Weddell, '16, is director of 
newspaper publicity for the national 
council of the Y. W. C. A., with offices 
at 600 Lexington avenue. New York 
City. 

Laurens Weddell is head of the for- 
eign department of the Critchfield Ad- 
vertising Co.'s New York office in the 
Flatiron Building. 

Stanley P. Davies is with the State 
Charities Aid Society with headquarters 
in New York City, and is also giving a 
course in sociology at Columbia Uni- 
versity. 

Olive Richards has moved to 415 
W. 118th street. Until recently she was 
connected with the Inter-church World 
Movement. 

Louise Bassell, '17, was married last 
June to Mr. Earl Belcher, of Kalamazoo 
College, and lives in Brooklyn. 

Miss Bessie Rice, formerly a teacher 
in the music department, is now study- 
ing music in this city. 

Dagmar James, '18, is engaged in edi- 
torial work with the MacMillan Co. 

Beatrice Richards, of Scranton, visit- 
ed friends in Honolulu last summer. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



^ FOOTBALL 4 

BUCKNELL, 43; MUHLENBERG, 0. 

The Bucknell machine crushed Muhl- 
enberg at AUentown on October 23, by a 
magnificent exhibition of team-play. 

By straight football the Varsity twice 
pushed Muhlenberg down the field for 
touchdowns in the first quarter, Bowser 
and Wilsbach scoring. 

The second quarter witnessed a repe- 
tition of the same tactics, Bowser going 
across the line for two more touch- 
downs, one after a beautiful 50-yard run. 
In the same period Bowser kicked a 
field-goal from the 44-yard line. 

During the second half Muhlenberg 
braced, and the third quarter was score- 
less, but in the last, Bowser and Wils- 
bach each broke away for a touchdown. 
The Muhlenberg college paper says 
of the game: "Bucknell presented a 
wonderful team, consisting of a heavy 
line and backfield, but unusually fast, a 
team well drilled in team-work, and using 
splendid interference. Bowser, at full- 
back, was easily Bucknell's star, mak- 
ing four touchdowns and a 43-yard field 
goal. All credit must be given the 
BuckneU team, which played a hard, 
clean game". 

Because of the presence of Lafayette 
scouts, only straight football was used. 

The lineup was as follows: 
Bucknell Muhlenberg 

Julian Parks 

Left End 

Homan Taggart 

Left Tackle 

Morrett Freitag 

Left Guard 

Bihl O'Connor 

Center 

Reed Snyder 

Right Guard 

Dooley Bond 

Right Tackle 

McDermott Crowley 

Right End 

M'angan Feldman 

Quarterback 

Wilsbach Maxim 

Left Halfback 

Kostos, Capt Anderson 

Right Halfback 

Bowser Bright 

Fullback 
Substitutions — For Bucknell: War- 
go for McDermott, Bellac for Man- 
gan, Morgan for Bihl, Dietrick for 
Bowser, Gdaniec for Wilsbach; for 
Muhlenberg: Wills for O'Connor, Wills 
for Maxim, Skean for Snyder, Shook 
for Anderson, Faher for Bright. 

Touchdowns— Bowser, 4; Wilsbach, 
2. Goals from touchdowns — Man ? 
* * » 

BUCKNELL, 51; ST. BONA- 
VENTURE, 0. 

A light, but plucky team from St. 
Bonaventure, was unable to withstaiid 
Bucknell's plunging attack on Tustin 
Field, October 30, the Varsity scoring 
seven touchdowns and a safety. Due 
to the probable presence of Lafayette 
scouts, only four different plays were 
used throughout the game. 

The first period saw Bucknell launch 
a vicious attack with Bowser, Wils- 
bach, Mangan, and Kostos carrying the 
ball. The first touchdown was scored 



by Bowser, after four minutes of play. 
A thirty-yard run by Bowser, and gains 
by the other backs, brought the ball a 
second time close to the St. Bonaven- 
ture line, and Wilsbach carried it across. 
Julian, tackling the visitors' fullback as 
he recovered a high pass back of his 
own goal line, added a safety. 

The second period saw Julian feature 
again, capturing the ball on a fumble 
by St. Bonaventure, and scoring. Reed 
ran back thirty yards on the kick-off, 
Bowser, Mangan, and W,ilsbach carried 
the ball to the line, and Wilsbach scor- 
ed. Mangan ran the next kick-off back 
30 yards, and after gains by Bowser 
and Kostos, Bowser broke away for a 
thirty-yard run to a touchdown. Mac- 
Dermott scored on a forward pass. 

The third period opened with a 35-yard 
run from the kick-off by Bowser, and a 
march down the field to another touch- 
down by Wilsbach. Bowser scored the 
last touchdown in this period on a run 
of 25 yards. 

The fourth period was slow, and no 
scoring was done. 

The lineup was as follows: 
Bucknell St. Bonaventure 

Julian Gavigan 

Left End 

Homan Callahan 

Left Tackle 

Morrett Cunningham 

Left Guard 

Bihl Kelly 

Center 

Reed Robinson 

Right Guard 

Dooley O'Meara 

Right Tackle 

McDermott Martineau 

Right End 

Mangan Mann 

Quarterback 

Wilsbach Morris 

Left Halfback 

Kostos Lucco 

Right Halfback 

Bowser Lynch 

FuUback 
Referee— E. E. Miller, Penn State. 
Umpire— Charles Miller, Penn. Head 
Linesman— Moffatt, Penn State. 

Touchdowns — Bowser, 2; Wi'.sbach, 3; 
McDermott, 1; Julian, 1. Goals from 
touchdowns — Mangan, 6; McDermott 1. 
Substitutes— Deitrich for Kostos, Laus- 
ter for Reed, Bellac for Bowser, Wargo 
for Julian, McGraw for Dooley, Day- 
• hoff for Dietrich. Time of quarters— 
15 and 12 minutes. 

BUCKNELL, 2; NAVY, 7. 
The Naval Academy won a hard 
fought game at Annapolis on October 
16, scoring a touchdown on a for%vard 
pass, while the best Bucknell could do 
was to force the Navy back over her 
own goal line for a safety. Both scores 
were made in the third quarter. All the 
other periods witnessed a desperate 
struggle, in which neither team could 
develop an offensive sufficient to score. 

Bowser again was the surest ground- 
gainer for Bucknell. Hahn was the 
man who fell on Ewen as he recovered 
a fumble back of the Navy goal line, 
scoring the safety. A battle royal be- 
tween the two hues featured the game. 

The lineup was as follows: 
Navy Bucknell 

P21.J. Hahn 

Left End 



BoUes Homan 

Left Tackle 

Willkie Morrett 

Left Guard 

Lars ^n Bihl 

Center 

Moore Wilsbach 

Right Guard 

King Dooley 

Right Tackle 

Ewen McDermott 

Right End 

Cruise Mangan 

Quarterback 

Koehler Gdaniec 

Left Halfback 

Barchet Kostos 

Right Halfback 

Noj^es Bowser 

Fullback 
Score by periods: 

Navy 7 0—7 

Bucknell 2 0—2 

Touchdown — Ewen. Goal from touch- 
down — King. Safety — Hahn. Substi- 
tutions — Navy: Manez for Parr, Parr 
for Manez, Taylor for Barchet, Bar- 
chet for Taylor, Watters for Barchet; 
Bucknell: Julian for Hahn, Gdaniec tor 
Bihl, Dayhoff for Gdaniec. Gdaniec for 
Dayhoff, Reed for Wilsbach, Wilsbach 
for Reed, Bellack for Gdaniec. Referee 
— W. N. Hollenback, University of 
Pennsylvania. Umpire — E. M. Bennis, 
Pennsylvania. Head linesman — E. E. 
Miller, Penn State. Time of quarters— 
15 minutes. 

BUCKNELL, 48; URSINUS, 0. 

The Ursinus team which had defeat- 
ed Rutgers two weeks before, was help- 
less before Bucknell's attack on October 

9. 

In the first quarter the full Varsity 
lineup went in, and during the period 
scored four touchdowns, two by Bowser, 
one by Gdaniec, one by DayhoS. 

In the second quarter Bowser brought 
the crowd to its feet with a beautiful 
field goal from the 40-yard line, and a 
touchdown was made by Gdaniec. 
Many substitutions were made. 

After the snake dance between the 
halves, the student body formed in 
front of the gymnasium and cheered 
the Ursinus eleven, as it appeared for 
the second^ half. The Bucknell team 
stayed on the field between halves. 

Bowser featured with long runs in 
the second half, scoring two touch- 
downs. Numerous substitutions were 
made to try out new material. 

Referee Beaver stated that it was the 
cleanest game he had ever seen, while 
the members of the LTrsinus team ex- 
pressed themselves as delighted with 
their treatment. 

The lineup was as follows: 
Bucknell Ursinus 

Hahn Gotschalk 

Left End 

Homan Capt. Helffrich 

Left Tackle 

Morrett Updike 

Left Guard 

Bihl Glass 

Center 

Wilsbach Buchanan 

Right Guard 

Dooley Greiman 

Right Tackle 

McDermott Mozer 

Right End 
(Continued on Page Six) 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



Alumni Organizations 



.•»•»•»•..•..( 



•••"•"••■•••I 



..•..•..•..•«•*> 



HAVE YOU A BUCKNELL 
CLUB IN YOUR DISTRICT? 



We published last month a hst of 
regional Alumni Clubs. Most of these 
are active and enthusiastic in stirring 
up Bucknell spirit. Is there one in your 
section? If not, why not? 

The Alumni Office will gladly furnish 
a list of nearby Bucknellians to anyone 
who feels the spirit move him to "start 
something". We will also gladly send 
a model constitution, which will make 
possible an elastic organization. 

By a regrettable error, the October 
MONTHLY gave in its list of officers 
for Alumni organizations the wrong per- 
sons the honor of heading the Phila- 
delphia Alumnae Club. 

The officers are: President, Mar- 
garet Grofif, '04, 19 W. Union St., West 
Chester, Pa.; Secretary, Emily Ebling, 
'03, 5000 Knox St., Germantown, Pa. 

UNKNOWN ALUMNI 



The following list comprises Alumni 
with whom we have as yet been unable 
to get in touch. We shall appreciate 
any information concerning them. 

Any Alumnus who knows other Buck- 
nell people who are not in touch with 
the institution, will confer a favor by 
sending us their names. 

Frank Landis Yost, '06; Leander W. 
Baldwin, '96; Peter Paul Brantly, '17; 
Mary Margaret Brown, '13; Oliver S. 
Delancey, '12; Roy A. Belong, '11; 
Philip J. Dickerson, '95; Homer Dow- 
lin, '92; Andrew N. Evans, '01; Charles 
Firth, '96; Forrest L. Fulton, '96; Wil- 
liam W. Goodwin, '97; Mrs. Hilbert 
Hauseknecht, nee' Maze Callahan, '12; 
Albert C. Hutchinson, '99; Mrs. A. C. 
Hutchinson, nee' Eliza Blair Bell, 
'00; Frank M. Jenner, '10; Daniel M. 
Jones, '88; William G. Keys, '78; John 
R. Kurtz, '16; Charles Osner Long, '09; 
Leda A. MacFarland, '15; V. Inez 
Maplesden, '11; Joseph Edward Millen, 
'02; Elmer H. Myers, '01; Ferdinand F. 
Nelson, '97; John Henry Newhauser, 
'01; Benjamin E. Phillips, '06; Clayton 

E. Phillips, '13; John W. Poler, '68; De- 
linda Potter, '13; Carl S. Yingling, 
'06; Clarence K. Pugh, '11; Martin L. 
Ross, '99; Frederick O. Schub, '94; Wil- 
liam J. Schultz, '10; Blaine W. Scott, 
'12; Helen A. C. Scott, '11; R. M. 
Shearer, '17; Thomas A, Sherbondy, '02; 
Alexander M. Sherwood, '10; James W. 
Shipe, '11; Edmund Davis ShuU, '77; J. 

F. Snyder, '01; Ernest F. Snyder, '19; 
Frank L. Stewart, '06; William Cham- 
berlain Summers, '83; Victor F. Swen- 
son, '14; Bruce H. Trimmer, '98; Isaac 
R. Vincent, '00; Harry M. Walter, '09; 
Arthur David Waltz, '12; Thomas Ben- 
ton Williams, '15. 



DOINGS OF ALUMNI CLUBS THOSE QUESTIONNAIRES 



New York Banquet 

The Alumni of New York and vicin- 
ity banqueted on Thursday evening, 
November 4. 

President Hunt and Professor Linde- 
mann were present. A full account will 
be published next month. 



Pittsburgh Alive 

John T. Shirley, ex-'09, is the new 
secretary of the Pitts Alumni Club, and 
is very much on the job.' The Pitts- 
burgh Club was reorganized during the 
summer and a new constitution adopt- 
ed. By an error Mr. Shirley's address 
was • last month given as "Carnegie". 
It is 1102 Park Building, Pittsburgh. 

On October 1, the Alumni were ad- 
dressed by General Brett, Commander 
of the 80th Division over-seas. 

The following card explains the ex- 
cellent luncheon plan of the Pittsburgh 
Bucknellians, which is commended to 
the attention of the other clubs: 
® 

Alumni Athletic Organization 

The Athletic Board at its Philadel- 
phia meeting decided to take steps 
toward the organization of an Alumni 
Athletic Association to further the in- 
telligent cooperation of Alumni in ath- 
letics. 

The details of the organization are 
now being worked out by a committee 
composed of Graduate Manager C. E. 
Glass, Professor E. M. Heim, and R. W. 
Thompson, '04. 



-®- 



Alumnae Publish Song Book 



The Willis Company, of Cincinnati, 
has just introduced "Songs" of the 
Seasons", a supplementary rote song 
collection for the earlier grades in 
schools. 

The texts are by Alif Stephens, '04, 
the music by Ruth Stephens Porter, '05. 

WE ARE NOT TELEPATHISTS! 

The Alumni are hereby notified 
that the Alumni Office greets with 
shouts of joy such communications 
as the following: "I want to notify 
you of another change of address on 
my part. I have moved five times 
in the last two years, but have not 
missed a single copy of the Monthly". 

N. B. — The moral of this tale i; 
that HE DID HIS PART. 
1 — 



The Alumni Office wishes to express 
its gratitude to those who responded 
promptly to its request for information 
sent out in August. Although the ma- 
terial came in too slowly to make pos- 
sible the execution of the original de- 
sign of incorporating a certain amount 
of biographical material in the Alumni 
Catalog, it is of great service in as- 
suring accuracy in names and addresses. 

Furthermore, it will be of the greatest 
value in furnishing news items for the 
MONTHLY this year and will be in- 
valuable in the future as a permanent 
record. 

We wish especially to extend our con- 
gratulations to the older graduates, be- 
cause they have shown themselves, in 
general, more careful in their responses 
than those of recent years. Much ma- 
terial concerning the older alumni, 
which we could have obtained in no 
other way, was made available by their 
courtesy in this matter. 

Those who have laid aside the matter 
for future consideration, we wish to re- 
mind that we need their replies to 
complete our records. In case they 
have mislaid the card, we shall be glad 
to forward a duplicate on request. 

The questionnaires were sent to all 
former students who were on our mail- 
ing list in August. We are trying to 
send them out to all whose addresses 
we have obtained since that time, but 
if any alumnus has not yet received 
one, we shall be grateful for a notifica- 
tion of the fact. 

® 

Fries at Burton Inaugural 



Professor C. C. Fries represented the 
University at the recent inaugural ex- 
ercises of President Marion L. Burton, 
of the University of Michigan. 

Prominent among the exercises was 
a conference on present-day educational 
problems, which was addressed by Pro- 
vost Walker, of Yale, President Vinson, 
of Texas, Dean Fund, of Harvard Law 
School, and President Falconer, of 
Toronto, and other leading educators. 
® 

Charles A. Zeller, and Murvington H. 
Malaun, who would have been seniors 
at Bucknell this year, have entered 
medical colleges, the former Jefferson, 
the latter, Pennsylvania. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



"•"•"••^•••-••••••••••> A 



In the Public Eye 



Bucknellians at 

Baptist Convention 



Many alumni took prominent part in 
the Baptist State Convention held at 
Williamsport, October lS-21. 

The Rev.. Max C. Wiant, '09, presided 
at the meeting of the Ministers' Union, 
in the program of which the Rev. A. B. 
Bowser, '88, of Ford City, had part. 

Dr. C. A. Soars, '89, presented the 
proposed constitution and by-laws, which 
were adopted on Tuesday. 

The Rev. Fred B. Igler, '12, present- 
ed a splendid report of his activities 
as Student Pastor in Philadelphia. 

Dr. Samuel Zane Batten, 'So, present- 
ed the report of the Social Service Com- 
mittee, which was received with great 
interest. 

Dr. Frank M. Goodchild, '84, gave the 
address before the Laymen's Union. 

President Emory W. Hunt addressed 
the Convention on "A Look Ahead". 

The Rev. J. Earle Edwards, '10, A. A. 
Smith, Esq., '98, and the Rev. Joseph H. 
Cooke, '98, were active in committee 
work, while the devotional studies of the 
afternoon sessions were given by Presi- 
dent Milton G. Evans, '82, of Crozer. 

Tuesday was "Bucknell Day". A 
banquet was given at the Church of the 
Covenant, at which mostly Bucknel- 
lians were seated. Stirring addresses by 
President Hunt, Professor Wm. E. 
Martin, and Dr. John T. Judd were 
enthusiastically received by the alumni 
present. Forty members of the Glee 
Club were guests at the dinner, and 
their songs were greeted with hearty 
applause. 

The Glee Club also sang at the even- 
ing session of the Convention on Tues- 
day, and as a result. Manager Hartz 
booked some twenty concerts in church- 
es throughout Pennsylvania. 

Among the Bucknellians present were: 
President and Mrs. Emory W. Hunt, 
Professor and Mrs. Wm. E. Martin, Pro- 
fessor and Mrs. Llewellyn Phillips, Pro- 
fessor and Mrs. H. T. Colestock, Prof. 
Paul G.Stolz, Prof. L.L.Rockwell, Regis- 
trar B. F. Thomas, Rev. and Mrs. W.J. 
Peacock, Rev. John T. Judd, Dr. and 
Mrs. Leroy Stephens, Rev. Chas. A. 
Kulp, '00; Rev. Herbert Bower, ex-'99; 
Rev. A. W. Anderson, ex-'OO; Rev. R. D. 
Minch, ex-'91; Rev. C. G. Langford. 
'91; T. J. S. Heim, '20; W. G. Payne, 
'09; E. G. Guver, '09; Margaret G. 
Walker, ex-'17; Rev. A. A. Cober, '96; 
Rev. Geo. Ballentine, '71; Prof. John 
Ballentine, '72; Rev. R. M. Hunsicker, 
'82; Dr. A. J. Irey, '79; Rev. J. H. 
Cooke, '98; Rev. H. S. Myatt, '15; Rev. 
Fred B. Igler, '12; Rev. E. Paul Smith, 
'10; W. L. Sprout, '10; Rev. John Sher- 
man, '00; Rev. E. N. Huff, '01; Hon. E. 
L. Tustin, '84; Dr. M. G. Evans, '82; 
A. A. Smith, '98; Rev. E. W. Rumsey, 
'06; Rev. Max C. Wiant, '10; Rev. 
Nelson Grossman, '10; Rev. A. S. Wahl, 
ex-'09; Dr. Chas. A. Walker, '89; Dr. 
C. A. Soars, '89; Miss Anna Judd, '00. 



Piersol, '08, Has Big Job 

L. O. Piersol, '08, was in June made 
Southern manager of the sales force of 
the Lidgerwood Manufacturing Co., 
dealing in logging machinery. 

After graduation from Bucknell, Mr. 
Piersol went to the Pacific Coast where 
he learned the logging business from 
the ground up, starting in the logging 




L. O. Piersol, '08 

camps to become acquainted with every 
phase of the work. 

The Seattle office of the Lidgerwood 
Co., impressed with his work, engaged 
his services. Shortly afterwards he was 
transferred to the New York office and 
set up many machines in Michigan, 
Wisconsin, Minnesota and the south. 

Sometime later he transferred to the 
south entirely, selling Lidgerwood ma- 
chines for Woodward Wight & Co., of 
New Orleans, later he was made south- 
ern manager for the Lidgerwood Co., 
in charge of all their business in that 
section. 

® 

Congressman Lesher Loses 

Representative John V. Lesher, '95, 
shared the fate of many colleagues on 
the Democratic ticket throughout the 
country when he was defeated in his 
candidacy for a fifth term in Congress 
from the Sixteenth District. 

His opponent was Clinton Kline, of 
Northumberland County. 

® 

Raiguels Back From Europe 

Dr. and Mrs. George Earle Raiguel, 
of Philadelphia, have returned from 
a tour of England, Holland, Belgium, 
France, Switzerland and Italy, and 
were recent guests at the home of Mrs. 
Raiguel's mother, Mrs. Geo. S. Matlack, 
on South Second street. 

Dr. Raiguel and Burton Holmes spent 
some time in Egypt and Palestine. 
Later Mt. Holmes visited Constanti- 



nople and the Italian lakes, while Dr. 
Raiguel went to Vienna, Budapest, 
Trieste and Fiume. 

The well known lecturer secured 
much invaluable first-hand information 
on the social, political and economic 
conditions in the countries he visited. 

Mrs. Raiguel was a member of the In- 
stitute Class of 1895. 

® 

Shreve Wins in 

Remarkable Campaign 

Congressman Milton W. Shreve, '84, 
of Erie, won a remarkable victory in . 
the Twenty-fifth District, defeating 
both Republican and Democratic can- 
didates. 

The liquor interests were all arrayed 
against Representative Shreve, but 
waging a hard campaign as an Inde- 
pendent and Prohibition candidate after 
losing the primary fight, he gained a 
well-earned victory and will again repre- 
sent his district in Congress. 

® 

Bucknellians Win and Lose 

Charles F. Bidlespacher, '01, was re- 
elected to the state legislature from Ly- 
coming County on the Republican 
ticket. 

Claire Groover, '15, though running 
ahead of the rest of the Democratic 
ticket, was defeated by a small ma- 
jority in his campaign for state as- 
semblyman from Union County. 

Miss Frances W. Baker, of Wildwood, 
N. J., went down to defeat with the 
rest of the Democratic candidates, al- 
though she ran far ahead of the rest of 
the ticket. She was running for the 
New Jersey Assembly. 

® 

Williamsport Likes Bucknellians 

That the Bucknellians on the Wil- 
liamsport High School faculty have 
made good is evidenced by the large 
number of new teachers recruited this 
year from among the alumni. 

They are Emma Levegood, '18; Grace 
Rossiter, '13; Adelia Wilkes, '19; Robert 
S. Kyle, '20; Jeannette Owens, '17; T. 
J. S. Heim, '20; Hazel Gay, '18; Walter 
Roos, '20. 

® 

Bucknell at Columbia 

Among the Bucknell alumni who at- 
tended the summer school at Columbia 
this summer were the following: G. C. 
L. Riemer, '95; Raymond Plank Lewis, 
'19; Ira Sheppard, '04; Helen Laura 
Ruth, '12; Helen King Bartol, '13; John 
Edgar Bennett, '18; Elixa Johnston 
Martin, '00; Orville Clyde Wrigley, '19; 
Karl Kelchner HuUey, '19; Marguerite 
Frances May, '18; Margaret Christine 
Gretzinger, '15; Charles Henry Fisher, 
'17; Harry S. Bourne, '11. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



Bowling, '13, Leads 

Active Church 



The Rev. R. H. Bowling, '13, who is 
pastor of the First Baptist Church, of 
Norfolk, Va., has inaugurated a church 
program which makes full use of the 
well-equipped church plant at his dis- 
posal. 

He has issued a card setting forth the 
service his church is offering. It in- 
cludes: a free Employment Bureau; a 
free Information Bureau as to lodging 
places; a free Reading Room with a 
library of a thousand volumes and 
numerous magazines; a playground 
with classes in athletic exercises under 
trained supervision; a distributing sta- 
tion for certified milk; a kindergarten; 
a day nursery under charge of a gradu- 
ate nurse; a bureau giving free adviqe 
to mothers. 

Plans include the establishment of a 
free clinic. 

® 

Dillon, '98, to Teach Journalism 



We clip from "The Fourth Estate" 
the following interesting account of 
one of Bucknell's most loyal Alumni: 

Frank W. Dillon, managing editor 
of the Erie (Pa.), Evening Herald, has 
been appointed assistant professor of 
Journalism in the University of Kan- 
sas to fill the vacancy caused by the 
resignation of Professor W. A. Dill, who 
went to Chicago as assistant night edi- 
tor for the Associated Press. 

Mr. Dillon is an A.B., cum laude, 
from Bucknell University, 1898. Since 
graduation he has done considerable 
work toward his M.A. degree. He be- 
gan newspaper work early, making his 
expense in college by work for the Phila- 
delphia and Pittsburgh papers. He has 
had experience in both city and country 
journalism. 

On the Erie Dispatch-News, and the 
Evening Herald, he has filled practical- 
ly all positions in a newspaper office. 
He has also had experience in adver- 
tising and publicity work. 

Soon after graduations Mr. Dillon 
travelled abroad in an advertising capa- 
city for an American firm. He spent 
three years in England and on the con- 
tinent, visiting more than 900 towns, 
and incidentally, making a study of 
their literary aiid educational shrines. 
Newspaper workers in Erie speak of 
him as a constructive force in journal- 
ism. 

Mr. Dillon has two daughters whom he 
expects to educate in college while re- 
siding in Lawrence, Kansas, where the 
state university is located. The Kan- 
sas School of Journalism has 300 of the 
4,000 university students taking courses 
in newspaper work. 



^ FOOTBALL 4 

(Continued from Page Three) 

Dayhoff Schwartz 

Quarterback 

Gdaniec Miller 

Left Halfback 

Kostos, Capt Newett 

Right Halfback 

Bowser Isenberg 

FuUback 
Referee — ^Beaver, West Point. Um- 
pire — E. E. Miller, Penn State. Head 
linesman, C. C. Goes, Syracuse. Field 
Judge — Wheatley, Navy. Time of 
quarters — 15 and 12 minutes. Touch- 
downs — Bowser, 3. Field Goal — Bowser. 
Substitutions — Ursinus: Vosburg for 
Mozer. Bucknell: Reed for Hahn, Day- 
hoff for Kostos, Johnson for Dayhoff, 
Julian for McDermott, McGraw for 
Dayhoff, Garrison for Gdaniec, Butler 
for Reed, Wargo for Julian, BeUac for 
Johnson, Reed for Bihl, Lauster for 
Reed, Reed for Butler, Dietrich for Mc- 
Graw, Coene for Homan, Morgan for 
Dooley and Dykens for Morrett. 
® 

David A. McNeal, J. P. 

Announcement was made from Har- 
risburg that David A. McNeal, of 
Towanda, had been appointed a Justice 
of the Peace, by Governor Sproul. 

The appointment comes as a mer- 
ited recognition of Mr. McNeal, who 
for a number of years has been read- 
ing law in the offices of Lilley & Wilson 
in this place. Mr. McNeal is well vers- 
ed in law, is a graduate of Bucknell Uni- 
versity, finishing his course there in 1912 
as an honor man, and should make a 
capable official in his new position. — 
Towanda Daily Review. 

® 

"Jake" Fools 'Em 

G. H. Northrop, '10, who since the 
dose of the American Association sea- 
son has been pitching for the Towanda 
Independents, has been surprising the 
natives of the Northern Tier with some 
"big league stuff". In a game against 
Sayre, which ran twelve innings to a 
scoreless tie, he struck out 28 men, and 
in another game the same week struck 
out 20 in nine innings. In this game he 
hit a homer with three men on bases. 



Place this card conspicuously: 
Keep in mind and come to the Pitts- 
burgh-Bucknell Alumni Luncheon, 
Tuesday of each week, 12:15 P. M. 
(Private Room, Chamber of Com- 
merce. See Bulletin Board for Room 
Number). "BuckneU Means You". 
John T. Shirley, Secy., 1102 Park 
BIdg., Pittsburgh, Grant 5618. Pitts- 
burgh, Pa., October 9, 1920. 



BRIEFS FROM NORTH- 
EAST PENNSYLVANIA 



Richard N. Mackey, ex-'08, a gradu- 
ate of Medico Chi, who was a practising 
physician before the war, has been 
transferred from the reserve to the regu- 
lar service in the Navy, and is the ex- 
amining doctor with the rank of lieu- 
tenant, and in charge at the Wilkes- 
Barre branch of the U. S. Navy Re- 
cruiting service. He resides at Clarks 
Summit. 



Herbert S. Lloyd, '11, is teacher of 
English and history and athletic coach 
at Kingston High School. His voice be- 
ing one of the best bassos in North- 
eastern Pennsylvania, he is a member 
of the Elm Park M. E. church. Scran- 
ton, quartet, and is frequently heard in 
solos at various affairs. 



W. Lee Sprout, '10, who for many 
years was a teacher at Keystone Acad- 
emy, and last year its acting principal, 
has resigned to take up business with 
his father in Picture Rocks. 



A decided tribute to the ability and 
integrity of attorney James P. Harris, 
'16, of Wilkes-Barre, was paid last month 
by the Luzerne County bar, when he 
was appointed one of the receivers of 
the Owen Magnetic Motor Car Co. 



Willard M. Bunnell, '97, an attorney, 
who has been and is prominent in the 
social, political, religious and education- 
al circles of Scranton and Lackawanna 
county, has been selected as one of the 
nine members of the board of former 
Scranton Central High school students 
to direct its athletic activities. 



David J. Martin, '20, is associated 
with the Lycoming Rubber Co., at Wil- 
liamsport, preparing for salesmanship. 



William S. Baldwin, '09, is a lumber 
dealer and contractor at Clarks Sum- 
mit. The mother of Mrs. Baldwin, who 
was Ella Garvin. ex-'09, died last month. 



Vida S. Davenport, '94, of West Pitts- 
ton, who taught Latin in West Pitts- 
ton high school for several years, is this 
year teaching that subject at Pleasant- 
ville, N. J. 

* » * 

Alvin Rummer, '16, is in charge of 
physical training and assistant coach at 
Wilkes-Barre High School. 



Walter B. Brinker, '07, is manager for 
the A. W. Evans Co., coal dealers, at 
Keokuk, Iowa. 



Henry Fonda, '18, of Milton, and Rob- 
ert Bell, '20, of Mt. Union, are studying 
law at the University of Pennsylvania. 



Eward L. Howell, '11, is burgess of 
Northumberland. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



PERSONALS 



1876 
Prof. Albert Burns Stewart is enter- 
ing upon his eleventh year as Profes- 
sor of Mathematics at Colgate Uni- 
versity. 

1881 
The Rev. Frank W. Cramer is now 
residing at Flora, Ind., where he recent- 
ly accepted a charge. He was form- 
erly at Indianapolis. 
1883 
The Rev. Dr. William J. Coulston is 
a Baptist pastor in Sac City, Iowa. 
1885 
J. Newton Glover, ex-'85, of Vicks- 
burg was in attendance at the State 
Synod of the Presbyterian Church in 
Wilkes-Barre during October. 

The Rev. Joseph E. Sagebeer has been 
for twenty years a member of the Board 
of Managers of the Baptist Publication 
Society. 

1886 
Dr. Elmer E. Keiser is a trustee of 
the newly organized Northeast National 
Bank, of Philadelphia. 

William A. Lewis is Cashier with the 
Berkshire Life Insurance Co., at 253 
Broadway, New York. 

Hon. L. S. Walter, of Mount Carmel, 
Pa., was the chief speaker at the Re- 
publican Mass Meeting in Lewisburg 
on the night of November 1st. His 
two sons are Bucknell men, Mark M. 
being a graduate of the Class of 1915, and 
Stewart M., a member of the Class of 
1919. 

1887 
Prof. Walter S. Harley, of Erasmus 
Hall High School, Brooklyn, is the 
editor of several Latin texts published 
by Silver, Burdett & Co., his latest be- 
ing an elementary text entitled, "Latin 
for the First Year". 
1888 
The Rev. George W. Hatch has been 
since 1916, chaplain of the Pennsylvania 
State Grange. 

1894 
The Rev. Dr. A. E. Finn is beginning 
his third year as pastor of the Moulton 
Memorial Church at Newburgh, N. Y. 
1894 
The Rev. Almon O. Stevens, who is a 
Congregational pastor in Beloit, Wis., is 
Chairman of the Board of Directors 
of the Wisconsin Congregational Con- 
ference. 

The Rev. Joseph R. Wood, who is 
Executive Secretary of the Newark, 
N. J., Federation of Churches, while a 
Y. M. C. A. Secretary with the Third 
Division, A. E. F., was twice cited in 
the Aisne-Marne and the Meuse-Ar- 
gonne campaigns. 

Frank W. Jackson, while serving as 
chairman of the Greek Relief Commis- 
sion of America, was knighted by King 
Alexander, of Grece. He is also a mem- 
ber of the Armenian-Syrian Relief Com- 
mission, and an officer of the Royal 
Order of George I. 

The Rev. Richard D. Minch is Dis- 
trict Missionary of the Wayne Baptist 
Association, residing at Tyler Hill, Pa. 
1895 
Dr. G. C. L. Riemer, of the Pennsyl- 
vania Department of Public Instruc- 
tion, was renewing acquaintances in 
Lewisburg recently. 



1897 

Leroy Tyson Butler has served for 
ten years as Borough Treasurer of 
Lewisburg. 

Mary Owens-Eccleston is renting 
clerk for the East River Homes, com- 
prising 382 apartments, and resides at 
509 East 77th Street, New York. 

William Frederick Eicholtz is manag- 
ing editor and part owner of the Sun- 
bury Daily. 

Dr. David S. Grim, who as a First 
Lieutenant in the Medical Corps was 
on the staff of the Santo Tomas and 
Ancon Hospitals, Canal Zone, while in 
service, is again located in Reading, and 
is on the staff of the St. Joseph's Hos- 
pital as a specialist in dermatology and 
"genito-urinary diseases. 

F. W. Wagner is in oil production, in- 
surance, and real estate business in 
Bradford. 

1898 
Enos Cook Baker, Jr., is a chemist 
on the staff of the Lukens Steel Co., 
at Coatesville. 

Edward H. Flint is auditor of the 
Fiscal Agency Department of the Fed- 
eral Reserve Bank, of Philadelphia, and 
resides at 5713 Lansdowne Ave., Phila- 
delphia. 

Dr. Frank C. Katherman is engaged 
in the practice of medicine at Whitney, 
Pa. 

Paul Emil Whitehouse is located at 
the Y. M. C. A., Pasadena, Cal. 
1899 
The Rev. E. C. Conover is pastor of 
the Freehold Baptist Church at Free- 
hold, N. J. 

Grace A. DeWolf is private secretary 
and accountant with the New Jersey 
Baptist Convention. 

Edwin Alden Humeston is district 
superintendent for the Louden Machine 
Co., residing at Meadville, Pa. 

Daniel Horatio Krise is head of the 
mathematics department of the Johns- 
town High School. 

1900 
Fred W. McFarlin has been district 
attorney for Elk County since 1909. 

Emmons L. Peck is owner and man- 
ager of the Emmons L. Peck Lumber 
Co., engaged in the manufacture of lum- 
ber. He resides at Equinunk, Pa. 

The Rev. Loren M. Reno, who has 
been since 1904 a missionary for the 
Southern Baptist Convention, located 
at Victoria, Brazil, has issued several 
theological works in Portuguese. 
1901 
Archibald Merrill Allison is chairman 
of the mathematics department of the 
Lake View High School of Chicago. 

Albert F. Meschter is department 
manager with the Dupont's at Wilming- 
ton, and resides at Woodstown, N. J. 

Harland Adams Trax is chief account- 
ant for the New York Telephone Co., 
with headquarters at 15 Dey street. 
New York. 

The Rev. Charles E. Goodall is pastor 
of the First Baptist Church of Roselle, 
N. J., and president of the Roselle Pub- 
lic Library. 

1902 
Dr. T. Lamar Williams, of Mount 
Carmel, was a visitor at the college re- 
cently. 

Eli Peter Heckert is supervising prin- 
cipal of schools at Mauch Chunk. 

John Holman Weiser is a member of 
the firm of W. H. Manbeck & Co., en- 
gaged in milling at Mifflin, Pa. 



Margaret Runyan Hylbert, wife of 
the Rev. L. C. Hylbert, '05, of Ningpo, 
China, addressed the Missionary So- 
ciety of the Lewisburg Baptist Church 
on October 14 on Chinese conditions. 
1903 
George R. Bliss, who was in the ser- 
vice twenty-five months as captain in 
the Ordnance Department, since his 
discharge has resumed his business of 
farming and selling farm machinery at 
Silver Spring, Md. 

John J. Brandt is president of the 
Citizens' State Bank of Williamsport. 

Mrs. Raymond S. BuUis, formerly 
Jane Fowler, resides at 501 North New- 
lin Ave., Whittier, Cal. Mr. and Mrs 
Bullis have one son, John Spencer, born 
December 23, 1918. 

Alexander Forrest Dershimer is a 
major in the Quartermaster's Corps, 
stationed in Washington, engaged in 
construction service. 

Blair Jaekel had a short story "The 
Shrieker of Shurwar Toda" in the Pub- 
lic Ledger Magazine for October 31st. 
1904 
Roger S. Edwards is Pittsburgh Dis- 
trict Manager for the Power Specialty 
Co., with headquarters at 1026 Park 
Building. 

Harry E. McCormick was in Lewis- 
burg visiting during the last week of 
October. 

Rev. Charles R. Myers, of Mount 
Carmel, Pa., visited in Lewisburg early 
in November. 

Ira Sheppard is teaching mathematics 
in the South Side High School of New- 
ark, N. J. 

John Henry Stahl is with the National 

City Bank at 55 Wall street. New York, 

Dr. B. F. White, Jr., is practicing 

medicine in Bradford, with offices at 65 

Congress street. 

1905 
Ralph L. Belford has established an 
excellent law practice at Mi'ton. His 
offices are at 106 South Front street. 

Dr. E. O. B''ckel has been since 1913 
supervising principal of the Mifflinburg 
public schools. 

Mary I. Bower has resigned her posi- 
tion at Be'levue High School to accept 
one in the mathematics department of 
the Allegheny High School. 

Harry A. Coryell is district attorney 
of Snyder County. 

Mrs. John T. Fetherston, formerly 
Edith Kelly, has recently been special- 
izing in the study of Russian. 

I. Roy Hanna is Assistant Director 
of Service with Babson's Statistical Or- 
ganization at Wel'esley Hills, Mass. 

Martha Wolfe Ka'p is a clerk in the 
Lewisburg National Bank. 
1906 
Burleigh Claypoole is teaching at 
Wilson Creek, Wash. 

Holmes A. Frank is with the Silver 
Bullion Mines, Ltd., of Montreal, with 
headquarters at Liverpool, Nova Scotia 
and Montreal. 

Dr. Leroy W. Hoon has been since 
1914 engaged in the practice of medicine 
at Monongahela, Pa., with offices at 216 
Main street. 

Mrs. George F. Hummel, formerly 
Mary Seaman, ex-'06, resides at Ninth 
and Linden streets, Allentown, Pa. 

Harry M. Parmley, ex'06, is with the 
Elliott Fisher Co., of Harrisburg, hav- 
ing charge of scheduling. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



Mis. Wilbert H, Parsons, formerly 
Daisy VanSyckle Parsons, resides at 
Troy, Pa. 

Dickson S. Stauffer is branch man- 
ager with the Pfister and Vogel Leather 
Co., of St. Louis, with headquarters at 
1602 Locust stret. 

1907 

Anne White Galbraith, who is an edi- 
tor with the Grit Publishing Company, 
of WiUiamsport, visited at the Women's 
College recently. 

Havard Griffith is pastor of the First 
Baptist Church, of Geneva, N. Y. His 
twin children, Mary Elizabeth and 
Havard Evan, were born on February 
29th and March 1, 1916. 

Elkanah Hulley built between Feb- 
ruary, 1919, and December, 1920, forty- 
seven houses in Pittsburgh. 

George Mattis is City Engineer for 
the city of Oakland, Cal. 

John L. Minor is assistant engineer 
in the Maintenance of Way Depart- 
ment of the Southern Pacific at Berke- 
ley, California. 

Edwin Wilde Saylor is an auditor with 
Stockwell, Wilson and Linville, Certi- 
fied Public Accountants, and resides at 
45 East Stewart avenue, Lansdowne, 
Pa. 

C. Harold Godshall, of Philadelphia, 
and Ernest Burrows, of Picture Rocks, 
visited their Alma Mater recently. 

1908 

S. Woods Caldwell is with the Kop- 
pers Co., engaged in production work 
at 804 Union Arcade, Pittsburgh. 

Paul G. Stolz is moving this month 
into the new residence he has pur- 
chased on Second street, in Lewisburg. 

The Rev. E. Carroll Condict is this 
faU doing research work at Harvard, 
studying the races of Burma in the De- 
partment of Ethnology, and the Origin 
and Development of Religion in the 
Divinity School. He is also taking 
work at Newton Theological Institute 
and a course in Missionary Sociology at 
Boston University School of Theology. 

Stephen G. Duncan is a bond and 
stock trader residing at 627 Wynnewood 
Road, Philadelphia. 

W. Stewart Duncan is Assistant 
Cashier of the Duncannon National 
Bank. 

Roy J. Farr is practicing law in Los 
Angeles, with headquarters at the Mer- 
chants' Trust Building, 

Henry Stephen Furst is a lawyer in 
Lock Haven. 

Ralph W. Haller is a teacher in the 
Brooklyn Boy's High School. 
1909 

Herman L. Brant is an accountant 
with the EUicott Square Co., of Buf- 
falo, N. Y., with headquarters at 650 
Ellicott Square. 

John Clyde Hostetter is a research 
chemist with the Corning Glass Works 
at their Steuben plant. 

Norman B. Gardner is inspector of 
coal storage, located at 25 Central ave- 
nue. South Braintree, Mass. 

Wilmer C. Johnson is engaged in real 
estate and insurance at Downingtown, 
Pa. 

B. M. Odgen, ex-'09, is a salesman 
with the Brinker Supply Co., of Pitts- 
burgh, located at 706 Park Building. 

Tola B. Quandt is Laboratory Tech- 
nician for Dr. F. J. Wagner at 415 Santa 
Monica Boulevard, Santa Monica, Cal. 



1910 

George F. Case is a partner in F. P. 
Case & Son, Troy, Pa. 

William H. Gatehouse is an account- 
ing clerk with the Baltimore and Ohio 
Railroad at Cumberland, Md. 

Emily A.Lane is assistant head worker 
in the College Settlement of Philadel- 
phia, residing at 502 South Front street, 
Philadielphia. 

Ruby G. Pierson is head of the Eng- 
lish department in the Bay View High 
School, Milwaukee, Wis. 

George B. Schroyer is Division Oper- 
ator with the Pennsylvania Railroad 
located in the Pennsylvania Building, 
Wilmington, Del. 

Florence V. Stauffer is teaching Eng- 
lish and French in the Perth Amboy, 
N. J. High School. 

Charles N. Brubaker is Assistant 
Managing Engineer for the General 
Electric Co., at Fort Wayne, Ind. 

Allan M. Fitch is a chemist with Wil- 
liam Cramp & Sons Ship and Engine 
Building Co., at Cramp's Ship Yard. 

Mrs. Arthur B. Fowler, formerly 
Katherine Bronson, is at present at 
Salem, N. J., having returned recently 
from Syria. 

Leroy McFarland is a teacher in the 
Mount Pleasant Academy at Ossining 
on Hudson, N. Y. 

The Rev. Frederick B. McAllister was 
recently compelled to give up his work 
in the First Baptist Church of New 
Castle because of ill health. 
1911 

Ellis C. Persing is head of the science 
department of the Glenville High 
School, in Cleveland, Ohio. 

John O. L. Roser is in sales engineer- 
ing with the General Electric Co. He 
resides at 36 Arlington street, Pittsfield, 
Mass. 

Paul J. Sanders is a teacher in the 
Batten High School, Elizabeth, N. J. 
and resides at 742 Floral avenue. 

Edgar A. Snyder is chief chemist with 
the General Electric Co., at Pittsfield, 
Mass., and resides at 22 Lincoln Ter- 
race. 

Howard W. Starkweather is research 
chemist with the DuPont's at Wilming- 
ton, residing at Woodstown, N. J. 
1912 

L. L. Coil is supervising principal of 
schools at Parksburg, Pa. 

Ralph F. Davenport is supervising 
principal of the Myerstown Borough 
schools at Myerstown, Pa. 

Ada Brooks Nancarrow is a member 
of the choir at the First Baptist Church 
at WiUiamsport. 

Merton M. Ogden returned in June 
from Peru where he had been in engi- 
neering work for D. P. Robinson & 
Co., of New York. He is now with the 
same company at 125 East 46th street. 
New York. 

Eva M. Rittenhouse is teaching Latin 
and English in the Scottdale High 
School. 

1913 

John R. Bogert is at present the 
Philadelphia representative of the Pitts- 
burgh Bridge and Iron Works, at 1209 
Widener Building. 

Hugh Max Bullard is lieutenant in 
the Medical Corps of the Regular Army 
located at Evacuation Hospital 3l, 
Staten Island. N. Y. 

Mi'es E. Dean is Superintendent of 
Schools at Martinsburg, Pa. 

"The Baptist" of recent date contain- 



ed an article in praise of the work of 
John D. W. Fetter as Baptist student 
pastor at Cornell. 

Marwood B. Glover is with the Na- 
tional Security Bank, of Philadelphia, 
and resides at 712 Andrews avenue, Col- 
lingsdale. 

Albert A. Jordan is at present located 
at 63 River street, Saranac Lake, N. Y. 
Lewis Carl Seabright is with Warren 
Webster & Co., of Cleveland, Ohio, as 
District Engineer. He is located at 706 
Rose Building. 

1914 
Lewis Henry Boyer is draftsman with 
the Pennsylvania State Highway De- 
partment at Harrisburg. 

Dale R. Angstadt pitched this sum- 
' mer for the American Steel and Tin 
Plate Co., at Vandergrift, Pa., and had 
a very successful season. 

Dr. F. H. Cathrall is Assistant Resi- 
dent in Gynecology and Surgery at the 
Johns Hopkins Hospital at Baltimore. 

Dayton T. Corson is civil enginer with 
the Corrugated Bar Co., Room 21, 
Transportation Building, Philadelphia. 

Robert J. Crane is a designer in the 
Designing Engineer's office for the New 
York Central Railroad at the Grand 
Central Terminal at New York. 

The Rev. Harold M. Dorrell has re- 
cently accepted the pastorate of the 
First Baptist Church of Lambertville, 
N. J. 

Robert W. Everall is works engineer 
with the National Malleable Castings 
Co., at Sharon. 

Mrs. Ruth Hoffa Frantz is teaching 
in the Lewisburg public schools. 

Joseph M. Hi'lman is a sales engineer 
with the AUis Chalmers Co., at Nor- 
wood, Ohio. 

Lewis F. Lyne, Jr., is owner and man- 
ager of the Oil Specialties & Supply 
Co., at 39 Courtland avenue. New York. 
He has a book in press entitled "Lubri- 
cation and Lubricants". He recently 
visited in Lewisburg. 

Ralph H. Moore is an accountant 
with the Peoples Natural Gas Co., of 
Pittsburgh. 

Thomas E. Moore is ranch foreman 
at Las Animas, Colo. 

Jesse E Riley is Principal of the New 
Martinsville, W. Va., High School. 
1915 
Joseph W. Aleshouckas is Aero Me- 
chanical Engineer with the Engineering 
Division Air Service, stationed at 
McCook Field at Dayton, Ohio. 

C. Warren Brown is teaching mathe- 
matics in LIniontown High School. 

Benjamin W. Laidlaw is foreman 
with Thomas A. Edison, Inc., at West 
Orange, N. J. 

Wi!mon Keiser, of Mount Carmel, is 
playing football with the Massillon 
Timers in Ohio. 

Ralph W. Frye is first helper with 
the Donora Steel Works at Donora, Pa. 
Rev. Harold S. Myatt is pastor of the 
C'ifford, Pa., Baptist Church. 

Charles Edgar Sellers is head of the 
science department at Loomis Insti-. 
tute. Windsor, Conn, 

Mark M. Walter is Supervisor of In- 
dustrial Education for the Merchant's 
Shipbuilding Co.. at Harriman, Pa. He 
was married April 2, 1920 to Miss Irma 
G. Betz. 

John M. Wingert is a chemist in the 
Laboratory of the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road at Altoona. 

(Continued on Page 10) 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



"•"•"••■•"••■••■•"••••"•••••••••< 



..•..•..•»•..•»•..•'■< 



»••••••••••»•••< 



About the Hill 



CONCERNING PUBLICITY 



Representative Undergraduates 



The Alumni who wonder from time 
to time why there is not more Buck- 
ne'A "dope" in the papers, now that the 
college maintains a News Service, are 
justified in their curiosity. For their 
information, the following statement is 
submitted: 

The plan of operation last year was 
as follows: Bucknell news of general in- 
terest was sent out in weekly "newslet- 
ters", and "sportsletters" mailed to a 
list of about one hundred papers. The 
"newsletters" contained stories of cur- 
rent happenings of scholastic or social 
events, the activities of college organi- 
zations and the like. The "sportslet- 
ters" reported seasonable athletic news. 
These letters were in general so timed 
as to be available for the enlarged Sat- 
urday or Sunday editions, although 
"special" letters were sent out as oc- 
casion demanded. 

Reports of local athletic events and 
news of great importance were tele- 
graphed to a small list of city papers. 

Personal items on individuals in the 
faculty and student body were, mailed 
to the papers of the home towns of the 
individuals in question. 

Practically the same procedure will be 
followed this year, except that it is 
planned to develop still further the in- 
dividual service, and that the athletic 
publicity, under the supervision of Mr. 
Glass, is being developed. 

However, getting the news to the 
papers is not the same as getting it in 
them, as any newspaperman knows. A 
failure to catch a certain train may ut- 
terly ruin the value of a mailed news- 
letter as news and a slight delay in the 
transmission of a telegram may entirely 
keep it out of a morning paper. 

In general, the newsletters and sports- 
letters have fared well. They have, of 
course, been frequently cut down and 
edited by individual papers to suit the 
local news-value and space. The papers 
of cities where we have active and 
numerous Alumni naturally feature 
them most. But the sportsletters usu- 
ally appear even in the big city papers, 
though often cut down very greatly. 

The telegraphic news is harder to 
handle. Lewisburg has only "small- 
town" telegraph service, and the tele- 
graphic reports of local games are often 
delayed. 

During the baseball season, games fre- 
quently ran late, and it was necessary 
(Continued on Page Twelve) 



Victor G. Clare prepared for college 
at MiUville, N. J., High School. He 
served in the Bucknell Unit, S. A. T, C, 
and has taken part in class football, 
baseball and basketball. He has been 




Victor Gordon Clare, '21 

active in various business positions, and 
is now Business Manager of the Buck- 
nellian. 

He is a member of the Chemical Engi- 
neering Society and Lambda Chi Alpha 
Fraternity. 

Mr. Clare is anxious to build up a 
large Alumni subscription list for the 
Bucknellian, and will be glad to mail 
back numbers to any alumnus who 
wishes to be placed on the mailing list. 
® 

HILL AND BURG 



David J. Martin, '20; Walter D. Roos, 
'20; Harry L. Nancarrow, '20, and 
Stephen Dimlich, '20, attended the Ur- 
sinus game. 

H. C. Thompson, '08, visited his 
brother, R. W. Thompson, '04, recently 
on his return from the Presbyterian 
Synod meeting at Wilkes-Barre. Mr. 
Thompson is organizing courses in sur- 
veying and mechanical drawing at 
Geneva College. 

Elthera Corson, '20, was back over 
the week-end of October 30. 

Edward Parke, '12, visited friends in 
town recently. 

Harry McCormick, ex-'04, and George 
Cockill, '05, were looking over the team 
.during its preparations for Lafayette. 

Aileen Johnston Connelly, '17, spent 
several days with Professor and Mrs. 
W. E. Martin. 

"Andy" Sable, '11, was back for the 
opening of college. 

Judge Voris Auten, of Mt. Carmel, 
witnessed the Ursinus game October 9. 

Stephen Dimlich, '20; James Pettite, 
'19; R. S. Kyle, '20; W. E. C. Speare, 
'20, and L. T, Botts, 20, returned to see 
the St. Bonaventure game. 



THE NEW FACULTY 

Bucknell opened this fall with a 
largely increased instructional force to 
meet the foreseen needs of the year. 

Professor Amos L. Herold, a gradu- 
ate of Washington and Lee, with gradu- 
ate work there and at Columbia, and 
teachmg: experience at the University 
of Cincinnati and Columbia, occupies 
the chair of English Literature. 

Professor E. Belfort S. de Magalhaes, 
with a baccalaureate degree from Sj/en- 
cer College, Bahia, Brazil, collegiate 
work in Richmond and Ewing Col- 
leges, graduate work at Colgate, Vir- 
ginia, Harvard and Columbia, and ser- 
vice with the Pan-American Union, 
comes from Lafayette to a professor- 
ship in the Department of Romance 
Languages. 

Professor Genevieve Boland is a 
graduate of the University of Maine 
with A.M. and Ph.D. degrees from' 
Clark University. She has travelled ex- 
tensively and taught in Centenary Col- 
lege, Elizabeth College, Adrian College 
and Hamlin College. She teaches 
French and Spanish. 

Miss Olive Douglass, a graduate of 
Temple University, has been added to 
the faculty in Household Economics. 

Mr, B. J, Wilson, a Bucknell gradu- 
ate of the class of 1919, returns as in- 
structor in Mechanical Engineering 
after practical work with the Bethlehem 
Steel Co. 

Mr. George A. Irland, Sc.B. in E.E., 
from Bucknell, and later with the Beth- 
lehem Steel Corporation, returns to 
take a place as instructor in Electrical 
Engineering. 

Mr. J. S. Gold and Mr. George Lowry, 
both Bucknell graduates, are added to 
the Mathematics Department, while 
Mr. Herbert Greenland enters the Eng- 
lish Department as Instructor in 
Rhetoric. 

® 

GLEE CLUB PLANS 



Manager Ralph Hartz, of the Com- 
bined Musical Clubs, still has a few 
open dates on his trips, and will be glad 
to correspond with any organization 
which may wish to engage the Clubs 
for a concert. 

Several tours are being planned, and 
those interested are urged to get in 
touch with Mr. Hartz before dates are 
definitely closed. 

With a wide range of new material to 
choose from, and the nucleus of last 
year's splendid organization remaining, 
the Clubs hope to develop an even bet- 
ter chorus than last year. Already the 
Glee Club and Orchestra have largely 
chosen their repertoire, and are now 
practicing almost daily to perfect their 
rendering of the programs to be pre- 
sented. 

® 

Boyd Newcomb, who captained the 
League Island team, while in the ser- 
vice, was on the athletic field to train 
the line men early in the season. 



10 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



WHAT'S BECOME OF 1920? 

What of the Class of 1920? After the 
15th of June, 1920, were there one hun- 
dred and thirty-eight men and women 
completely swallowed up in the whirl 
and rush of events that have come 
since then? If not, what has become 
of those members of last year's gradu- 
ating class? Where have they gone? 
And what are they doing? All the facts 
that we would like to know are not 
here, but at least we learn that instead 
of being swallowed in the whirl, they 
are making their mark, and that in 
many and diverse ways. Besides the 
fact that their work lies in fields that 
range from the scholastic to rough and 
hard labor the members of the class 
have spread themselves over all portions 
of the United States, and one has even 
ventured to Scotland to see how some 
others of the world are living. 

The following table has been prepared 
in order to get a comprehensive idea 
of the lines of activity of the entire 
class. These figures are approximate, 
since it was not possible to get the data 
upon the entire class. 

Percentage of the Class in Definite 
Lines of Activity 

Teaching (Preparatory and Col- 
legiate) 46% 

Advanced Training 16% 

Chemical Engineering 6% 

Electrical Engineering 7% 

Civil Engineering 2% 

Industrial Engineering 7% 

Business 14% 

Mechanical Engineering 6% 

Social Welfare Work 1% 

Traveling 2% 

Married (among the women only) . . 1% 

It is surprising to learn that such a 
large number of the 1920 class has gone 
into the profession of teaching. The 
entire number totals forty-six. The 
following are the names of those who 
have taken up teaching: Ruth P. Clark, 
Elthera G. Corson, Marion Ellenbogen, 
Marion K. Goho, Elizabeth N. Patter- 
son, Evelyn G. Powell, Helen Reed, Mar- 
ion Riess, Pauline Schenck, Frances 
Ada MacFarland, English; Marguerite I. 
Quigley, Modern Languages; Anna Leila 
Sterling, Domestic Science and History, 
Meshoppen, Pa.; Helen M. Walton, 
English; Margaret Brown, Orbisanny 
Falls High School, New York, English, 
French and History; Cecil Lynch, 
Glassboro High School, General Sci- 
ence; Margaret Sipley, Laceyville High 
School, French and General Science ; 
Thirza May Bromley, Chloe Pearl 
Crossley, Edith Amanda Gardner, Adda 
Hayman, Agnes Hoffman, Louisa How- 
ells, Margaret Helen Trump, Adelia 
Wilkes, Thomas J. S. Heim, Williams- 
port High School, History and Algebra ; 
Julius Seebach, St. Johns Military 
Academy, French; Harry R. Warfel, St. 
Johns Military Academy, English; 
Katherine Ellen Johnson, Lock Haven 
High School, French and English ; Char- 
lotte Volkmar, Milton High School, 
Mathematics and English; Evan W. 
Ingram, Tome School, History and Eng- 
lish; Walter D. Roos, WiUiamsport 
High School, English; Merrill W. 
Brown, Renovo High School, Biology; 
Ralph M. Dyer, Penn Argyl High School, 
Science; Henry U. Heckart, Lewisburg 
High School; Irvin Valentine Holmes, 
Kane High School, Mathematics; Glenn 



E. Ott, Phillipsburg High School, Al- 
gebra and English; Orville Clyde Wrig- 
ley; Lewis A. Eaton, Lincoln Univer- 
sity, Chemistry; Herbert Clair Green- 
land, Instructor in English, BuckneU 
University; George L. Lowry, Instruc- 
tor in Mathematics, Bucknell Univer- 
sity; Charles W. Miller, Olean High 
School, New York, Mathematics; Ray- 
mond W. Copeland, Keystone Academj', 
History and Mathematics; Raymond 
Crossgrove, Sunbury High School; Wil- 
lard L. Lewis, ConneUsvUle High School, 
History and Science ; Russell R. Stout, 
Blair Academy; Dorothy Villinger, 
Spanish, Penn Yan, N. Y. 

Of those that have chosen to go fur- 
ther with their studies, law seems to 
have claimed the most of them. Mark 
Reuben Everett, Fellowship at Harvard, 
Chemistry; Henry M. Weber, Jefferson 
Medical College; Henry Clay Lucas, 
Bucknell; Winfield Scott Masters, Buck- 
nell; Harold E. Miller, Bucknell; Felix 
Piekarski, Pennsylvania Law School; 
Charles M. Emerick, Western Reserve 
Law School; George A. Smith, Western 
Reserve Law School; Robert K. Bell, 
Pennsylvania Law School; Mary K. 
Glover, Drexel Institute; Miller A. 
Piekarski, Pennsylvania Law School; 
Ethyle Culbert, Bacteriological Labor- 
atory, University of Pennsylvania. 

One man has chosen to take news- 
paper work. Hayes L. Person is with 
the Baltimore Sun. 

• Wm. E. C. Speare is with the Lycom- 
ing Rubber Co., of Williamsport; James 
C. Craig is at present in Scotland. 

The remainder of the class have en- 
gaged in business or engineering, and 
are working in various parts of the 
country. These men are: LeRoy E. 
Heckendom, American Telegraph and 
Telephone Co.; Walter L. Lees, Leech- 
burg; J. Edward Robbins, Inspection of 
Tractor Machinery, Cleveland, Ohio; 
George P. Little, Insurance, Montrose; 
Daniel R. Steele, International Banking 
Co., Chicago; Leslie H. Campbell, 
Chemical Works, Clairetown; Emil W. 
Holinger, Draftsman, Acme Co., New 
York; Harry J. Wagoner, Bethlehem 
Steel, Bethlehem; Andrew R. Mathie- 
son. Safety Dept., Carnegie Steel, Johns- 
town; James A. Pangburn, Lumber Co., 
Elizabeth; Archibald Ripple, Oil Co., 
Oklahoma; Lambert T. Botts, General 
Chemical Co., New York; Stephen L. 
Dimlich, Atlas Powder Co., Stamford, 
Conn.; Joseph D. Dent, National 
City Bank, New York City; Chas. 
B. Moore, International Banking Co., 
New York City; Hiram J. Wag- 
oner, Western Electric, New York City ; 
George Walter Lees, Bell Telephone Co., 
Harrisburg; Robert N. Waddell, Beck- 
with Machine Co., Pittsburgh; Herbert 
S. DeLong, Sales Dept., American Car 



and Foundry Co., Milton; David J. 
Martin, Lycoming Rubber Co., Wil- 
Hamsport; H. J. Hann, Electric Co., 
Milton; Errol H. Derby, I. C. S., Scran- 
ton; Ernest W. Hewitt, Edison Lamp 
Co., Newark, N. J.; EcJward Clinton 
Kolb, BeU Telephone Co., Philadelphia; 
Llewellyn Jones, Edison Lamp Co., 
Newark, N. J.; Robert S. Kyle, Bald- 
win Locomotive Co., Philadelphia; John 
A. Mason, Niagara Power Co., Buffalo; 
Stephen F. Puff, Electrical Engineer, 
American Telephone and Telegraph 
Co., Philadelphia; William J. Rolfe, 
Edison Lamp Co., Scranton; Furman 
W. Shaw, Jewelry Business, Camden; 
Lester E. Herb, Research Dept. General 
Electric Co.; Robert Smith, Lock 
Haven Dye Works, Lock Haven, 
James Waldron, Edison Lamp Co., New 
ark, N. J.; George N. Benjamin, bond 
salesman, Philadelphia; Robert B. 
Faust, Oil Co., Bartolville, Oklahoma; 
Julius O. Fraker, Standard Oil Co., 
New York City; Morris D. Hooven, 
Radio Dept., Westinghouse; Clarence 
H. Pontius, Automobile Business, Sun- 
bury; D wight W. Rude, Waymart; 
George W. VanDyke, Government 
Work, Washington, D. C; Dawson F. 
Bloom, Atlas Powder Co., Stamford, 
Conn.; Leslie H. Campbell, Chemical 
Engineer, Clayton; Anthony A. Sch- 
wenkler. Atlas Powder Co., Stamford, 
Conn; Nelson E. Chance, Standard Oil 
Co., New Jersey; Charles V. Iredell, 
Sugar Refining Co., Colorado; Sidney 
J. Peale, BeU Telephone Co., Philadel- 
phia; Robert C. Umlauf, Richards 
Mfg. Co.; Vincent P. Connelly, Drafts- 
man, American Bridge Co., Philadel- 
phia; Donald W. Korth, Division of 
Highways, State of Illinois; Harry L. 
Nancarrow, Pennsylvania R. R., Harris- 
burg; Theodore C. Williams, U. S. Cast 
Iron Pipe Foundry, Beverly, N. J.; 
John N. Bauman, Standard Steel Co., 
Butler; Lester E. Lighton, Exide Stor- 
age Battery Co., Detroit; Warren H. 
Slocum, Eastman Kodak Co., Rochester, 
N. Y.; Paul Stolz, American Engineer- 
ing Co. 

Four of the class may be found at 
Crozer Theological Seminary, where 
they are putting in further study, pre- 
paratory to entering the ministry. 
These men are: Elton P. Richards, 
George Ewan Gaskill; Henry L. D. 
Moore; Charles A. Reed. 



TELL US WHAT YOU THINK 
OF IT 

If you don't like the new form of 
the MONTHLY, let us know. But 
if you DO like it, LET US KNOW 
BY ALL MEANS. 

If you can suggest any improve- 
ments send them along. If you can 
think of none, tell us so. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



11 



ORANGE AND BLUE 



With Kpirit. 




1. Hail 

2. Hail 



to 
to 



the col 
the col 



ors 

OX'S 



tliat iish. 
tlie rain. 



* 



i. 



er the morn - ing, 
bow bends o'er us, 



Or 

Or 



=t: 



ange and 
ange and 



-«_i_ 



blue 
blue 



m 
in 

-#- 



the 
its 

-•- 



gates 
arch 



-H 



of 
es 






the 
of 



^ 



day; 
light; 



Sing 
Sing 



to 
to 



tEL 



the jol - 
the Btars 



ors 

as 



the 
they 



=^- 



4=i^ 



— I- 



sun 
ride 



set 
on 



a - dorn 
be -fore 
js- A- 



ing; Or - ange and blue 
us, Or - ange and blue 



lead the ma ^ch- less 
in the glim. - mer 



ar - ray. 

ing night. 



^ 



It 



~^-' 



^ 



-1=- 



1 



CHORU; 






^- 



=^-*=J=F^-^ 



3»- 



^z 



^ 



4=^ 



w 



Hold up the col-ox's of Bucknell on high, Or-ange and blue, till they daz - zle the eye; 



It 



=t: 



^ 



± 



It: 



-12- 



It 



=t 



^ 



Itl 



a:: 



^E. 



^^^ 



le 



K 



Shout for old Buck-nell, mer - ry old Buck-nell, Ring out her sky - roek-et 



-A r: 



±= 






'v'^- 



cry. 



I 



3 Sing to the colors that dance in the waters, 

Orange and blue where the bright ripples play; 

Sing to fair Bucknell, her sons and her daughters, 

Orange and blue in the thick of the fray. — Cho. 

4 Sing to the maidens who live in her story ; 

Brimming blue eyes in our visions we see ; 
Sing to the gridiron's mad battle for glory, 
Orange and blue in the wild vidlory. — Cho. 



12 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



PERSONALS 



1916 

Norman Jacob Rehman is engineer- 
ing assistant with the New York Tele- 
phone Co., at 104 Broad street. New 
York. 

Jerome C. Salsbury is teaching his- 
tory at the Bloomfield, N. J. High 
School. 

Homer M. Sanders has charge of 
science and athletics at Union High 
School at Turtle Creek. 

R. J. W. Templin is an instructor in 
mathematics at Lafayette College. 

Shailer Ventres is in the mathematics 
department of the Clearfield High 
School. 

1917 

Lieutenant Donald Ross Dunkle has 
recently returned from Panama, where 
he was an aide-de-camp on the staff of 
Major General Kennedy. 

Nellylou Gadner is teaching in the 
English department of the Roselle, N. J., 
High School. 

Sarah Alice Haslam is assistant head 
worker of Neighborhood House for the 
New Jersey Zinc Co., at Palmerton. 

Henrietta Heinsling is teaching his- 
tory in the Juniata High School. 
. Elizabeth Boyd Lehr has been since 
July, a teacher in the Educational and 
Recreational School at Camp Dix, N. J. 

Henry T. Lofft is a timekeeper with 

the George Kessler Co., of Camden, 

N.J. 

1918 

Ralph W. Beard is supervising princi- 
pal of the Portage, Pa., High School. 

Claude Oliver Boothroyd is station- 
ary engineer with the Good Shepherd 
Hospital, of Syracuse, N. Y. 

David N. Boswell is pastor of the 
Nunda, N. Y. Baptist Church. 

J. McKee Jones is principal of graded 
schools at Dormont. 

Charles Andrew Kissell is supervising 
principal of schools at Duncannon, Pa. 

Elizabeth Stephens is physical direc- 
tor of the Scotia, N. Y., public schools. 
1919 

Margaret Elizabeth Allen is a teacher 
in the Watsontown High School. 

Ernest Judson Cruse is a clerk with 
the Overland Harrisburg Co., of Har- 
risburg. 

Emerson C. Cupp is a research chem- 
ist in process investigations for the 
General Chemical Co., at Marcus Hook, 
Pa. 

Chester R. Leaber is at present home, 
preparatory to a trip to Panama for the 
International Banking Co. 

George A. Starkweather is a chemist 
with the General Chemical Co., at 
Marcus Hook. 

Nathan Teitelbaum is a candidate for 
• a Ph.D. in history and political science 
at the University of Pennsylvania. 




CONCERNING PUBLICITY 



David H. Stewardson, '21 

David H. Stewardson prepared for 
college at Lincoln High School, Jersey 
City. He entered Bucknell in the Bio- 
logical course, preparing for medicine. 
He served in Bucknell unit, S. A. T. C, 
and has been in college a member of 
the Glee Club, Cap and Dagger and the 
L'Agenda Board. 

For two years he has served on the 
Y. M. C. A. cabinet, and was selected 
this year as President of that organi- 
zation. He is a member of Kappa Sigma 
fraternity. 

® 

WEDDINGS 



Bailey-Moyle 

Miss Helen Moyle, '20, was married 
October 5, 1920, to Mr. Theodore L. 
Bailey. They will reside at 7816 Lex- 
ington avenue, Cleveland, Ohio. 

ElUott-Parker 

Miss Mae Russell Parker, of Lock 
Haven, was married Saturday, June 28, 
to Reynolds Frampton Elliott, ex-'17. 
They are residing at 1545 North Red- 
field street, Philadelphia. Samuel Rick- 
ard, '23, was best man at the wedding.' 

During the war Mr. Eliott served in 
the Navy and was assigned to aviation 
when the armistice was effected. 
Frost-Furman 

Miss Sarah C. Furman, '06, was mar- 
ried July 10, 1920, to Mr. Alvah G. 
Frost. They reside at 654 King street, 
Port Chester, N. Y. 

Replogle-Wickum 

Miss Elizabeth Wickum, ex-'22, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Wick- 
um, of Altoona, was married October 
6, to Dr. Henry Brown Replogle. They 
will be at home after November 1, at 
331 Seventh avenue, Altoona. 
Thomas-McFarland 

Miss Jessie McFarland, '05, daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. J. Z. McFarland, of 
Watsontown, was married October 23, 
1920, to Mr. Walter H. Thomas. They 
will be at home after November 15, at 
2201 Broad avenue, Altoona, Pa. 



(Continued from Page Nine) 
to telephone the report to the Wil- 
liamsport or Harrisburg Western Union 
offices, because of the impossibility of 
having them handled at the local office. 
.\t Commencement conditions were 
especially bad, because of congestion at 
the Lewisburg office, which had as a 
result, abnormal delays in transmission. 
For instance the report of the bac- 
calaureate sermon, though delivered to 
Western Union early Sunday afternoon, 
did not get through in time for use by 
Philadelphia morning papers. On Tues- 
day, a telegraphic request from a Phila- 
delphia paper for a feature story on 
Alumni Day was not delivered to the 
News Office until late in the evening, 
and though sent out as soon as possible, 
appeared only in the late edition of the 
paper. 

Conditions in Pittsburgh have for a 
long time been unfavorable to Buck- 
nell. Bucknell is out of the immediate 
Pittsburgh district, and it has been felt 
there are not enough Bucknell Alumni 
in the vicinity to make it worth while 
for the papers to feature Bucknell stuff. 
Besides, for several years Bucknell has 
had no games in Pittsburgh. Older 
Alumni will recall other factors. For 
some time, however, live Pittsburgh 
Alumni have been working on this 
problem, and conditions are rapidly im- 
proving. 

It must be borne in mind also that 
Bucknell is one of more than thirty col- 
leges in Pennsylvania alone, each of 
which is anxious for space, and when it 
is observed that certain colleges seem 
more successful in obtaining space, it 
will usually be observed also that there 
is usually a reason for this in their 
geographical situation, their size, or 
some other condition which gives their 
stories unusual news value. 

A great deal can be done by the 
Alumni themselves in improving the 
service if they will inquire at the offices 
of their local papers whether they get 
Bucknell stuff. In case they do not, 
the News Office will be glad to place 
them on its mailing list. 

Of course, those alumni who are 
themselves in the newspaper game have 
been cooperating to the extent of their 
influence, and to them we owe a great 
deal in making a number of papers 
very kindly disposed to Bucknell. 

All this is set forth, not as an "alibi", 
because the News Office realizes fully 
that its service is not perfect, but to 
acquaint the Alumni with the actual 
news program, and to invite their co- 
operation in improving it. Criticisms 
and suggestions will be very gladly re- 
ceived and, if possible, acted upon. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



13 



G. J. B. Schuyler, Editor 



V. G. Clare, Business Manager 



THE BUCKNELLIAN 



1^ 



The complete issue for the year, including back numbers, of this college weekly newspaper will be sent to you, 
(postpaid), upon receipt of the regular subscription price,- $1.50. Make check payable to 

V. G. CLARE, % The Bucknellian, Lewisburg, Pa. 



Teachers for 
Schools 



Schools for 
Teachers 



NATIONAL TEACHERS' AGENCY, Inc. 

D. H. Cook, Mgr., 326-27-28 Perry Bldg., 1530 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
"I HAVE PROMOTED OVER 15,000 TEACHERS. WHY NOT YOU?"— D. H. Cook. 

Bucknell Graduates Wanted. Have Placed Hundreds of Them 



Under.the Same Management Thirty- 
Seven Years 
The School Bulletin Teachers' 
Agency has on its lists many Buck- 
nell graduates, and has placed Buck- 
nell men and women in high and nor- 
mal schools in New York, New Jer- 
sey, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, 
Vermont, Kentucky, West Virginia 
and Texas. An agency which per- 
sonally recommends its members to 
places for which it has been asked 
to offer candidates. Registration 
blanks and full information on re- 
quest. 
C. W. Bardeen, Mgr., Syracuse, N. Y. 



Place your order now for the 

illustrated 
BUCKNELL 

SOUVENIR 

CALENDAR 
For 1921 
Sent postpaid for 
$1.25 



A. R. MAHONEY, '23, 

Phi Kappa Psi House, 

Lewisburg, Pa. 



MOORE BUILDING 
SUPPLY CO. 

Milton, Pa. 

Distributors, of 

All Kinds of Building 
Material 

Agents for 

Johns-Manville Co, 



BUCKINELL UINIVERSITV 

EMORY W. HUNT, D. D., LL. D., PRESIDENT 

Alumni : Help us maintain and increase a waiting list of applicants for admission by filling 
out the blanks below: 

B. F. Thomas, Registrar. 
Dear Sir: — 

Please send information about 



B. F. Thomas, Registrar. 

Dear Sir: — 

The following are prospective 
college students of the first rank and 
should be on Bucknell's roll next fall. 
I recommend them on the basis of 
scholarship and leadership. 



Signed 



.Arts Courses 
..Preparation for Ministry 
. .Preparation for Teaching 
. .Preparation for Law 
. .Preparation for Medicine 
..Preparation for Business 
. .Preparation for Social Work 
. . Mechanical Engineering 
..Electrical Engineering 
. . Civil Engineering 
. . Chemical Engineering 
. .Science Courses 
. .School of Music 
. .General Catalog 
. .Campus Views 
. .Expenses 

. . Application for Admission 
To 



Signed 



Established, 1892 
First Instruction, 1853 



BUCKNELL UNIVERSITY 



11 Teachers 
177 Pupils 



THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC 



Emory W. Hunt, Pres. 
Paul G. Stolz, '08, Director 

The Supervisor's Course in the School of Music is based on Commonwealth requirements, and students com- 
pleting the course are exempt from examination. 



COURSES: 



Piano, 


4 yrs. 


Vlolincello, 


4 yrs. 


Voice, 4 yrs. 


Orchestra 


Pipe Organ, 


4 yrs. 


Contrabass, 


4 yrs. 


Teachers' Course, 4 yrs. 


History 


Violin, 


4 yrs. 


Viola 




Harmony, 
Theory. 


Oratorio 
Opera 



14 



These Lewisburg Firms Support the Monthly ; Patronize Them. 



COLLEGE IIVIV 

Inseparably Linked With Life "On the Hill" 
GOOD EATS AND GOOD TIMES, THE LAW AND PROPHETS OF OUR MENU 



"ON THE QUADRANGLE" 



PAYNE, '09 



Lewisburg Trust 
and Safe Deposit Co. 

Commenced Business 1907. 

CAPITAL $125,000 

SURPLUS AND PROFITS, 87,000 
DEPOSITS 1,025,000 

Your Business 
Solicited, 

Appreciated, 

and Protected 

DANIEL F. GREEN, Treas. 

Renew Your Acquaintance With 

"The Purity Special" Sundae. 

Take home with you a box of our 

HOMEMADE CANDY. 

THE PURITY 
W. A. BLAIR 

FRESH AND SMOKED MEATS 

Wholesaler of Pork, Sausage, etc. 

Fancy and Staple Groceries 

OYSTERS IN SEASON. 

J. FRED ZELLER 

J EWELER and 
OPTOMETRIST 



J. C. REEDY 

Dealer In 

Furniture ana Carpets 

530 Market Street 

SHIELDS 

Photographic 
Studio 

Distinctive Stationery 

AT 

BAKER'S PHARMACY 

DELMAR INN 



A. J. DUNKLE, Prop. 



WAIN IBS 

Opposite the Trust Co. 
The Home of 

HOMEMADE ICE CREAM 
Lunchenette and Parlor 

"GRADS". Your Mail Orders for 

Bucknell or Fraternity Felt and 

Leather Goods will receive our 

Prompt and Careful Attention. 

H. F. DONEHOWER 

"Varsity Outfitter" 

W. L. DONEHOWER, '06, Mgr. 

JAS. P. BENNETT 

Local and 
Long Distance Hauling 



Phone 84 



Lewisburg 



University Book 
Store 

Books, Stationery 
and School Supplies 

Mail Orders Promptly 
Attended to 

We Pay Postage 

WE WANT YOUR SHIRTS 

Mail 'em in 

Peerless Laundry 

Thompson, '04. Donehower, '06 

Milton Lewisburg Sunbury 

E. C. NOLL 

THE 
FEED MAN 

DR. E. S. HEISER 

DRUGGIST 
Developing and Printing 

IREV'S 
SHOE STORE 

A. J. Irey, '79. 



Union National Bank 

strong Capital and Surplus 

Government Supervision 

IVIember Federal Reserve 



Employees Acquainted with 
Business and College World. 



SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES 

SAVINGS DEPARTMENT 

TRAVELERS' CHECKS 



John K. Kremer, Cashier. 

RAEZER'S 

Casn and Carry Groceries 
Lewisburg and Milton. 

H. J. Nogel & Bro. 

Jeweler ana Optometrist 

Lewisburg, Pennsylvania 

Engraving Watch Repairing 

GRENOBLE BROS. 

University Jewelers 

Exclusive Columbia Agents 

STEININGER CAFE 

Open 6 a. m. to 1.30 a. m. 

Rooms With Hot and Cold Running 

Water 

GEO. E. IRVIN, Mgr. 

Third & Market St., Lewisburg, Pa. 

Herman & Leiser 

Dry Goods, Notions, and 

Ladies' Ready-to-Wear 

Apparel. 



W. C. Walls, 
Pres. 



John W. Bucher, 
Cash. 



The Lewisburg National Bank 

The oldest Bank in Union County. 
Established 1853. Capital $100,000. 
Surplus and Profits 8100,000. 3% In- 
terest paid on Savings Accounts. 

HILL'S DRUG STORES 

2 Stores 2 
Lewisburg, Penna. 



Transact Your Business In Lewisburg Through Our Advertisers, 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



15 



The Alumni Business and Professional 

Directory 

During the past le-^v years over five nunared (500) Bucknell Students liave taken 
out Lire Insurance policies with tne Equitable Life of Iowa. Successful men invari- 
ably are men ■wno, in early years, realized tne value of life insurance. 

Life Insurance makes for Success 

Tyson, '11 RICE ^ TYSON, Gen. Agts., 906 Kunkel Bldg., Harrisburg, Pa. 



Andrew Leiser, Andrew Leiser, Jr., 
U. at L., '69 B. U., '98, Yale, 99 


G. F. RASSWEILER 

Professor of Public Speaking, 


WM. R. FOLLMER 


Law Offices of 


BUCKNELL UNIV. 


ATTORNEY-AT-LAW 


Andrew Albright Leiser 


Dramatic Reader, Lecturer, and 


Notary in Office 


Andrew Albright Leiser, Jr. 


Entertainer. For Dates and Terms, 




Lewisburg-, Union County 


address 106 S. 7th St., Lewisburg. 




Pennsylvania 


Phone 141-R-2. 


Lewisburg Pennsylvania 


H. B. WEAVER, "14 


Ralph L. Belford, '05 


Jobn F. Winkelblecb, '14 


Catalogs, Yearbooks, House 






Organs. 




Invest in a Farm! 




Attorney-at-Law 


E. A. STROUT FARM AGENCY 


THE PITTSBURGH PRINT- 




Knows the Good Ones, 


ING CO. 




Advertises and Sells Them. 


530 Fernando St., 






Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 


Milton, Pa. 


Phone 113R8 Lewisburg, Pa. 



THIS SPACE AWAITS 



Your Business or Professional 

Card 

Send it in by tne first of December for insertion for the rest of tne year. 
Subscription is included in tbe terms below. 



Tnis Directory is now oeing arranged. Get in on it early. 



ADVERTISING RATES 

One Insertion 4 Times 8 Times 

1 inch deep, 1 column: $1.00 |3.50 $6.50 

1 inch deep, 3 columns: 3.00 10.00 18.00 

% page 6-00 22.50 42.00 

% page 9.00 33.00 62.50 

Full page 15.00 57.50 110.00 

2% discount for cash within 30 days. Copy due first of each month. 

2,100 Circulation last year. 

Send your ad. to 

H. S. EVERETT, Advertising Mgr., 

Lewisburg, Pa. 



16 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 







Tnis IS a nurried ^vorld. 








Brief sermons satisfy us — h 


ut not brief plays. 






You and 1 like our sweetmeats in bulky form ; our 






quinine in a capsule. 








The advantage of our service is tLat Mve do not skimp 






our customers on -wnat they want. 






In supplying your printing 


needs, -svnetber they be small 






or great, we liave but one 


policy — you must he satispea. 




s 


un Printing ^ 


iJinaing Co., Inc. 






MVilliamsport, Pa. 






Printers of Tbe 


Alumni Montbly 



OPPORTUNITIES 



THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION NEEDS ONE 

THOUSAND MEMBERS. FILL OUT THIS 

COUPON AND SEND TO THE 

TREASURER 

F. M. Simpson,' Treas, 

The Alumni Association, 

Bucknell University, 

Lewisburg, Pa. 

Enclosed find $...' , to cover Alumni Associa- 
tion membership as indicated by check mark below: 

Annual Membership for 1920-21 $2.50 

(Including Alumni Monthly) 

Life Membership 25.00 

Name ■. Class 



Address 



FOR BUCKNELL UNIVERSITY 

In consideration of other pledges to the 1920 Funds 
of One Million Dollars for endowment, and Five Hun- 
dred Thousand Dollars for equipment, I hereby sub- 
scribe and promise to pay 

Dollars 



each year for five years, beginning.. 



.1920 



Signed 



Address 



Dated 1920 

Payable to JOHN T. JUDD, Treasurer, Letnsburg, Pa. 

Payments may be made in Bonds, Mortgages, 

Stocks and Notes 



J 



Bucknell Alumni Monthly 



Vol.V 



Lewisburg, Pa., December, 1920 



No. 3 




HOWARD MALCOM, D. D., LL. D. 

PRESIDENT 1851-59 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



Bucknell Alumni Monthly 

LEO L. ROCKWELL, '07, 
Editor 
H. S. EVERETT, '12, 
Advertising Manager 

Published monthly during the college 
year by the BuckneU University 
Alumni Association. 

Entered as second-class mail matter 
at the Postoffice at Lewisburg, Pa., 
under the act of Congress, March 3, 
1879. 

Annual subscription to non-members, 
$2.00. 

To life members under the SIO plan, 
$1.50. 

To life members under the new plan, 
it is sent gratis. 

To annual members under the new 
plan, subscription is included in the 
annual dues. 

Checks should be made payable to 
Frank M. Simpson, Treas. 



A CARD OF THANKS 

AND EXPLANATION 



The MONTHLY expresses its thanks 
to those alumni who have been so 
thoughtful as to remit promptly the 
subscription price. "Bis dat, qui cito 
dat". 

In answer to a few who are still in- 
quiring as to this year's terms, we 
wish to repeat them. 

For life members of the general 
Alumni Association, under the old plan, 
that is, those who obtained membership 
by the payment of So or SIC, the sub- 
scription price is S1.50. 

To those who become life members 
under the new plan, by the payment 
of S25, the magazine will be sent gratis. 

For those who take out annual mem- 
bership under the new terms, by pay- 
ment of S2.50, the subscription price is 
included in this annual fee. 

For non-members of the Alumni As- 
sociation the subscription price is S2. 
This rate is intended primarily for non- 
alumni, for undergraduates, friends, and 
others. Of these we already have a num- 
ber on our subscription list. 

We should prefer that all alumni, 
whether graduates or non-graduates, 
who are not already members of the 
General Association, take out annual 
membership. This will entitle them to 
a vote in the annual business meeting, 
and to the other privileges of member- 
ship. Of course, any preferring not to 
join the General Association may take 
advantage of the S2 rate. 

All checks for subscription should be 
made payable to Frank M. Simpson, 
Treasurer of the Alumni Association. 



CAN YOU HELP? 

The Alumni Office is making the be- 
ginning of a collection of historical ma- 
terial connected with Bucknell and 
Bucknellians. Despite its present 
cramped quarters, it will endeavor to 
take good care of all such material con- 
tributed until the day of removal into 



the "Alumni Memorial Hall", in which 
it will be located together with recep- 
tion rooms and lodgings for returning 
a'-umni. (Date A. D. ?). 

Through the kindness of Prof. Wm. 
E, Martin it is now possessed of a com- 
plete file of the old "College Herald", 
and the "Bucknell Mirror". It has also 
a number of L'Agendas, but lacks the 
issues of the classes of 1914, 1916, 1918. 
Any alumnus having duplicates of 
these issues may earn our eternal grati- 
tude by contributing one. 

Through the thoughtfulness and gen- 
erosity of Prof. N. F. Davis the office 
is furnished with pictures of many of 
the victorious athletic teams of former 
years- As we write, we glance up oc- 
casionally at the football team of '91, 
which beat Cornell 4-0, Lafayette 16-10, 
and State 12-10. 

Several of the alumni were so thought- 
ful as to enclose cards, pictures, or other 
material of great interest and value 
with their questionnaire. We wish to 
thank them and to suggest that others 
imitate them. 

Clippings, pictures, books published 
by Bucknellians, in fact anything con- 
nected with the old college or its his- 
tory, will be gladly received. 



BUCKNELL OF TODAY 



OPEN FORUM 



The Editor has chosen the following 
two from a number of communications 
to this department for publication this 
month, because they strike a note that 
seems at present a favorite with widely 
separated groups of alumni. Does the 
Alumni Association need reorganiza- 
tion? If it does, of what nature and to 
what purpose shall it be? WHAT DO 
YOU THINK? 

Editor Alumni Monthly: 

In the November issue of the Month- 
ly you sa5' the greatest of rights, etc., 
of an alumnus is membership in the 
Alumni Association. Allow me a frank 
question. 

Is or is not the Alumni Association a 
sort of unnecessary nuisance? Is it a 
sort of closed corporation which has an 
annual business meeting, (lasting a 
whole hour! ) resulting in some tom- 
mj'rotical talk and foolish action by a 
handful in the name of BuckneU's 1800 
alumni? Is it or is it not usually domi- 
nated by a few axe-grinders? 

I once belonged, but receiving the 
impression that it is all this, I quit. 
If you can convince me that it serves 
any good end, either to the alumni or 
the college, I shall be glad to send 
check for an annual subscription. 

A Seeker after Truth. 



Dear Rocky: 

* '^ * Don't you think, though, 
that before the Alumni Association can 
do much, it needs a reorganization? 
Something that will give everyone a 
chance? * * *. 

F. 
® 

BIRTHS 



With this issue, the MONTHLY 
begins a series of articles on the pres- 
ent state of the college, above all the 
type and extent of instruction in the 
various departments. 

The work of the Biology Department, 
as presented in the following sketches, 
may well be supplemented by brief edi- 
torial comment on a few points which 
the modesty of the contributors omit- 
ted. 

First, the personnel. Prof. Nelson F. 
Davis is too well known to all the 
alumni, to need comment at the hands 
of the present writer. Of the later- 
comers. Professor Stewart came to 
Bucknell in 1910. A son of Dean Stew- 
art, of Rochester Seminar^-, he had his 
college work at Rochester, and gradu- 
ate work at Michigan and Harvard, 
with additional work at the Marine 
Biological Laboratory at Woods Hole, 
Mass. During 1918-19 he was under 
leave of absence doing Y. M. C. A. 
work in France. 

Asst. Prof. John W. Rice is a Buck- 
nell graduate of 1914, with graduate 
work at Columbia. At the outbreak 
of the war he was transferred from Col- 
umbia to the Rockefeller Institute, 
where he engaged in special research 
for the government, returning to Buck- 
nell after his discharge. The unusual 
opportunities afforded him in his war 
service, where he worked side by side 
with some of the leading men of the 
country, make him a valuable member 
of the department. 

As to the type of work done at 
Bucknell, it is interesting to know that 
despite the present severe competition 
for entrance to medical schools, the per- 
centage of Bucknell men admitted is 
very gratifying. And repeatedly men 
trying to enter medical colleges with- 
out sufficient preparation have been 
recommended to Bucknell for prelim- 
inary training. 

We suggest to those seriously in- 
terested in the work of this depart- 
ment a careful perusal of the catalog 
announcements to supplement the 
necessarily brief statement of the work 
as given here, and an inspection of the 
equipment of the museum and working 
collections when they revisit their Alma 
Mater. 



THE DRIVE 



Born, October 20, to Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles L. Bromley, at Berwyn, 111., a 
son, Charles, Jr. 



Dr. Judd's frank statement of the 
present financial condition of the L^ni- 
versity, found in another column, wiU 
be welcomed by the alumni as an indi- 
cation of progress, though the rate of 
progress is perhaps slower than vte 
might desire. 

It also indicates clearly the way for 
more rapid progress. "Every dollar 
paid in, brings the new engineering 
building nearer". 

® 

DR. ROWLAND DIES SUDDENLY 

As the Alumni Monthly goes to press 
word of the sudden death of Rev. Dr. 
A. Tudson Rowland, '62. at his home in 
Philadelphia, on Sunday, December 
12th has been received. Although Dr. 
Rowland had not been well for several 
days, his death was entirely unexpected. 
An account of Dr. Rowland's life will be 
printed in an early issue. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



Football Season Ends 



BUCKNELL, 7; LAFAYETTE, 10. 

In a brilliant and hard-fought game 
at Easton on November 6, Bucknell 
lost to Lafayette by a field-goal. La- 
fayette had the edge on the Lewisburg 
eleven, but was forced to extend her- 
self to the utmost to win, and narrow- 
ly escaped a tie score, one of Bowser's 
field-goals missing by inches. 

Bucknell opened strong and carried 
the ball far in her first offensive, but 
not quite far enough to score. Twice in 
the first quarter, Lafayette too work- 
ed the ball to Bucknell's twenty-five- 
yard line, but was unable to carry 
through. Bowser's daring attempt at 
field-goal from the fifty-yard line was 
almost successful. 

In the second quarter again Lafayette 
developed offensive strength sufficient 
to carry the ball to within 20 and 33 
yards of the Orange and Blue goal 
line, but failed on two attempts at 
field-goal, one of which hit the cross bar. 
The third quarter brought all the 
scoring. Gazella broke away in mid- 
field for a fifty-yard run which was 
good for a touchdown, and this was 
shortly followed by a successful at- 
tempt for a field-goal by Brennan. 

Then suddenly Bucknell changed 
tactics, and sprung the most talked of 
play of the season. On a trick place- 
ment kick formation, the ball was pass- 
ed to McDermott on the ground, who 
tossed it to Mangan, who forward pass- 
ed it to Julian. The speedy end crossed 
the line for a touchdown, and Bowser 
kicked the goal. 

This ended the scoring. The lineup: 
Lafayette Bucknell 

Patterson Julian 

. Left End 

Bedner Homan 

Left Tackle 

Budd Morrett 

Left Guard 

Brown Bihl 

Center 

Schwab Reed 

Right Guard 

Deibel Dooley 

Right Tackle 

O'Connell McDermott 

Right End 

Brennan Mangan 

Quarterback 

Lehacka Wilsbach 

Left Halfback 

Gazella Kostos 

Right Halfback 

Seasholtz Bowser 

Fullback 
Score by periods: 

Lafayette 10 0—10 

Bucknell 7—7 

Touchdowns — Gazella, Julian. Goals 
from touchdowns — Brennan, Bowser, 
Placement goal — Brennan. Substitutions 
—Lafayette: Bartlett for Lehecka, Wol- 
bert for Budd, Smith for Brennan. 
Referee — R. Merritt, Yale.' Umpire — 
"Speedy" Rush, Princeton. Head lines- 
man— T. Lynn, Yale. Time of periods 
^15 minutes. 



BUCKNELL, 45; GETTYSBURG, 0. 

In a game sensational with unex- 
pected breaks and brilliant individual 
feats, Bucknell rolled up a big score 
against her battle-field rival in the an- 
nual contest at Harrisburg. 

The breaks of the game were with 
Bucknell, but it took football brains to 
take advantage of them, so that while 
the difference between the teams was 
not so great as the score would indi- 
cate, Bucknell earned her total by play- 
ing the ball hard and all the time. 

The Lewisburg eleven, as in several 
of the later games, got away to a bad 
-start, and in the first quarter was actu- 
ally outplayed by the rival Orange and 
Blue team. The baU was in Bucknell 
territory most of the time, and Gettys- 
burg had two excellent chances for 
fie'd goals, but both trials failed. 

In the second quarter the big Blue 
team got going. The first score was 
Bowser's field goal from placement on 
the 42-yard line, Julian holding the ball. 
Shortly after the second kickoff. Bowser 
broke away on an off-tackle play, and 
ran 44 yards to a touchdown. The 
first half ended with the score 10-0. 

In the third quarter Bowser, whose 
punts had been going badly, began to 
answer Gettysburg's punting game with 
placement kicks, several of which went 
75 yards. Gettysburg began to tire and 
fumble. Two fumbles in Gettysburg 
territory were picked up by Julian and 
Homan, who converted them into touch- 
downs. Gdaniec went in for Kostos, and 
contributed another. Bowser added two 
more to his strin<?, and in spite of des- 
perate playing on the part of the Get- 
tysburg team, the final score was rolled 
up. Gettysburg displayed a flash of 
offensive strength almost at the end, 
but was unable to score. 

The lineup: 
Gettysburg Bucknell 

Keiser Julian 

Left End 

Larew Homan 

Left Tackle 

Gingrich Reed 

Left Guard 

Richards Bihl 

Center 

Derr Morrett 

. Right Guard 

Dulebohn Dooley 

Right Tackle 

Emanuel Wargo 

Right End 

Smith Mangan 

Quarterback 

McDowell Wilsbach 

Left Halfback 

Phillips Kostos 

Right Halfback 

Fuhrman Bowser 

Fullback 
Touchdowns — Bowser, 3; Homan, 
Julian, Gdaniec. Goal from placement 
— Bowser. Goals from touchdown — 
Kostos 4, Dayhoff 2. Substitutes- 
Stewart for Keiser, Kyle for Stewart, 
(Continued on Page Eight) 



BUCKNELL, 20; DICKINSON, 6. 

On a muddy field, under a sullen sky 
that frightened away all spectators 
save confirmed football fans, Bucknell 
defeated Dickinson at Williamsport or. 
Thanksgiving Day. 

As in the Gettysburg game, the 
Orange and Blue eleven seemed unable 
to find itself in the first quarter, and it 
needed the sting of a fairly earned 
touchdown by its lighter opponents in 
the first quarter to get the big team 
going. Even then it seemed sluggish 
and unwieldy, and this fact, due some- 
what to the condition of the field, with 
the infliction of frequent penalties, kept 
down the scoring. Without detracting 
in any way from the hard fighting of 
the light Dickinson eleven, it is fair to 
say that the Orange and Blue failed to 
display the qualities which have made 
the season a success. ' 

Dickinson started the fight by kick- 
ing off, and then blocking a punt. Buck- 
nell recovered the ball, but was unable 
to gain, and punted again. Dickinson 
mached up the field by consistent gains. 
Brophy scored, but the try at goal 
failed. Bucknell then carried the ball 
down the field, but Dickinson held on 
her two-yard line as the period ended. 

In the second period a short punt 
gave Bucknell the ball again at Dickin- 
son's 20-yard line,, but Dickinson held 
on her one-yard line for three downs. 
Bowser going across on the last at- 
tempt. Kostos kicked the goal. 

Dickinson kicked off and held, forc- 
ing Bucknell to kick. Bowser kicked 
60 yards, but Bucknell was penalized 
half the distance to the goal line. Soon 
after the Orange and Blue gained the 
ball on Dickinson's 30-yard line, and a 
five-yard gain by Kostos, and a 25-yard 
gain by Bowser scored the second 
touchdown. Kostos again kicked the 
goal. 

In the third period Bowser's long 
kick sent the ball close to the Dickin- 
son line. Bowser carried it across, but 
a penalty nullified the touchdown. A 
moment later a forward pass, Dayhoff 
to Julian, gave the third touchdown. 
Kostos failed to kick the goal. 

The fourth period saw a see-saw 
game, neither team being able to score, 
though Dickinson was once on Buck- 
nell's IS-yard line, and was threatening 
on several occasions. 

Bucknell scored eleven first downs, 
Dickinson five. Bucknell was pen- 
alized 80 yards, Dickinson 20. 

The lineup: 
Bucknell Dickinson 

Julian Babcock 

Left End 

Homan Blumenthall 

Left Tackle 

Reed Cook 

Left Guard 

Bihl J. Smith 

Center 

Morrett Dougherty 

Right Guard 
(Continued on Page Eight) 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



Alumni Organizations 



»•»•..•..•..#•••••( 



ENTHUSIASTIC GATHERING 
OF NEW YORK ALUMNI 



Ninety-two Bucknell alumni, alum- 
nae, and friends, gave an enthusiastic 
ovation to President Hunt and Dr. 
David Jayne Hill, '74, at a dinner at the 
Marlborough Hotel, New York City, 
Thursday evening, November 4th. A 
spirit of optimism, faith, good fellow- 
ship and good humor dominated the 
gathering. Concrete proposals and 
constructive suggestions for the en- 
largement of the service which Buck- 
nell is rendering were made, and past 
and present achievements .described. 
The features which excited most in- 
terest and the memory of old times 
and scenes at the college were the 
reminiscences of Dr. Hill, and the stere- 
opticon views of the college presented 
by Dr. Hunt, A telegram of sympathy 
was sent Christy Matthewson who is 
ill at Saranac Lake, N. Y. Rush Kress, 
a graduate in 1900, and trustee, presided 
and introduced the speakers. 

Dr. Hill was the first speaker. He ex- 
pressed his surprise and pleasure at the 
number present, and at the strength of 
the alumni organization in New York 
and vicinity. The whole college in his 
day, he said, had no more students than 
were present at the dinner. He paid 
tribute to the distinguished scholarship 
of the six or eight professors who com- 
prised the whole faculty fifty years ago, 
and made a plea for the preservation 
of the intimate relations between stu- 
dent and faculty which are possible only 
in the small college. Dr. Bliss was feel- 
ingly referred to and mention made of 
Dr. Bliss's son. General Tasker Bliss, 
who, he said, "represented us at the 
Peace Conference as well as any one". 
In his day, the speaker explained, the 
students got up at six in the morning, 
hurried down town for breakfast, often 
wading through deep snow on the hill, 
and were back at the college for chapel 
at 6.45. Football and other sports then 
were innocuous in comparison with the 
war-like and bloody clashes of today. 

After the applause that followed Dr. 
Hill's graceful and interesting address 
had subsided, Professor Lindemann, '98, 
arose to give one of the dry, rambling 
talks for which he is well-known. After 
a humorous recital of some New York 
incidents which involved Louis Lyne as 
well as himself, he spoke briefly on the 
dividends that had come to the alumni 
of Bucknell from their contributions to 
the college, whether those gifts were of 
money, faith or prayers. Bucknell is 
training the leaders of tomorrow; it has 
trained many who are leaders today. "I 
am not teaching strength of materials", 
said Professor Lindemann, "I am teach- 
ing students". 

W. W. Kelchner, '86, the next speaker, 
in a happy and appropriate address ex- 
pressed the appreciation of the New 
York alumni for the energy, patience 
and tact of the committee on arrange- 
ments which had planned the dinner. 
(This brought blushes to the faces of 



the committee, particularly C. M. 
Konkle, '01, and Louis Lyne, 'ID. Mr. 
Kelchner also paid tribute to Dr. Hill's 
regime while president at Lewisburg. 

Mrs. J. R .Wood, '94, who was called 
to speak next, claimed that she was 
born and bred a Bucknellian. Six out 
of a possible seven in her family at- 
tended the college on the hill. She as- 
serted that the women graduates of 
Bucknell had always made good 
whether as teachers, as wives, as nurses 
in the Civil War and ever since, or as 
social workers. "They will make good 
in political affairs also", Mrs. Wood 
prophesied, closing her stimulating ad- 
dress by an effective quotation from 
Kipling. 

Frank W. Jackson, '95, expressed sur- 
prise when called to his feet, venturing 
that possibly "Whom the Gods would 
destroy, they first honor". He advo- 
cated a football game with Yale at 
Lewisburg, or if this were not possible, 
at New Haven. Direct train service be- 
tween New York and Lewisburg would 
help alumni to keep in touch with the 
college. If this were not possible loyal 
alumni would be obliged to move to 
Philadelphia in order to be within easy 
reach of Lewisburg. Mr. Jackson wants 
Bucknell to become better known. An 
effective way for the college to secure 
better loyalty from the alumni would be 
to treat each graduate as if he or she 
were great and distinguished. 

Rush Kress next voiced, in a brief 
and earnest way, the growing admira- 
tion and affection which the alumni 
have for Dr. Hunt. In two years, he 
said, the Bucknell football team would 
be playing the best teams of the east. 
He appealed for interest and moral sup- 
port from all alumni, and explained how 
social conditions at the college were 
much improved. The students were 
learning self-reliance and justice. The 
personal touch between faculty and stu- 
dent was pervading the whole institu- 
tion. 

Dr. Hunt's response to Mr. Kress's 
introduction and his subsequent re- 
marks served to explain the hold which 
he is obtaining upon an ever increasing 
number of the students and alumni. 
He said that the biggest thing in life to 
him was the personal relationship, and 
that the biggest thing in college was the 
personal relationship with the students. 
His ideal is to have an increased pro- 
portion in the number of instructors to 
the number of students, and more "fine 
leisure" for scholarship. Intensive de- 
velopment at Bucknell is of more con- 
cern to him than extensive, although a 
certain amount of extensive develop- 
ment in the form of additional facilities 
and buildings has been forced upon the 
college. A comparison of the curriculum 
of Bucknell with that of other insti- 
tutions, Dr. Hunt stated, would demon- 
strate that our curriculum had been 
brought down at least fairly to date. 
Before showing the lantern slides of the 
college, he closed his address with the 
words, "I covet the understanding and 
sympathy from you which will make 



of Bucknell a real college that will 
make real men and women". 

It was announced that another dinner 
and meeting of the Bucknell alumni 
would be held next May. The follow- 
ing is a list of those present: 

Emory W. Hunt, '84; C. A. Linde- 
mann, '98; Clara M. Goodchild, '84; 
Frank M, Goodchild, '84; Creighton M. 
Konkle, '01; Laura L. Konkle, '01; J. R. 
Wood, '94; Eliza Bell Wood, '94; Jesse 
O. Shipman, '89; Florence E, Shipman; 
Kathryn Ryan Lose, '11; Chas. Lose, 
Jr., '11; L. J. Bartlett, '16; Katharine N. 
Bartlett; Florence V. Stauffer, '10; J. 
Leslie Crowell, '11; Arial Kromer, '17; 
Geo. F. Ballets, '09; John Stahl, '04; H. 
P. Beaver, '85; Wm, N. C. Marsh, '03; 
Omar H. Smith, '15; Homer D. Kresge, 
'10; Alexis W. Keen, '13; Daniel H. 
Nester, '11; Stanley P. Davies, '12; 
Ramona F. Davies, '15; Endera I. 
Davies, '03; E. A. Bush, '94; Mary A. 
Bush, Sem,, '92; Frank W. Jackson, '95; 
Wm. W. Kelchner, '86; Helen O. Kelch- 
ner; Mary Ecclesten, '97; Gertrude W. 
Roos, '00; "Tiny" Hottenstein, '01; Mil- 
dred B. Gathers, '10; A. J. Huston, '11; 
C. Maude Hummel, '05; Elsie Kapp; 
L, O, Manley, '07; Mrs, L. O. Manley; 
Charles Francis Potter, '07; Sarah 
Wood; W. D. Hinman, '07; Earl P. 
Raub, '18; James R. Waldron, '20; Dor- 
othy McClintic Hillsley, '18; Frank J. 
Sevan, '01; R. L. Rooke, '13; J. R. 
Irwin, '14; Rolls J. Crane, '14; L. R. 
Rentz, '99; Walter L. Noll, '08; P. J. 
Sanders, '11; H. J. Sheppard, '06; A. 
Steinhilper, '05; C. A. Soars, '17; N. J. 
Rehman, '16; Mary Pauline Schenk, '20; 
Jeannette C. Nutty, Harriet Dillon, 
Jonas Tuman, '11; N. R. Quintin, '10; 
Ida J. Bank; J. C. Bank, '10; E. M. 
App, '11; Mary B. Harris, '94; Edith 
Fetherston, '05; Katharine S. Pang- 
burn; W. W. Pangburn, '10; Marian 
Harman Hawkins, '14; O. V. W. Haw- 
kins, '13; Margaret C. Weddell, '16; 
Laurens W. Weddell, '15; Louise Bassell 
Belcher, '17; E. J, Belcher, '17 in law; 
Rachel Eddelman McGee, '04; Harland 
A. Trax, '01; Mrs. P. B. Cregar; P. B. 
Cregar, '95; Mrs. Aida Myers Houston, 
'00; David Jayne Hill, '74; R. H. Cress, 
'00; Louis Lyne, '11. 



-®- 



Alumni at Harrisburg 

Among the alumni who held informal 
reunions at the Penn-Harris and Island 
Park on the day of the Gettysburg 
game were: Charles H. Baldwin, '08 
Wm. Baldwin, '09; A. O, Vorse, '05 
George Cockill, '05; J, K. Bowman, '11 
R. W. Thompson, '04; H. T. Meyer, '06, 
W. H. Donehower, '06; T. J. S. Heim, 
'20; J. H. Hendren, ex-'20; P. B. Shel- 
ley, '06; G. H. Neff, '16; Evan Ingram, 
'20; James McClure, ex-'13; Hon. Albert 
W. Johnson, '96, and Mrs. Johnson; D. 
Walter Moore, '09; L. L. Rockwell, '07; 
J. A. Tyson, '12; "Billy" Shipp, ex-'OO; 
Elizabeth Spyker, '19; Stewart Dun- 
can, '08; Wilmon Keiser, '15; W, R, 
Heckendom, '20; E. R. Hassrick, '18, 
and S. L. Seaman, '17. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



In the Public Eye 



'••^•^•^•^-••^••••••-••*«**«**«»*«4>*T» 



Well-Known Alumnus Takes 
Business Trip Around World 



Dr. Hill in Next Cabinet ? 



Andrew A, Leiser, Jr., Bucknell, '98, 
Yale, '99, is in Paris on the last lap of a 
busy, but interesting trip, around the 
world. Mr. Leiser, who is at the head 
of the Legal Department of the Fisk 
Rubber Company, with his offices at 
Chicopee Falls, Mass., left San Fran- 
cisco, July 2, 1920, on his way to Singa- 
pore, Straits Settlements, on business 
for his company. He spent about seven 
weeks there on legal work and investi- 
gating the rubber industry, making 
business calls in Sumatra, Java and 
Malay Peninsula, where is to be found 
the oldest plantation rubber country in 
the world. 

On his way home, the Company re- 
quired stops on business in Ceylon, 
Egypt, France, Belgium and London. 
The rubber plantations in Ceylon were 
visited and the cotton raising industry 
and markets were studied in Egypt. Mr. 
Leiser had previously investigated the 
possibilities of cotton raising in Cali- 
fornia and Mexico. Mr. Leiser expects 
to complete the trip in about six 
months. 

In Yokohama, Leiser met Coulter, 
B. U., 1914, who is teaching in a Japa- 
nese University, and in Manila found the 
Great Northern with the American 
Congressional Party aboard, including 
Milton W. Shreve, B. U., '84, a Penn- 
sylvania congressman. Enroute to 
Honolulu, Leiser met a young Japanese 
who had played baseball with Bridge- 
port in the Eastern League, and had 
p'ayed against Bucknell as a member 
of the team representing the Chinese 
College at Honolulu. The Jap said, 
"We could never beat Bucknell". 

Drew says he is now, well qualified, by 
first hand experience, to deliver a lec- 
ture on "Bugology in the Far East" 
® • 



Tyson and Wendt Make Good 

J. A. Tyson, '11, and Paul R. Wendt, 
'13, both feature in the November issue 
of "The Equiowa", the official organ of 
The Equitable Life Insurance of Iowa. 

Mr. Tyson led all the agents of the 
country during October in his sales of 
insurance to old policyholders, his re- 
turn calls aggregating $60,250. 

Mr. Wendt has in this issue a long, 
well-written article on "The Value of 
Our Agency Clubs", illustrated with 
graphs and a cut of the author. 
® 

Prof. Owens Speaks at Waseda 



Yoshikazu Kanamori, a Japanese stu- 
dent at Bucknell, pointed recently to a 
dizzying conglomerate of hieroglyphics 
in a paper that he had received from 
home, and explained that in plain 
American, the hieroglyphics signified 
that Prof. Wm. G. Owens had delivered 
an address at Waseda University, of 
which Mr. Kanamori is a graduate. 



Dr. David Jayne Hill, '74, is consider- 
ed to be one of the strongest candidates 
for the position of Secretary of State 
in President-elect Harding's cabinet. 
His equipment for the office and the 
possibility of his acceptance are thus 
stated by the Philadelphia Public 
Ledger: 

"As indicated in a dispatch to the 
Public Ledger on October 12, Dr. Hill 
is being supported by men whose ad- 
vice is known to carry great weight 
with Mr. Harding. He is held to have 
the full indorsement of Colonel George 
Harvey and others of like prominence 
and influence. The supporters of Dr. 
Hill point to his broad practical knowl- 
edge of international statecraft, espe- 
cially as revealed in his book on the 
subject of European diplomacy. He 
has given years of his life to the study 
of questions that now press to the front, 
and, his friends assert, he would carry 
to the cabinet post such a person bear- 
ing of dignity and reserve as to restore 
the position to its traditional status. It is 
not known here whether Dr. Hill would 
accept the post, but it is felt he would, 
because of a sense of duty to give his 
country the benefit of his exceptional 
knowledge and experience". 

® 

Perez Has Big Job 



Gilbert S. Perez, '07, who has spent 
the greater part of the time since his 
graduation in educational work in 
the Philippines, is at present Division 
Superintendent of Schools of the Di- 
vision of Tayabas, Lucerra, a district of 
about the size of the State of Con- 
necticut. !1 ! 

In this position he has charge of a 
school system with 23,000 pupils. How 
the district is advancing under the 
supervision of Superintendent Perez, is 
shown by these comparative statistics. 
The number of teachers in the district 
was in 1918, 438, in 1919, 684, in 1920, 
880. In 1916 it ranked eighth in attend- 
ance, in 1919, second; Manila being the 
only division to surpass it. 

Of the high school graduates of last 
year, five are now studying in this 
country. Superintendent Perez is hope- 
ful in the future to steer some towards 
Bucknell. 

In December, Mr. Perez starts for 
"the States", on a vacation, and hopes 
to visit his Alma Mater before return- 
ing to the Islands. 

® 

Mingos a Major 

Dr. Jay H. Mingos, ex-'ll, who after 
leaving Bucknell, was graduated from 
Jefferson Medical College, has recently 
been promoted to the rank of major 
in the United States Army. 

He enlisted three years ago as a lieu- 
tenant, saw service in France, and is at 
present stationed at Fort Houston, 
Texas. 



Bostwick, '05, Appointed 

on Important Commission 

The Court of Quarter Sessions, of Al- 
legheny County, upon petition of voters, 
presented to the Court by Howard W. 
Douglass, Republican County . Chair- 
nian, has appointed a Commission of 
nine niembers, three lawyers and six 
laymen, to redistrict the county into 
voting districts to suit the convenience 
of the voters and for the benefit of the 
voting' public generally. 

Though there are now almost eight 
hundred fifty voting districts in this 
"State of Allegheny", many of them had 
so many voters assessed, registered and 
enrolled, and so many votes cast, that 
the election boards were over-burdened 
and kept at work all night counting 
votes and making up returns. This 
condition was largely responsible for in- 
ability to get men to serve on election 
boards. After the franchise was extend- 
ed to women, and many women were 
assessed, the districts became still more 
crowded. By the next primary election, 
it is estimated as many women as men 
will be on the voting lists. It was, 
therefore, evident that further sub- 
division of voting districts is imperative- 
ly necessary. This led to the presenta- 
tion of the petition and the appoint- 
ment of the commission. 

The Court appointed on this im- 
portant commission Roy G. Bostwick, 
who is the Solicitor for the Borough of 
Wilkinsburg, and has had much ex- 
perience in this matter of redistricting, 
having served on a number of commis- 
sions to redistrict several municipal 
sub-divisions of the County. His ap- 
pointment to this important countv 
position indicates the satisfaction of 
the Court with the work he has already 
done. The other men appointed are 
also of a type calculated to make a 
satisfactory body for this important 
work. 

The task is a heavy one, which will 
take months to complete. By the 
Court's order the Commission organiz- 
ed on the Monday following the No- 
vember election. 

® 

Wyant and Woodruff Win 



Since the November issue went to 
press we have been informed of the 
election of two other Pennsylvania 
alumni to state and national offices. 

Adam M. Wyant, ex-'94, of Greens- 
burg, made a successful campaign for 
Congress from the Westmoreland' dis- 
trict. 

Prof. J. I. Woodruff, '90, of Selinsgrove, 
was elected to the State Assembly, 
from Snyder County. Prof. Woodruff 
will be remembered as the sponsor of 
the well-known "Woodruff Teachers' 
Salary Bill". 

© 

Lt. Hugh Max Bullard will be, dur- 
ing the winter, in Washington, where he 
resides at Apt. 214, 1401 Columbia 
Road. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



4S»"*"*"«»****««>*«>*«-*»*»«»*»*»«»*»*»«»«"*»«»( 



Bucknell of Today 



-••••••••••"•-I 



•••••••••**«»*»«««**«»*»«»i 




Prof. Davis 



THE BIOLOGICAL DEPART- 
MENT 

General Scope 

The Biological De- 
partment at Bucknell 
has undergone a 
steady growth since 
its organization. 
Three professors are 
now giving their en- 
tire time to this 
work. Professor Davis 
teaches the Geology 
and Botany, Profes- 
sor Stewart the Zool- 
ogy and Microscopic 
Anatomy, and Profes- 
sor Rice the Physiology and Bacteriol- 
ogy. All courses extend throughout the 
year. The catalogue will show how 
these subjects are sub-divided. 

About ninety students are now tak- 
ing the Biological course, and these, 
with those from other courses who elect 
biological subjects, crowd our classes. 

The study of living organisms is one 
of the most fascinating of all natural 
phenomena. To understand the biol- 
ogist's view-point concerning life and 
what definite facts he knows, and how 
he attempts to explain these facts, we 
must become familiar with some of the 
generalizations of Biology. It is the 
purpose to interpret the more import- 
ant of these fundamental truths and the 
constant aim is to teach how to inter- 
pret nature. 




Zoology 

The returning alum- 
nus who visits the old 
Academy Building 
finds so many changes 
that only the build- 
ing itself is as of old. 
The third floor is de- 
voted to biology 
courses. To meet the 
need of light for mi- 
croscopic work, draw- 
ing and fine dissec- 
Prof. Stewart tion, glass sky-lights 
have been put in the 
roof and ceilings. What was in the 
earlier days twelve separate dormitory 
rooms was in 1915 changed to three lab- _ 
oratories, a store room and an office. 
The largest room is devoted to the work 
in zoology, and measures 48x36 feet, 
having 11 windows overlooking the 
open country to the west. In 1910 
eighteen students were enrolled in this 
course. Though the domestic science 
students have been separated from it, 
there are at present seventy in the class. 

Thirty compound microscopes are 
used in zoology, giving approximately 
three to each four members of a labor- 
atory section. A projection apparatus 
is employed to reveal upon a screen the 
structure of living and preserved micro- 
scopic organisms. By this instrument. 



also, drawings are secured to great ad- 
vantage, of objects actually half an 
inch or less in size, but appearing on 
the drawing sheet as five to eight inches. 
The behavior of micro-organisms in cul- 
tures is rendered visible, (protozoa, en- 
tomostraca, etc.,) the field suggesting a 
view of New York streets from the top 
of the Woolworth Building. 

The identity of certain rare pro- 
tozoa occurring in Union County has 
been finally made certain by the ac- 
quisition of new books. Eight hundred 
dollars would be required to replace the 
museum collection of dissections that 
have been made by teachers and stu- 
dents to illustrate comparative an- 
atomy. There is also a collection of 
about one hundred and fifty charts for 
which only the nominal cost of ma- 
terials has been required. The collec- 
tions of insects, skeletons, moUusk 
shells, fossils, birds, and preserved ani- 
mals in formalin are constantly grow- 
ing. 

In the course in microscopic anatomy 
each student prepares his own collec- 
tion of slides. One hundred and fifty 
dozens of eggs have been used so far 
this fall in connection with the em- 
bryology of the bird, and it is probable 
that twenty-eight thousand serial sec- 
tions will be mounted before Christ- 
mas. Lack of space embarrasses the 
work in this class, but relief is in sight. 

The university's collection of micro- 
scopic slides for reference and teaching 
in the comparative and human hist- 
ology, numbers three thousand. Sev- 
eral collections have been received by 
gift just recently, as that of two hun- 
dred and fifty slides on pathology pre- 
sented by S. Dale Spotts, and that on 
histology and entomology by the late 
J. Warren Noll. The actual value of 
the present collection can be appreciat- 
ed only by those who have experienced 
the difficulties of making such a col- 
lection. 

An earnest endeavor is made to make 
the work in zoology and minute an- 
atomy of the greatest practical value 
to the student in his interpretation as 
well as his acquaintance with the facts 
considered. To bridge the gap between 
co'lege and medical school we are also 
constantly asking and receiving valued 
suggestions from our former students 
now in the medical schools, as well as 
the deans and professors of the medi- 
cal schools. 

While twenty-one of our men are now 
enrolled at Jefferson Medical School, 
five at the University of Pennsylvania, 
and two at Johns Hopkins, it is to the 
men who prove their worth in graduate 
courses and under new conditions that 
we look for credit to be reflected on 
Bucknell. 

Geology and Botany 

Both of these courses have been ex- 
panded within the last few years, and 
are still in process of expansion. The 
Groff estate has very fittingly been set 
aside for future development as a bo- 




Prof. Rice 



tanical garden, and as soon as condi- 
tions will allow, a green-house wiU be 
erected to support the work in botany, 
which is at present intensively studied 
in the laboratory and the open. 

The geological courses are aided by a 
col'ection of minerals which the Curator 
of Mineralogy of the Philadelphia Aca- 
demy of Sciencjs has pronounced the 
best college collection in Pennsylvania. 

Physiology and Bacteriology 

During the year 
1917 the first regular 
laboratory course in 
Physiology was insti- 
tuted. The aim of the 
course was to sup- 
plement the text and 
lectures with physio- 
logical phenomena 
which could be dem- 
onstrated in the lab- 
oratory. The class 
that year numbered 
about 45. The lab- 
oratory facilities were meager, and the 
equipment was crude, nevertheless the 
results obtained in the class warranted 
an expansion of the idea of laboratory 
training in Physiology. Each succeed- 
ing year witnessed a polishing and 
rounding out of laboratory direction, 
and the installation of new and up-to- 
date equipment, so that at the present 
time double the number of students are 
being instructed in the course with the 
same size of teaching staf?, and with 
very little increase in class room and 
laboratory space. Moreover, to fill the 
needs of those students who are looking 
forward to a medical training, or to a 
specialized teaching career in the second- 
dary schools, the course in Physiology 
was expanded to cover a full academic 
year with the addition to the courses 
of more involved experiments in physio- 
logical chemistry, and more complex ex- 
periments on the physiology of the 
muscular, the nervous, digestive, respira- 
tory, and circulatory systems. The lab- 
oratory equipment for these courses is 
modern in every respect, and is being 
added to from time to time as the in- 
crease in the Classes warrants. 

Bucknell long ago enjoyed the dis- 
tinction of being the first of the smaller 
colleges to offer a course of instruction 
in Bacteriology. Throughout more than 
a score of years a sound course in the 
fundamentals of Bacteriology was pre- 
sented one term of each academic year. 
Admirab'e results were obtained in the 
laboratory in spite of the fact that the 
apparatus and equipment was of the 
simplest sort and possessed strong indi- 
cations of being home-made in a great 
many cases. Within the past year the 
Board of Trustees of the coMege granted 
an appropriation to the Biology De-. 
partment large enough to fit up and 
equip a modern Bacteriology labor- 
a story All of the types of approved 
and up-to-date apparatus found in the 
better equipped bacteriological labor- 

(Continued on Page Twelve) 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



About the Hill 



A.a.^»«..a«i 



FOOTBALL SEASON 



With the victory over Dickinson, on 
Thanksgiving Day, the Orange and 
Blue 'eleven completed a season which, 
though it did not .live up to all the 
hopes that were entertained for it, can 
nevertheless be pronounced successful. 

The team scared 245 points to 37 
scored by its opponents, and won six 
games of the nine played. The defeats 
at Philadelphia, Annapolis, and Easton, 
were by narrow margins, and with the 
exception of the Penn game, by supe- 
rior teams. 

The team and the rooters join in at- 
tributing a large degree of the success 
to Coach C. W. P. Reynolds. "Pete" has 
justified his reputation by establishing 
a system which, if continued, will as- 
suredly bear fruit in a series of suc- 
cessful years on the gridiron. A gen- 
tlemanly bearing on and off the field, per- 
fect justice in awarding praise and 
blame, and a driving ability the equal 
of which has scarcely been seen on 
Tustin Field, are his outstanding 
characteristics. "He handles his men 
as a good officer would", was one com- 
ment on his method, and repeatedly 
words of praise were uttered on his 
surprising way of driving a team with- 
out loudness or profanity, and his skill 
in keeping a whole squad at work. 
There was little "loafing" about the 
field during the last two seasons. 

To be sure, he had excellent material. 
Nevertheless, full use of the man-power 
at his disposal was made and none of it 
wasted, as has been the case at times 
in the past. With several good men to 
pick from for almost every position, 
Reynolds 'developed the good qualities 
of each candidate, and while he con- 
centrated on the success of the present, 
laid at the same time firm foundations 
for next season. He took especial care 
of the physical condition of his men, 
with the result that in all the late-sea- 
son games, the Bucknell team, in 
physical condition, was superior to 
its opponents He developed also the 
quality of following the ball all the 
time, so that Bucknell, with scarcely a 
fumble of her own in the later games, 
a'most invariably recovered the ball on 
opponent errors of this nature. The 
close following of the ball added to the 
score on several occasions, notably in 
the Gettysburg game. 

The prospects for next year are very 
good. Of the Varsity lineup. Captain 
"Toe" Kostos, "Tommy" Mangan, 
"Mac" McDerraott, and "Steve" Wargo, 
will be lost by graduation. Kostos has 
been a heady halfback, never sensa- 
tional, but dependable. His coolness 
made him an excellent captain. Man- 
gan ran the team well from the quarter- 
back position. His work this year has 
been erratic, at times very good, at 
times poor. McDermott was an ag- 
gressive end, who put spirit into the 
team, as well as playing his position 
well. On occasion his work was mag- 
nificent. Wargo, though handicapped 
by injuries at times, has been a steady 



end, always in the game. Thanks to 
the large amount of backfield and end 
material, remaining in college, the loss 
of these men will not be felt so much as 
it would be in leaner years. 

Great credit is due Mr. Glass for his 
skiful conduct of the season. Working 
under considerable handicaps he labor- 
ed day and night to make the year 
a success, and at the same time to lay 
the foundation of an athletic system 
which will be permanent. 

® 

The Basketball Schedule 



HILL AND BURG 



The schedule follows: 
Jan. 7 — Dickinson, here. 
Jan. 8 — Susquehanna, at Selinsgrove. 
Jan. 13 — Frankhn and Marshall, at 

Lancaster. 
Jan. 14 — Temple, at Philadelphia. 
Jan. 15 — Swarthmore, at Swarthmore. 
Jan. 22 — Gettysburg, here. 
Jan. 28— Albright, here. 
Feb. 5 — Franklin and Marshall, here. 
Feb. 10 — Susquehaniia, here. 
Feb. 11 — Dickinson, at Carlisle. 
Feb. 12 — Gettysburg, at Gettysburg. 
Feb. 19 — Temple, here, 
Feb. 24 — Juniata, here. 
Feb. 25— Open. 
Feb. 2&— Open. 

Mar. 1 — Juniata, at Huntington. 
Mar. 2 — Pittsburgh, at Pittsburgh. 
Mar. 3 — Carnegie Tech, at Pittsburgh. 
Mar. 4 — Duquesne U., at Pittsburgh. 
Mar. 11 — Alumni, here. 

® 

Basketball Prospects 

At the first basketball practice in 
Tustin Gymnasium, nine full teams, 
over forty-five men, turned out. This 
is perhaps the largest basketball squad 
ever seen at Bucknell. 

The squad is hard at work under 
Captain Dorris. Of last year's varsity, 
besides Dorris at center, are the guards. 
Bihl and Dietrich. The positions left 
vacant at forward by the graduation of 
Waddell and Mathieson will have to 
be filled. Searles, Woodring, Julian, 
Treadwell, and Dayhoff, of last year's 
scrubs, have, so far, shown ud well. A 
large amount of good material is pres- 
ent in the freshman class of whom are 
Wilsbach, of Harrisburg Tech; Defi- 
baugh, of Pittsburgh, and the Coe 
brothers, of the State of Washington. 

Along the line of Gym improvements 
are new baskets and banking boards, 
and new score boards. The coaching of 
the team is in the hands of Graduate 
Manager Leo Glass. On the managing 
end are F. F. Reamer, Manager; Sis- 
serson, Lappe, and Mathieson, First As- 
sistants, and Rentz, Mahoney, Strmster. 
Garrett, and Chapman, Second Assist- 
ants. 

O 

The residence being constructed by 
Professor F. E. Burpee on Second street, 
opposite the Court House, is nearing 
completion, while ground was broken 
recently for Dean Phillips' new home on 
Walker street. 



Professor and Mrs. Wm. G. Owens . 
returned from their Oriental tour in 
time to spend Thanksgiving evening at 
home with their daughters. 
» * * 

The Glee Club made its first long 
trip of the season November 23-Dec. 3, 
appearing in Harrisburg, Hollidaysburg, 
Cresson, Jeannette, Vandergrift, Con- 
nellsville, Pittsburgh, Linesville, Green- 
ville, and Kittanning. It received an 
unusual hearty reception from alumni 
all along the line. 

* * •» 

The various departmental clubs are 
in full swing. The Medical Club, whose 
president is Harry Thomas, of Wheel- 
ing, W. Va., was addressed by Dr. C. 
A. Gundy on November 8. On Novem- 
ber 22 a demonstration of dislocation 
of joints was given by Dr. Hilliard. The 
c'ub was entertained by Prof. Stewart 
on November 4. 

The Mathematics Club is holding 
bi-weekly meetings. Miss Elizabeth 
Weidner, of Vineland, N. J., was recent- 
ly elected its president. It has been 
addressed bv Professor Lindemann and 
Mr. Gold. 

The Mechanical Engineers' Society, 
Bucknell branch, has elected Eugene 
Kallay, of Leechburg, its president, and 

plans an active year. 

* * * 

Armistice Day was celebrated with a 
parade and a pub'ic meeting in the 
Baptist church. Addresses were de- 
livered by President Emory W. Hunt 
and President Emeritus John H. Harris. 
President Hunt, asking the question, 
"What does Armistice Day really 
mean?" emphasized the danger of 
America's being overcome in peace by 
the spirit of the enemy she vanquished 
in war, and made a plea for a real 
"Americanism" in foreign relations, 
above all towards the Orient. 

President Harris reviewed the history 
of Germany's unification and the 
underlying causes of the great war, and 
predicted, as its result, a great and 
permanent moral and spiritual uplift 
of the American people. 

* * -:^ 

The Inter-class Meet, on October 16, 
was won by the sophomores with 32 
points, the freshmen scoring IS, and the 
juniors 4. Only track events were run 
off. 

«- t:- V- 

J. C. Koch, '23, son of Dr. C. D. Koch, 
'98, of Harrisburg, won the cup offered 
the winner of the fall singles tennis 
tournament. 

* * * 

Prof. N. F. Davis took a recent trip 
up the North Branch of the Susque- 
hanna, to inspect geological formations 
near Towanda. 

-X- 'S ^- 

The Rev H. M. Lowry, '77, of Friend- 
ship, N. Y., spent Thanksgiving with 
his sons, George and Kenneth, in Lewis- 
bnrg. During his stay he spoke at the 
chapel exercises. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



^ 



FOOTBALL 



4 



(Continued from Page Three) 

Dooley Sharp 

Right Tackle 

Wargo Geltz 

Right End 

Dayhoff Brophy 

Quarterback 

Kostos Templeton 

Left Halfback 

Wilsbach , Pippa 

Righ Halfback 

Bowser Wertacnic 

Fullback 
Score by periods: 

BuckneU 14 6 0—20 

Dickinson 6 0—6 

Referee — Merritt, Yale. Umpire — 
Price, Swarthmore. Field Judge — Cory- 
ell, Pennsylvania. Head linesman — 
Kline, Cornell. Substitutions— Gdaniec 
for Wilsbach, McGraw for Reed, Fish 
for Templin, Mullen for Babcock, Rich 
for Sharp, Bailey for Brophy, Brophy 
for Bailey. Touchdowns — Bowser 2, 
Julian, Brophy. Goals from touchdown 
— Kostos 2. Time — 15 minute periods. 



Bowser Guth 

Fullback 

Score by perios: 

BuckneU 14 7 7 0— 2S 

Susquehanna 7 — 7 

Touchdowns — Bowser 2, Kostos, Wils- 
bach, Sweeney. Goals from touchdowns 
— Kostos 4, Sweeley. Substitutions — 
Gdaniec for Wilsbach, Morgan for War- 
go, Hahn for Julian, Cole for Bloom, 
Carpenter for Dunmire. Referee — 
Charles Miller. Umpire G. N. Moflatt. 
Head linesman— Morehead. Time of 
quarters — 15, 15, 12, 12 minutes. 

BUCKNELL, 45; GETTYSBURG, 0. 



BUCKNELL, 28; SUSQUEHANNA, 7. 



Susquehanna came to Lewisburg on 
November 20 with a good record and 
high hopes of breaking through the 
Orange and Blue list of victories, and 
went home with the satisfaction of 
having been the only team to score 
against BuckneU on Tustin Field this 
year. 

Long gains by Bowser, Wilsbach and 
Kostos led to a touchdown by Kostos 
early in the first quarter. Bowser ran 
twenty yards for the second, after 
Julian had gained 30 yards on a forward 
pass. 

On a similar procession in the sec- 
ond quarter Wilbach scored. But with 
the score 21-0 against her, Susquehanna 
suddenly took the offensive and on con- 
sistent gains by aU the backs, aided by 
a 30-yard run by Sweeney, scored a 
touchdown. From that point also her 
defense stiffened, and in the second 
quarter BuckneU was ab^e to score only 
once. Bowser making the touchdown 
after several long runs. 

The sensation of the game was an 
80-yard run by Bowser through the 
whole Susquehanna team, but the 
touchdown was disaUowed and the 
baU brought back because of an off- 
side play. 

The lineup: 
BuckneU Susquehanna 

Julian Dunmire 

Left End 

Homan Baker 

Left Tackle 

Morrett Rogawitz 

Left Guard 

Bihl Rearick 

Center 

Reed Getty 

Right Guard 

Dooley Harman 

Right Tackle 

Wargo Bloom 

Right End 

Wilsbach Sweeney 

Left Halfback 

Morgan • • Sweeley 

Quarterback 

Kostos Bannon 

Right Halfback 



(Continued from Page Three) 

Fuhrraan for Larew, Gilliland for Zeig- 
ler, Houtz for Phillips, Weigle for 
Fuhrman, Jamison for Homan, Lauster 
for Reed, Morgan for Bihl, HaU for 
Morrett, Coene for Hall, McGraw for 
Dooley, Dayhoff for Mangan, Gdaniec 
for Kostos, Henning for Bowser. 



-^5- 



THE FINANCIAL SITUATION 



AU who are interested in BuckneU are 
interested in the progress of the cam- 
paign for endowment and equipment 
funds, for with trustees, faculty, alumni 
and student body all enthusiastic for 
enlarged success, the only sine qua non 
is adequate funds. 

We dream dreams and see visions of a 
Greater BuckneU; we shall make them 
realities when we put our money into 
them. 

The University Treasurer reports that 
the first installment of a large propor- 
tion of the subscriptions made last 
Spring has been paid, and new subscrip- 
tions are still coming in. The alumni 
who subscribed to BuckneU, through 
the Baptist Hundred MiUion Dollar 
Fund, will be gratified to learn that the 
University is now receiving monthly al- 
lotments from that source. These 
checks come through the Baptist Edu- 
cation Board of the Northern Baptist 
Convention, and up to November, ag- 
gregate 827,000.00. The amount receiv- 
ed by the Treasurer direct from alumni 
and friends, has reached S20.000 00. 

Now, forty-seven thousand dollars 
seems like a good deal of money, but 
we must realize that BuckneU is al- 
ready a great institution, and is grow- 
ing rapidly, and the need for far larger 
sums is urgent. 

Some are seriously asking why the 
Trustees do not go ahead and put up 
the new engineering buUding. Now, 
none desire to push this building opera- 
tion more than do the Trustees them- 
selves, but good housekeeping has oc- 
casioned delay. It was found absolute- 
ly necessary to increase and improve 
housing facilities for both men and 
women at a cost of over S30,000, which 
includes the purchase, refitting and fur- 
nishing of the Wolfe house, and the 
renovation and furnishing of the East 
and West wings of the Old Main. En- 
larged class rooms, with additional 
chairs, desks, blackboards and work 
tables, cost about ten thousand more. 
Then came the opportunity to purchase 
the property lying south of the Univer- 
sity buildings, the splendid spreading hiU 
crest that wi'l afford opportunity for 
enlargemeift for a century to come. 



The site for the needed engineering 
building was under discussion when the 
farm was put up for sale. The price was 
fifty-five thousand dollars. It was a 
serious hour for the Trustees. The cost 
was high, there was no money on hand, 
and the banks held our notes for seven- 
teen thousand already, but trusting in 
the loyal and generous alumni and 
friends who have helped in days past, 
the farm was purchased. 

Already our class in surveying has 
laid off a plot of about six acres, which 
will be fenced off of the L'niversity 
farm, and added to the campus, and 
gives us the site for the new engineering 
building. 

Will our alumni and friends consider 
the figures given above and remember 
that the income from tuition fees and 
investments is strained to the limit to 
meet the increased running expenses of 
the University, and they have the an- 
swer to the question. 

The Trustees, encouraged with the 
prospect of receiving a miUion and a 
half in four years, compelled by the 
rapidly growing number of students, 
constrained by the need for larger sal- 
aries and more teachers, voluntarily and 
with purpose aforethought, have gone in- 
to debt. The campaign funds that are 
now coming in are helping to pay this 
debt, and they assure us that just as 
soon as they can climb out of the hole 
they are in, they will go into another, 
and the next time it will be for a 
straight hundred thousand dollars for 
the new engineering building, the 
ground for which is now staked off. 

Every dollar paid in brings this new 
building nearer. Send new subscrip- 
tions and cash to John T. Judd, treasur- 
er, Lewisburg, Pa. 

® 

DEATHS 



Harry T. Stevenson, '06. 

Harry T. Stevenson, '06, died sudden- 
ly at his home 49 Hall avenue, Sharon, 
Pa., early in November. Death was 
caused by cerebral apoplexy. 

Mr. Stevenson was a native of Sharon 
and came from the Sharon High School 
to BuckneU, where he was graduated 
with the Class of 1906. 

After graduation from BuckneU he 
was in turn with the Driggs-Seahury 
Co., the Savage Arms Co , and more re- 
cently connected with the stock depart- 
ment of the Standard Tank Car Co. 

His death caused a shock to his wide 
circle of friends throughout the city. 

He was a brother of Edgar T. Steven- 
son, of the Class of 1904, at present city 
editor of the Franklin News-Herald. 

In college he was a member of Phi 
Kappa Psi Fraternity. 

® 

'9S— The Rev. Dr. J. G. Lauderbaugh, 
is beginning the second year of his 
pastorate with the Calvary Baptist 
Church, of Albany, N. Y. On Novem- 
ber 29th he was moderator of an or- 
daining council at Hoosick FaUs, N. Y., 
when some history was made by the 
ordination of a woman, Miss Carolyn 
Hosford, the first woman to be ordained 
to the regular Baptist ministry in New 
York state. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



PERSONALS 



1864 

Dr. Mathias Shawloo is still practic- 
ing medicine at Moulraein, Burma. He 
is a member of the Baptist Mission at 
Moulmein. Dr. Shawloo was born Jan- 
uary 25, 1839. 

1883 

The Rev. John P. Currin royally en- 
tertained the Glee Club during its stay 
in Steelton for the concert which it 
gave in his church on November 12. 
1889 

Joseph Meixell Wolfe has been since 
1916 in the credit department of the 
Fisk Rubber Co. He resides at 1443 
South Broad street, Philadelphia. 

1890 

. Dr. W. C. MacNaul is President of 

the Chicago Alumni Association, which 

is looking forward to an active year. 

1891 

H. W. D. Kirkendall, residing at 212 
Penn avenue, Wenatchee, Wis., is a suc- 
cessful fruit grower in the famous Wen- 
atchee Valley. 

1892 

Warren L. Kauffman has been since 
1906 superintendent in the schools of 
Yonkers, N. Y. 

The Rev. Claude G. Langford is 
pastor of the Baptist Church of Taylor, 
Pa. 

1895 

Joseph C. Carey, who has been with 
the Federal Board of Vocational Train- 
ing since June, at present resides at 140 
North Broad street, Philadelphia. 
1898 

Paul Emil Whitehouse is at present 
teaching at Ramona, Oklahoma. 

Charles W. Clement, of Sunbury, at- 
tended the Susquehanna gams on No- 
vember 20. 

Dr. EVood Herbert Dutton, of Buf- 
falo, visited Dean and Mrs. Phillips, 
November 23. 

1900 

Dr. Daniel E. Hottenstein resides at 
Millersburg, Pa., where he is engaged 
in medical practice. 

George Edward Schilling is principal 
of the Bradford, Pa., High School. 

1901 

Harry L. Maize is practicing law at 
Pottsville, Pa. 

John S. Stephens is with the Ameri- 
can Lead Pencil Co., of New York, as 
snecial representative, - residing at 1103 
Ramona street, Palo Alto, Cal. 

1902 

Raymond Greene is secretary-treas- 
urer of the Mt. Union Tanning Ex- 
tract Co., of Mt. Union, Pa. 

1903 

George Ripley Bliss and Mrs. B'iss, 
formerly Ruth Shorkley, have been 
visiting in Lewisburg prior to their de- 
parture for Fresno, Cal., where they will 
reside in the future. 

James Villard Frampton is a membe"- 
of the law firm of Speer, Frampton, and 
Courtney, of Oil City, and resides at 
169 Mayer street. Oil City. 

Dr. William Nogel Cameron Marsh 
is practicing surgery at 115 Broadway, 
New York City. 



1904 

Charles Randolph Galbraith, ex-'04, 
is a partner in Charles R, Galbraith & 
Co., General Insurance, Franklin, Pa. 
1905 

Roy G. Bostwick and Mrs. Bostwick 
spent Thanksgiving in Lewisburg. 

Misses Ella and Lillian Beale reside 
at 355 Second avenue. North, St. Peters- 
burg, Fia. 

Irvin W. Ziegler is Supervising Prin- 
cipal of the New Cumberland, Pa., 
schools. 

1906 

Henry J. Lose is in the Automotive 
Department of the Standard Steel Car 
Co., as Mechanical Engineer. He re- 
sides at 401 N. Washington street, But- 
ler, Pa. 

Carl Lyon Millward, Superintendent 
of the Milton Schools, with Mrs. Mill- 
ward, attended the Masons' banquet in 
Lewisburg, Novembe'r 19. 

Clarence B. Comstock is a member 
of the firm of Kunkle and Comstock, 
Coal Dealers, Lewisburg, Pa. 

Athol V. Wise, is connected with the 
banking house of Brooks, Stokes & Co., 
of Philadelphia, and lives at Elkins 
Park. Mrs. Wise will be remembered 
as Miss Carrie McCaskie, Class of 1908. 
1907 

Mr. and Mrs. L. K. Hart, formerly 
Mary Galbraith, reside on A street. 
East Bound Brook, N. J. 

Joseph Nelson Weddle is a chemist 
with the By-product Coke Works of the 
Carnegie Steel Co., residing at Wilson, 
Pa. 

Fred R. Zug is slowly recovering 
from a nervous breakdown sustained 
this fall. 

1908 

John V. Gibney is Assistant Me- 
chanical Superintendent with the Na- 
tional Aniline Chemical Co., residing at 
Coatesville, Pa. 

Wallace J. Snyder is head of the Sci- 
ence Department of the Edinboro State 
Normal School. 

John J. Williams is Instructor in Civil 
Engineering at Lafayette College. 
1909 

James Wilbur Grier is President of 
the Grier Bros. Co., of Pittsburgh, re- 
siding at 44 Whitney Ave., Wilkinsburg. 

John Ammon Hess teaches chemistry 
in the Morris High School, of New York 
City, and resides at 22 South 15th Ave., 
Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Charles Wyant Kramer is Chief Engi- 
neer of the Arkansas Natural Gas Co., 
his permanent address being 3143 San- 
ford Place, Shreveport, La. 

Dr. Wm. Leiser, 3rd, practises medi- 
cine in Reading, residing at 336 N. 9th 
street. 

Jose A. Villalon is now located at 168 
Ambridge street, Gary, Ind. 

Mary E. Young is teaching at Pal- 
myra, N. J., residing at 833 Highland 
avenue. 

1910 

Mildred Gathers is teaching at Bay- 
onne, N. J., her Bayojme address being 
43 W. 33rd street. 

George B. Schroyer is Division Oper- 
ator for the Pennsylvania R. R., with 
headquarters at the Pennsylvania 
Building, Wilmington, Del. 

Mary Slawson resides at Tunkhan- 
nock. Pa. 

Florence V. Stauffer is head of the 
English Department in the Perth Am- 
boy, N. J., High School. 



Chester Joseph Terrill is head of the 
Commercial Department of the Albany, 
N. Y., High School.- He is married and 
has two children. He resides at 67 N. 
Allen street. 

Mrs. Arno Viehover, formerly Mabel 
Johnson, resides at Silesia, Md. 

Dr. Kathalyn Voorhis is practising 
medicine at 28 Pleasant street, Wor- 
cester, Mass. 

1911 

The Rev. N. K. Grossman, of Coates- 
ville, Pa., visited his Alma Mater re- 
cently. 

Arthur Clay Fairchild is Superinten- 
dent of the Penn Public Service Corpor- 
ation, at Indiana, Pa. 

Elizabeth S. Kates teaches in the 
MillviUe, N. J., High School. 

Dr. Miner Raymond Kendall is a 
specialist in diseases of the ear, nose 
■ and throat, with offices at 614 Osborn 
Building, Cleveland, O. 

LeRoy McFarland is teaching in the 
Mt. Pleasant Academy, Ossining-on- 
Hudson, N. Y. 

Laura McGann is teaching in the Al- 
toona High School. 

1912 

A. C. Conner is teaching manual 
training in the Lower Merion School, 
Ardmore, and resides at 224 Ardmore 
avenue, Ardmore. Mr. and Mrs. Bron- 
son, fromerly Alberta Bronson, have 
four children. 

Richard D. Gettys, who is located at 
Mykawa, Texas, was a recent Lewis- 
burg visitor. 

Leone A. Harice is associated with her 
father in landscape gardening in Cleve- 
land, residing at 3785 W. 143rd street. 
West Park, Ohio. 

George E. O'Brien is a foreman with 
the American Sheet and Tin Plate Co., 
at Vandergrift, Pa. 

Victor Schmidt has gone this year 
to the Tome School, where he is teach- 
ing Mechanical Drawing and coaching. 
1913 

Walter Herbert Edwards is office 
draftsman to Pilot Engineer with the 
B. & O. R. R. Co., at Wheeling, W. Va., 
residing at Lenox Addition, Wheeling. 

Charles Adam Fryling is superinten- 
dent of 

Max Grossman is manager of the L. 
Grossman Mercantile Co , of Mt. 
Carmel. 

Ruth Tustin Heinsling teaches the 
third grade in the Altoona schools. She 
resides at 2100 W. Chestnut avenue. 

Charles Loy Sanders has accepted a 
position as head of the department of 
English in the Greenwich, Conn., High 
School, and is now residing at 81 Sher- 
wood Place, Greenwich. 

Dr. Joseph P. Shearer is Assistant 
Surgeon at the Geisinger Hospital, Dan- 
ville, Pa. 

Leslie W. Stout in September, accept- 
ed the position of Secretary- Treasurer 
of the Industrial Trust Co., of Wilming- 
ton, Del. 

1914 

H. Walter Baker is a teacher in the 
Sioux City, la.. High School. 

Robert C. Hagan is practicing law in 
LTniontown. Arthur R. Johnson is in 
the sales department of the Havs Mfg. 
Co., of Erie, and resides at 1021 W. ISth 
street. 

William Stanley Reitz is Assistant 
Supervisor on the Atlantic Division of 
the Pennsylvania R. R., with head- 
quarters at 22 Federal street, Camden, 
N.J. 



10 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



H. B. Weaver spent the summer 
quarter at Chicago University, doing 
work in the graduate department of 
pedagogy. He is now located at Pitts- 
burgh. 

1915 

William A. Affron is Chief Inspecting 
Engineer for the Pratt & Cady Co., of 
Hartford, Conn., residing at 372 Wood- 
land street, Hartford. 

Dr. Robert M. Cochrane, ex-'15, has 
offices at 215J Main street, Greensburg, 
Pa. 

Dr. Albert E. Coughanour, ex-'15, is 
practicing medicine at Point Marion, 
Pa. 

The Rev. Harold S. Myatt holds the 
pastorate of the Baptist Church of Clif- 
ford, Pa. 

Charles E. Sellers is head of the Sci- 
ence Department of the Loomis Insti- 
tute, Windsor, Conn. 
1916 

Sarah G. Barnitz is a typist and file 
clerk in the Bureau of War Risk In- 
surance, residing at 658 Morris street, 
Washington. 

Ruth E. Embrey teaches in the Dun- 
bar Township, Pa., High School. 

The Rev. Charles E. Tilton is pastor 
of the Fairmount Baptist Church, New- 
ark, N. J. He resides at 191 South 6th 
street, Newark, N. J. 

Ruby Jane Young is at present teach- 
ing English in the Watsontown High 
School. 

1917 

Ruth Pauline Barthold is an instruc- 
tor in the Wilmington, Del., High 
School. 

Nellylou Gardner is in the English 
Department of the Roselle, N. J., High 
School. 

Charles D. Maurer is on the Engi- 
neer Corps of the Pennsylvania R. R. 
Co., residing at 449 E. Washington 
street. New Castle, Pa. 

Olive E. Moore is teaching in the 
Bridgeton, N. J., High School. 

Herman F. Reich is an attorney in 
Sunbury, with offices in the Witmer 
Bldg. 

1918 

Jack Allen, ex-'18, is with the Endi- 
cott-Johnson Corporation at Johnson 
City, N. Y. 

William Palmer Bachman is a Civil 
Engineer with the Pennsy, residing at 
511 Reagan street, Sunbury, Pa. 

Elmer R. Conner is a member of the 
firm of A. E. Conner and Son, 610 Law 
avenue, EUwood City, Pa. 

Dorothea Frances Meek is teaching 
in the Picture Rocks Schools. 

George H. Miles is instructor and ath- 
letic director in the West Newton, Pa., 
High School. 

Evelyn E. Pugh is teaching biology 
in the Trenton High School, residing at 
30 McKinley avenue, Trenton, N. J. 
1919 

Naomi B. Lane is head of the Home 
Economics Department, and dietitian 
at the New Jersey State Home for Girls, 
Trenton, N. J. 

Frank Ames Lawrence is with the 
Empire Gas and Fuel Co., at Duncan, 
Okla. 

Henry Sherman Northrop is teaching 
in the Wyalusing, Pa., High School. 

Helen Trump is teaching this year in 
the Jamesburg, N. J., High School. She 
may be adressed at Box 91, Jamesburg. 

Alice Ferris is teaching at Wilson Col- 
lege, Chambersburg, Pa. 



Helen Hoffa and Thelora Smith are 
teaching at Penn Hall, Chambersburg, 
Pa. 

1920 

Stephen Dimlich is at present with 
the Atlas Powder Co., at Stamford, 
Conn., residing at 68 Grove street. 

Homer M. Sanders is pursuing work 
toward a Master's degree at the Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh. 

Ruth P. Clark is teaching at Hatboro, 
Pa. 

® 

MARRIAGES 



Fisher-McClure 

Among the most charming weddings 
of recent years in Lewisburg, was that 
of Miss Margaret McClure, graduate of 
Bucknell Institute and Smith College, 
and later instructor in French at Buck- 
nell, and Howard, Voelkler Fisher, of 
the Class of 1913*, of Tamaqua. The 
ceremony was performed by the Rev. 
F. B. Everitt in the First Presbyterian 
Church, which was crowded to capacity. 
Mrs. W. Neil Baker, Institute, '11, was 
matron of honor, while Anthony J. 
Murray, '13, was best man. Following 
the wedding a reception was held at 
the McClure home on University ave- 
nue, after which the wedding party left 
on the private car of Superintendent 
Fisher, father of the groom. 

After a honeymoon trip south, Mr. 
and Mrs. Fisher will be at home in 
Tamaqua. 

Rice-Laning 

Mr. and Mrs. William T. Laning 
announce the marriage of their daugh- 
ter, Charlotte Probasco, to Mr. Fred 
Drexel Rice, on Saturday the sixteenth 
of October, one thousand nine hundred 
and twenty, at Bridgeton, N. J. 

The bride was attended by Miss Hen- 
r'ptta Heinsling, a classmate at Buck- 
nell. 

The bridegroom served as a pay- 
master during the war, and is at present 
Eastern representative of the Eaton 
Axel Co., of Cleveland. 

Hale-Lawrence 

Miss Ruth Hale, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Chas. Hale, of Somerville, N. J., 
and Mr. Otto Lawrence, ex-'17, were 
married, Monday. November 8, in Som- 
merville. 

"Deac." is employed by the Calco 
Chemical Works of that town as "asst- 
super." 

Seebach-Hare 

'20 — Julius F. Seebach, Jr., married 
Mary Esther Hare, of Holidaysburg, 
Pa., shortly after commencement last 
June. At present Mr. Seebach is the 
head of the French department at St. 
John's School, Manlius, N. Y. They 
are living in newly furnished apart- 
ments on Main street, Manlius. 
S 



Dr. S. 



Calvin Smith 

Addresses Doctors 



Dr. S. Calvin Smith, '01, of Philadel- 
phia, read a paper on "Practical Points 
in Heart Diagnoses" before the Medi- 
cal Society of the State of Pennsyl- 
vania at its meeting in Pittsburgh on 
October 5. The paper was very favor- 
ably received and commented on. 
® 

Charles B. Moore, '20, visited in 
Lewisburg during November. 



ARDA C. BOWSER, FULLBACK 

"Playing on a Big Three team or any 
other big eleven. Bowser would have 
been the most discussed player in the 
East. This big boy, who weighs 190 
pounds, scored 113 of Bucknell's 245 
points. The brand of football that he 
played all year stamps him as one of 
the greatest fullbacks in the entire 
United States of America". Thus Ross 
Kauftman, of the Philadelphia North 
American, in explaining his choice of 
Bowser for All-Eastern fullback. 

"Fullback honors should go to Bow- 
ser, of Bucknell. He has speed with his 
weight, and uses every ounce of his 
strength to hit the line when asked to. 
He punts and is dangerous in placement 
kicking anywhere inside the 60-yard 
line. He is also a good interferer when 
not carrying the ball". So speaks Jack 
Southerland, Lafayette coach, in nam- 
ing Bowser on the All-Pennsylvania 
eleven. 

"The best all-around back seen on 
the Navy field in years". Such is the 
opinion of Coach Folwell, of the An- 
napolis team. And Lieutenant Com- 
mander Morrison, of the Naval Acade- 
my says:' "With a man like him in our 
backfield we could have won the Prince- 
ton game. On one of the big Eastern 
teams his praises would have been sung 
from one end of the country to another. 
He is big and strong and can do any- 
thing. 

When a veteran sporting writer and 
coaches of opposing teams speak thus 
enthusiastically of the Orange and Blue 
fullback, it is clearly no mere partiality 
of Bucknell supporters which asserts that 
he stands in the front rank of modern 
players. 

What is it that puts him there? 

Bowser is six feet two inches tall and 
weighs 195 pounds. He is beautifully 
built and stands out even among big 
men by his erectness and poise. But 
even more his litheness and speed are 
remarkable in a man of his size. And 
with this physical equipment goes a 
mental alertness and football sense, 
which makes him the player he is. No 
man with mere strength and speed as 
his assets could stand out as the best 
fullback in the East, perhaps in the 
country. It is the mental equipment 
which enables him to take full advan- 
tage of "Pete" Reynolds' canny coach- 
in"', and develop technique. 

Perhaps the best feature of Bowser's 
makeup is, however, not his prowess on 
the field, but his ability to bear his 
honors modestly. To all appearances he 
is utterly unspoiled bv the fame thus 
suddenly thrust upon t^im and the ef- 
fect of th's attit'ide i*: reflected in the 
sincere liking of his fellow-students, for 
the man, wholly apart from their ad- 
miration for the "hero". 

To the alumni this evidence of real 
character will suggest the reflection that 
it is in a very wide sense, an evidence 
of Bucknell training. For Bowser is a 
second-generation Bucl:ne'lian. He is 
the son of the Rev. Addison B. Bowser, 
who will be known to alumni of the 
later eighties as a member of '88, and 
who is at present fami'iar to Pennsyl- 
vania Baptists, as pastor of the First 
Baptist Church of Ford City. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 

Dear Bucknell 



11 



't^i 



SAMUEL SEARS MERRIMAN, 86. 



''■' ^ i n^TTTTfrYj 



i 



^ 



wr^ 



r 



1. Dear Bucknell, oft of theewere thinking,Andmem!ries fond come trooping by ; The 
2 We burn the in- cense of af - fec-tion,As in thy sa-cred fanes we meet,While 
3- To thee we swear ourproud al - le-giance,Thy loy-al sons are we, and true, Nor 



;'^'''- r' i [ 1^ p F i FFr i i^J^JJ J J 



Ur=4 



rjTi^ 



i^ 



m 



p^ 



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F 



tire-less stars may cease their blink-mg, But thoughtsof thee shall nev - er die; And 
down the aisles of rec-ol - lec-tion Come throng-ing forms we love to greet; And 
time, nor tide, nor for-tune's pageants Shall daunt the Or-ange and the Blue;Then 



i^nj n t \' ^ 



m 



^-^ ^4 



st 



^^^f 



/ 



i=^ 



p^m 



g= 



the' the years steal swift - ly o'er us, And win - ter comeswith bi- ting sting, .Our 

tho'life's bit - ter storms sweep o'er us. And pleas-ure bides on fleet-ing wing, Our 

with thy glo - ry e'er be - fore us, Our lov - ing tnb - ute we will bring, And 



-^ I ' ' ^ f 1 '^ 1' ^ "^ 1' ^ ^n' ' ' ^ ^^^^ 



iP^f f f f i '^##^^ 




heartswithyouth's un- daunt - ed cho-rus. Shall e'er with praise of Buck- nell ring. 

hearts shall blend in lov - ing cho- rus, While Al - ma Ma- ter's praise we sing. 

once a - gain in heart - y cho-rus, Thy praisedear Buck- nell we will sing. 



S 



r^ f; ^ V T^ff^ 



^ 



i 



iM 



I 



"DEAR BUCKNELL" 

The song published this month is the one at present most nearly answering the uses of an "Alma Mater". It 
is sung by the Glee Club on its concert tours and at Commencement, but rarely on other occasions. 

The objection sometimes raised against this song is that its music is old, formerly used in an English drinking 
sonj, and later as a Yale song. 

Certainly the words express the proper sentiment and blend well with the music. 



12 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



ALUMNUS PRAISES FACULTY Bishop Vincent a Bucknellian 



A very frank testimonial to the in- 
fluence of the Bucknell faculty on his 
religious life is given by Henry G. W. 
Smith, of the class of 1912, in a recent 
communication to the "Baptist". 

Responding to an appeal by a theo- 
logical student for a statement by the 
men who have gone out as to the value 
of the teaching they had received, Mr. 
Smith says: 

My home training was Christian, 
father being a minister. He played 
with us all, and seldom, if ever, caution- 
ed us against the dangers of scientific 
study. He talked to us of geology, bi- 
ology, astronomy, and commended me 
when in high school I read Darwin's 
"Descent of Man". Our table, with 
mother and father and seven children 
around it, was always an open forum, 
and I do not remember ever having 
been told before going away to college, 
"Either you must believe this or you 
are not a Christian". "The truth" was 
the rule of the family. 

I entered Bucknell in preparation for 
the ministry in 1909. I wanted to go 
into the ministry, but my consecration 
was not anything like so keen as it 
should have been, and there were with- 
in me all sorts of budding doubt and 
cynicism. Contact with the student 
body did not greatly help me religious- 
ly, though it did not greatly hinder me 
either; and there was not a church in 
town where I was accustomed to feel 
the slightest amount of soul better- 
ment after having attended the ser- 
vices, which I did regularly. On the 
other hand, every instructor under 
whom I sat gave evidence that he was 
worthy of respect in his fairness, and 
four of them, among whom was the 
head of the biology department, talked 
with me personally with the deepest 
reverence relative to the great truths 
which the Bible contains. These men, 
and especially the teacher of English 
Bible, kept me from giving up the idea 
of going on with the work of prepar- 
ing for the ministry. They increased 
my reverence and made me enjoy a 
more real prayer. 

Mr. Smith also pays tribute to the 
value of the training received at Crozer 
Seminary, of which Dr. Milton G. Evans 
is president, in clearly defining the pur- 
pose which came into his life as a re- 
sult of his college training. 



-^■ 



How many Bucknellians know that 
Bishop John Heyl Vincent, of the 
Methodist church, founder of the great- 
est and foremost of the chautauquas, 
the Lakeside Assembly on Chautauqua 
Lake, New York, got many of his ideas 
for the spread of education in the old 
Academy at Lewisburg, later Bucknell. 
The memorial service that was attend- 
ed by thousands at the Chautauqua As- 
sembly, Sunday afternoon, August 1, 
brought out this point in the life of 
this great American preacher and edu- 
cator, who died at his home in Chicago 
on May 9, 1920, the end coming sudden- 
ly, but peacefully to close a life of ex- 
ceptional effort for uplifting others. 

The sketch of his life that is made 
official, approved by his nephew, Henry 
B. Vincent, of Erie, Pa., connected with 
the musical department of Chautauqua, 
states that he was born in Tuscaloosa, 
Alabama, Feb. 23, 1832, and when he 
was six years old, his parents removed 
to Northumberland county, Pennsyl- 
vania, and as a boy he studied at the 
Milton and Lewisburg Academies, but 
never took a college course. He was 
inclined towards the ministry, and be- 
came an exhorter and was licensed to 
preach in 1850. He was pastor of the 
church in Galena, Illinois, that General 
Ulysses S. Grant attended. In 1865, he 
established the Northwestern Sunday 
School Quarterly in Chicago, and later, 
after traveling in Egypt and the Holy 
Land, he became associated with Lewis 
Miller, of Akron, Ohio, and evolved the 
idea of a normal Sunday School, from 
which came the first Sunday School as- 
sembly at Fair Point, now Chautauqua, 
N. Y. Thus Lewisburg and Bucknell, 
with its christian educational standards, 
can lay claim to starting another great 
man in the right way along the paths 
of life to work goodness to his fellows. 
The methods of Bishop Vincent have 
worked out to the enlightenment of 
thousands. 

® 

Glee Club Pleases 



BUCKNELL OF TODAY 

(Continued from Page Six) 

atories of the country were installed. 
Accommodations were made for some 
forty students in the courses. In ad- 
dition to the general course in Bacteri- 
ology which has been presented for 
years, a course was designed and pre- 
sented especially for the students in the 
Household Arts course. Later a course 
in Advanced Bacteriology, dealing with 
the cultural characteristics and biologi- 
cal reactions of pathogenic bacteria was 
offered. This course is supplemented 
by a lecture course in Sanitary Science 
and bridges a gap in the training of the 
pre-medical student, and that one aim- 
ing to specialize in anyone of the 
various public health laboratories m 
the country. 



The Connellsville Daily News says of 
the Glee Club concert on November 29: 

The First Baptist church was crowd- 
ed to its utmost capacity last evening, 
when the Bucknell University musical 
clubs rendered a diversified program, 
which delighted the audience from the 
opening number until the finale. 

"The many friends of Bucknell in the 
Connellsville and Dunbar township sec- 
tion greeted the students from their 
alma mater yesterday, and many in- 
formal reunions of former acquaintances 
were enjoyed. 

That Prof. Stolz, head of the music 
department of the university, has a 
capable and talented group of young 
musicians was the opinion of the music 
lovers of the city, and the enterprise of 
the Rev. J. Earle Edwards, pastor of 
the church, in bringing them to Con- 
nellsville without any cost to the audi.- 
tors, last evening, was favorably com- 
mented upon". 

® 

GLEE CLUB CONCERTS 

The Glee Club delighted large houses 
at the Williamsport High School, De- 
cember 8, and at Sharaokin, December 
10. 



Robey and Wilcox Of- 
ficers of New Company 

Louis W. Robey, '04, and Walter S. 
Wilcox, '04, are the President and Treas- 
urer, respectively, of the newly organiz- 
ed "Commercial Advance Corporation". 

To alumni interested in investments, 
the names of the men who head this 
new corporation will be an excellent 
guarantee of its good faith and business- 
like management. 

rhe offices of the new firm are at 
201 Fuller Building, 10 South Eigh- 
teenth Street, Phila4elphia. 

® 

Chicagoans Alive 

The Rev. F. H. Fahringer, pastor of 
the South Chicago Baptist Church, has 
been utilizing his old experience as 
leader of one of the best bands Bucknell 
ever had, by organizing a Sunday 
School Orchestra. By using this or- 
chestra at Sunday evening service, he 
has doubled the attendance. 

The Rev. L. J. Velte is doing excel- 
lent work as pastor of the Tabernacle 
Baptist Church, of Chicago, and has 
been re-elected Secretary of the Chicago 
Baptist Ministers' Conference. He re- 
sides at 3300 Park Avenue. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. J. Parmenter, '14, 
and son, Robert, Jr., have recently 
moved into their own home at 4318 
Berkley Avenue. Mr. Parmenter is em- 
ployed in the Engineering Department 
of the Public Utilities Company, of 
Chicago. 

■ ® 

The Bucknell Lyceum 

A move .toward the revival of the 
type of training given in the long ex- 
tinct Euepia, Theta Alpha, and Zeta 
societies was inaugurated this month, 
with the organization of the "Bucknell 
Lyceum", a co-educational society hold- 
ing weekly meetings devoted to art 
literature, music, and the discussion of 
current topics of general interest. 

Membership is open to all undergrad- 
uates, and at the first meeting after 
organization about seventy-five were 
present and a short literary and musi- 
cal program was well given. The meet- 
ing ended with an old-fashioned spelling 
bee. 

Weekly meetings wi'l be held during 
fhe winter months. 



-(S)- 



At Lafayette 



A goodly number of alumni rooted for 
the Orange and Blue at Easton on No- 
vember 6. Among those seen at the 
game were: R. K. Bell. '20; Wm. S. 
Baldwin. '09; J. R. Golightlv. '14; Ray- 
.mond Lewis, '19, and wife; Miller John- 
son, '20; Pauline Schenck. '20; Howard 
Liebensberger, '17, and wife, formerly 
Mary Reese, '17; D. R. McCain. '05: 
B'air Jaekel, ',03: Dr. A. R. Garner. '99; 
Aelfric James, '08; Duward Frampton, 
ex-'12; Robert Downing, '18: Everett 
Jones, '19; A. G. Gihbs. '20: Char'es 
Zeller, ex-'21 : H. L. Fondi. '18; C. W. 
Lotte. '14; Helen Reed, '17: R. J. W. 
Templin, '17: John J. Williams. '08; 
Registrar Thomas, and Prof. C. A. 
Lindemann, represented the faculty, 
and J. H. Prowant and Eyre Spyker, 
the town, while about 200 undergradu- 
ates helped to fill the Bucknell cheering 
section. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



13 



ADVERTISING RATES 2% for cash in 30 days. 

ITime 4 Times 6 Times 

1 incli deep, 1 column ......$ 1.00 $ 3.50 S 5.00 CIRCULATION. 1920, 2100; 1921, 2500. 

1 inch deep, 3 columns 3.00 10.00 14.00 

Vi page 6.00 22.50 32.00 Copy due first of month. Send your ad to 

V2 page 9.00 33.00 48.00 „ c TrvTruirxT t o,„:oK„„r d. 

Full Page 15.00 57.50 85.00 H. S. EVERETT, Lewisburg, Pa. 

Teachers for N ATI O N A L TEACH ERS' AG EN CY, I HC. schools for 

Schools Teachers 

•D. H. Cook, Mgr., 326-27-28 Perry BIdg., 1530 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

"I HAVE PROMOTED OVER 15,000 TEACHERS. WHY NOT YOU?"— D. H. Cook. 

Bucknell Graduates Wanted, Have Placed Hundreds of Them 



Under the Same Management Thirty- 
Seven Years 
The School Bulletin Teachers' 
Agency has on its lists many Buck- 
nell graduates, and has placed Buck- 
nell men and women in high and nor- 
mal schools in New York, New Jer- 
sey, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, 
Vermont, Kentucky, West Virginia 
and Texas. An agency which per- 
sonally recommends its members to 
places for which it has been asked 
to offer candidates. Registration 
blanks and full information on re- 
quest. 
C.W. Bardeen, Mgr., Syracuse, N. Y. 



Modern Teachers' 
Bureau 

ICO2 Market St., Philadelphia 
Needs Hundreds of High Grade 
Teachers for every department of 
educational work. 

FREE REGISTRATION 

and no expense unless position is 
secured. 



MOORE BUILDING 
SUPPLY CO. 

. Milton, Pa. 

Distributors of 

All Kinds of Building 
Material 

Agents for 

Johns-Manville Co. 



BUCKINELL UINIVERSITV 

EMORY W. HUNT, D. D., LL. D., PRESIDENT 

Alumni : Help us maintain and increase a waiting list of applicants for admission by filling 



out the blanks below: 

B. F. Thomas, Registrar. 

Dear Sir: — 

The following are prospective 
college students of the first rank and 
should be on Bucknell's roll next fall. 
[ recommend them on the basis of 
scholarship and leadership. 



Signed 



B. F. Thomas, Registrar. 
Dear Sir: — 

Please send information about 
. . Arts Courses 
..Preparation for Ministry 
. .Preparation for Teaching 
..Preparation for Law 
..Preparation for Medicine 
. .Preparation for Business 
. .Preparation for Social Work 
..Mechanical Engineering 
. . Electrical Engineering 
. . Civil Engineering 
. . Chemical Engineering 
. .Science Courses 
. .School of Music 
. .General Catalog 
. .Campus Views 
. .Expenses 
. . Application for Admission 

To 

signed 



Established, 1892 
First Instruction, 1853 



BUCKNELL UNIVERSITY 



THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC 



11 Teachers 
177 Pupils 



Emory W. Hunt, Pres. 
Paul G. Stolz, '08, Director 

The Supervisor's Course in the School of Music is based on Commonwealth requirements, and students com- 
pleting the course are exempt from examination. 



COURSES: 



Piano, 


4 yrs. 


Violincello, 


4 yrs. 


Voice, . 4 yrs. 


Orchestra 


Pipe Organ, 


4 yrs. 


Contrabass, 


4 yrs. 


Teachers' Course, 4 yrs. 


History 


Violin, 


4 yrs. 


Viola 




Harmony, 
Theory. 


Oratorio 
Opera 



14 



These Lewisburg Firms Support the Monthly ; Patronize Them. 



COLLEGE IIVIV 



Inseparably Linked With Life "On the Hill" 
GOOD EATS AND GOOD TIMES, THE LAW AND PROPHETS OF OUR MENU 

"ON THE QUADRANGLE" 



PAYNE, '09 



Lewisburg Trust 
and Safe Deposit Co. 

Commenced Business 1907. 

CAPITAL $125,000 

SURPLUS AND PROFITS, 87,000 
DEPOSITS 1,025,000 

Your Business 
Solicited, 

Appreciated, 

and Protected 

DANIEL F. GREEN, Treas. 

Renew Your Acquaintance With 

"The Purity Special" Sundae. 

Take home with you a box of our 

HOMEMADE CANDY. 

THE PURITY 
W. A. BLAIR 

FRESH AND SMOKED MEATS 

Wholesaler of Pork, Sausage, etc. 

Fancy and Staple Groceries 

OYSTERS IN SEASON. 

J. FRED ZELLER 

J EWELER and 
OPTOMETRIST 



J. C. REEDY 

Dealer In 

Furniture and Carpets 

530 Market Street 

THE 

SHIELDS 

Photographic 
Studio 

Distinctive Stationery 

AT 

BAKER'S PHARMACY 

DELMAR INN 



A. J. DUNKLE, Prop. 



WAI N I ES 

Opposite the Trust Co. 
The Home of 

HOMEMADE ICE CREAM 
Lunchenette and Parlor 

"GRADS". Your MaH Orders for 

Bucknell or Fraternity Felt and 

Leather Goods will receive our 

Prompt and Careful Attention. 

H. F. DONEHOWER 

"Varsity Outfitter" 

W. L. DONEHOWER, '06, Mgr. 

JAS. P. BENNETT 

Local and 
Long Distance Hauling 

Phone 84 Lewisburg 

University Book 
Store 

Books, Stationery 
and School Supplies 

Mail Orders Promptly 
Attended to 

We Pay Postage 

WE WANT YOUR SHIRTS 

Mail 'em in 
Peerless Laundry 

Thompson, '04. Donehower, '06 

Milton Lewisburg Sunbury 

E. C. NOLL 

THE 
FEED MAN 

DR. E. S. HEISER 

DRUGGIST 
Developing and Printing 

IRHY'S 
SHOE STORE 

A. J. Irey, '79. 



Union National Bank 

strong Capital and Surplus 

Government Supervision 

Member Federal Reserve 



Employees Acquainted with 
Business and College World. 



SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES 

SAVINGS DEPARTMENT 

TRAVELERS' CHECKS 



John K. Kremer, Cashier. 

RAEZER'S 

Casli and Carry Groceries 
Lewisburg and Milton. 

H. J. Nogei & Bro. 

Je^veJer and Optometrist 

Lewisburg, Pennsylvania 



Engraving 



Watch Repairing 



GRENOBLE BROS. 

University Jewelers 

Exclusive Columbia Agents 

STEININGER CAFE 

Open 6 a. m. to 1.30 a. m. 

Rooms With Hot and Cold Running 

Water 

GEO. E. IRVIN, Mgr. 

Third & Market St., Lewisburg, Pa. 

Herman & Leiser 

Dry Goods, Notions, and 

Ladies' Ready-to- Wear 

Apparel. 



W. C. Walls, 
Pres. 



John W. Bucher, 
Cash. 



The Lewisburg National Bank 

The oldest Bank in Union County. 
Established 1853. Capital $100,000. 
Surplus and Profits SIOO.OOO. 3% In- 
terest paid on Savings Accounts. 

HILL'S DRUG STORES 

3 Stores 3 
Lewisburg, Penna. 



Transact Your Business In Lewisburg Through Our Advertisers. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



15 



The Alumni Business and Professional 

Directory 

During the past few years over five nunarea (500) Bucknell Students nave taken 
out Life Insurance policies witn tne Equitable Life of loTiva. Successful men invari- 
ably are men ■wbo, in early years, realized tne value of life insurance. 

Life Insurance makes for Success 

Tyson, 11 RICE ^ TYSON. Gen. Agts., 906 Kunkel Bldg., Harrisburg, Pa. 



Andrew A. Leiser 
U. at L.. -69 



Andrew A. Leiser, Jr. 
B. U.. '98, Yale, '99 



Law Offices of 
Andrew Albright Leiser 
Andrew Albright Leiser, Jr. 

Lewisburgh, Union County 
Pennsylvania 

H. B. WEAVER, '14 

Catalogs, Yearbooks, House 
Organs. 

THE PITTSBURGH PRINT- 
ING CO. 

530 Fernando St., 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 



G. F. RASSWEILER 

Professor of Public Speaking, 

BUCKNELL UNIV. 

Dramatic Reader, Lecturer, and 
Entertainer. 

Ralph L. Belford, '05 

Attorney-at-Law 



Milton, Pa, 



WM. R. FOLLMER 

ATTORNEY-AT-LAW 
Notary in Office 



Lewisburg 



Pennsylvania 



Jobli F. Winkelblecb, '14 
Invest in a Farm! 

E. A. STROUT FARM AGENCY 
Knows the Good Ones, 
Advertises and Sells Them. 
Phone 113R8 Lewisburg, Pa. 



G. G. PAINTER, '17, Secretary 



Printers of the Alumni Monthly 



Tke Sun Printing fe? Binding Co., Inc. 

Designers and Producers of 

DISTINCTIVE PRINTING 

Booklets, Catalogues, Direct-ty-Mail Advertising, Office Forms, Etc. 

Sun Building, WiUiamsport, Pa. 



WHEN IN ATLANTIC CITY 

Remember 

The Chelsea Baptist Church 

is on Atlantic Ave., between 

Brighton and Morris 



It is known as 
"The Stranger's Sabbath Home" 



The Minister, 

THOMAS J. CROSS, D.D., '91 

will be glad to welcome you and the 
service will help you 



Harold C, Edwards,' 1 5 

Attorney-at-Law 

Stroudsburg, Penna. 

Geo. P. Miller, '84 

FIRE INSURANCE 

82 University Ave., Lewisburg, Pa. 



New and Used Motors Phone 

Heavy Construction Calvert 

Rewinding 3573 

The Keystone Electric Co. 
R. K. HOKE, '15 

108 S. Grant St., Baltimore, Md. 

A. Donald Gray, '14 
Landscape Architect 



8120 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, Ohio 



16 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



Bucknell Alumni Organizing 
Million Dollar Corporation 

The Corporation Will Engage in Commercial Banking, Loaning 
on Accounts Receivable to Substantial Manufacturers, Job- 
bers and Wholesalers 



COMMERCIAL ADVANCE CORPORATION 



Capitalization 



.$1,000,000 



20,000 shares of 8% cumulative Preferred Stock, non-assessable. Par value 150.00 per share 

20,000 shares Common Stock no par value. 

The business of the corporation is usually known as Commercial Banking, the advancing of money on open 
accounts, to responsible wholesalers, jobbers and manufacturers, who guarantee the payment thereof. Upon 
receipt of the proper documents S0% of the face value of the account is advanced, the balance being paid only as 
collections are received. Collection of the accounts is in the hands of the company borrowing the money. 

There is a demand for this kind of service far in excess of the ability of the existing companies to supply. 

The profits are exceedingly satisfactory. Existing companies are paying the required dividends on their 
Preferred stock and earning an additional 25% to 35V' on their Common Stock. 

Safety is the keynote of the business. Money is advanced only on the best of security to concerns that 
pass a rigid credit examination. 



Offi 



cers 



LOUIS W. ROBEY, President. 

Alumnus of Bucknell University, Class of '04. 

President of the Overbrook Bank, Phila. 
Director of the Parkway Trust Co., Phila. 
Head of Real Estate Law, Temple University, 

Phila. 
NORMAN H. HANNAH, Vice President. 

President of the Northeastern Title and Trust 

Co., Phila. 
FRANK H. TUFT, Vice President. 

Cashier of the American Bank and Trust Co., 

Phila. 



ALEXANDER L. SKILTON, Secretary. 
Vice President of the Northeg 
Trust_Ciu_ElH 

.__ — Vice~President of the Overbrook Bank, Phila. 
WALTER S. WILCOX, Treasurer and General 
Manager. 

Alumnus of Bucknell University, Class of '04. 

For five years Registrar and Business Man- 
ager of Bucknell. 

Treasurer of Richards Manufacturing Corpor- 
ation, Phila. 

Lecturer in Department of Commerce, Temple 
University, Phila. 



Subscription Terms 



One share of Preferred Stock and one share of Common Stock are being sold for a limited time at 860.00 
per block, payable $10 00 with the subscription, and the balance .$10.00 per month. 
For more complete information address 

WALTER S. WILCOX, Treas., 

2C1 Fuller Bldg., 10 South 18th St., 

PhUadelphii, Pa. 



Make a Christmas Gift that will be permanent 
and profitable. 

Invest for Safety and Income. 

Invest v\^ith those who are known to you. 



Bucknell Alumni Mo 



Vol. V 



Lewisburg, Pa., January, 1921 





THE NEW YORK BANQUET 






Dr. A. J. Rowland: An Appreciation — Glee Club Western Trip 

— Dr. Goldsmith on Reorganization — Trustees 

Mid-Winter Meeting 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



Buckneil^Alumni Monthly 

LEO L. ROCKVv^ELL, '07, 
Editor 
H. S. EVERETT, '12, 
Advertising Manager 

Published monthly during the college 
year by the Bucknell University 
Alumni Association. 

Entered as second-class mail matter 
at the Postoffice at Lewisburg, Pa., 
under the act of Congress, March 3, 
1879. 

Annual subscription to non-members, 
$2.00. 

To life members under the $10 plan, 
$1.50. 

To life members under the new plan, 
it is sent gratis. 

To annual members under the new 
plan, subscription is included in the 
annual dues. 

Checks should be made payable to 
Frank M. Simpson, Treas. 



ALUMNI OPINION 
SHALL WE REORGANIZE? 



WANTED - COMPOSERS 



AX-GRINDING AND 

OTHER MATTERS 



It the author of the "ax-grinding" 
epistle in the December issue aimed at 
stirring up something, in the Editor's 
opinion he succeeded. It is evident 
that he opened a live topic. 

Fortunately the up-stirring has re- 
sulted in the contribution of some con- 
structive suggestions, which will be 
found in the "Open Forum" of this is- 
sue. 

The Editor dislikes to break into a dis- 
cussion which is so well under way, but 
since the Truth-seeker definitely chal- 
lenged him to a defense of the Alumni 
Association, he is willing to take up the 
cudgels in the hope of capturing that 
promised S2.50. (See last paragraph of 
Truth-seeker's communication). 

Dropping for the time the editorial 
plural, I will give my frank personal 
analysis of the situation. I believe that 
Lewisburg alumni will substantially 
agree to the following diagnosis: 

Every year at Commencement there 
returns a rejuvenated and enthusiastic 
body of alumni. Filled with zeal and 
ideas, some good, some bad, some based 
on knowledge, some on utter ignor- 
ance and misapprehension of condi- 
tions, these alumni talk over the "good 
of the order" on the campus and about 
town, and bring into the annual Alumni 
meeting a definite program warranted 
to bring results. This program is rushed 
through the meeting, resolutions are 
adopted and legislation passed with a 
"hoorah", — and forgotten. 

(Continued on Page Twelve) 
® 

THANKS ! 



The Alumni Ofiice wishes to thank 
Mr. Jesse E. Riley, '14, for a copy of 
the 1914 L'Agenda. It fills one of the 
gaps in our files. 

Professor Wm E. Martin has further 
contributed the files of the Bucknell 
Women's Journal, except for Vol I, No. 
1, of which he has but one copy. The 
Library and the Alumni Office would 
appreciate gifts of this number. 



Dear Rockwell: 

There is undoubtedly an urgent need 
for some way of arousing the Alumni 
of Bucknell to a realization of their 
duties to their Alma Mater. It seems 
to me that we (and that isn't an edi- 
torial We, either) have gone along "let- 
ting George do it". Now all of a sud- 
den we realize that we have been 
slacking, and a few of the faithful have 
been shouldering our burdens. Instead 
of admitting our error and putting our 
shoulders to the wheel, we politely in- 
timate that our "rights" have been 
trespassed upon. First of all, I feel 
that every Alumnus and Alumna must 
be made to feel that they have an act- 
ual — a live interest in their school, and 
that the best way they can show it 
is by making the Alumni Association 
something more than a name. 

A reorganization without the backing 
of the Alumni will be simply getting 
out of one rut into another. We are 
greatly handicapped by the scattering 
of our Alumni, but all these adverse 
conditions must be faced and overcome 
if we are to take our place among the 
active, live institutions of the day. I have 
given this proposition a great deal of 
thought. I only wish I had the time, 
money, and power (by voice or by pen) 
to get to everj' graduate and make him 
see what an injustice he is doing him- 
selt first of all, and his school second- 
arily, by neglecting his lights, privileges 
and duties. 

I believe that a reorganization should 
be about as follows (Please remember 
that these are my personal views only). 
While the Pittsburgh Alumni have wish- 
ed this job on me, it does not neces- 
sarily follow that they will coincide en- 
tirely with my views: 

(1) Ail graduates and matriculates of 
one year or more should be mem- 
bers of the association, also an 
honorary membership could be 
provided for. 

(2) Officers should be a president, 
vice president (first), and several 
honorary vice presidents, a sec- 
retary (who should be the Grad- 
uate Manager of Athletics) and a 
treasurer. 

(3) Provision should be made for 
branch organizations throughout 
the country. It might even be 
found advisable to encourage the 
payment of yearly dues to the Gen- 
eral Association through the local 
branch — or even arrange it in the 
form of a per capita tax. In this 
way, the formation of live local 
organizations could be encourag- 
ed. The bond between the alumni 
and the General Association could 
be made firmer by strong locals, 
closely related to the General As- 
sociation. 

(4) The officers should be elected by 
a written vote, ballots being sent 
to all Alumni in good standing. 

(5) An advisory committee — execu- 
tive council — or whatever you 
would want to call it — should be 
devised to carry on the actual 
work of the Association. It 
could be made up of as many men 



The foOowing poem has been sub- 
mitted by one of Bucknell's oldest and 
most respected graduates for considera- 
tion as an Alma Mater song. It is pub- 
lished with the hope that some of the 
musicians among the Alumni may be 
inspired to find fitting music. The 
Monthly will welcome any contribu- 
tions of this nature. 

"Blue and Orange Over All" 
Sing the glad September morning 

When fair Bucknell took us in, — 
Set us at our own adorning, — 

Strangers all, she made us kin. 
Now enlisted in the service 

Where her royal colors fly 
Though the path be red with danger, 

We will follow till we die. 

At her call we face each duty, — 

Battle till the victory's won, — 
Have our share of joy and beauty, — 

Bright ascends the morning sun. 
Now's the day of brave endeavor, — 

Golden hours and dreams a-wing, — 
Stay! O happy day forever! 

Bucknell, 'tis of thee we sing! 

Sound her praises! Swell the echo! 

Send the chorus to the sky! 
Where 'tis duty, where 'tis danger. 

Keep her colors floating high. 
Be a hero in her story! 

Loyal, true, whate'er the call! 
Add new luster to her glory! 

"Blue and Orange over all! " 
Nov. 24, 1920 — "BuckneU Grad". 

® 

BUCKNELL OF TODAY 



Because of illness on the part of one 
of the contributors, the article planned 
for this issue, in the Bucknell of Today 
series, will not appear until February. 



as were needed to represent the 
different elements, and at the 
same time not be unwieldy. For 
instance: each organized Buck- 
nell Alumni Club should be al- 
lowed one member on this com- 
mittee and enough men could he 
chosen as delegates-at-large to 
make up a fair-sized committee. 
In this way, we would again be 
encouraging the formation of 
Bucknell Clubs, and at the same 
time, by having Delegates-at- 
large, could take care of the men 
who have shown an interest and 
are conversant with the affairs of 
the University. (By this I mean 
that Lewisburg and the im- 
mediate environs of the campus 
should have a preponderance on 
such a Committee. I believe this 
is no more than fair and is sure 
to appeal as reasonable to every 
one). The Advisory Council could 
then delegate committees to 
handle their different affairs and 
to meet with similar committees 
from the undergraduate body, 
and the Faculty. For instance, 
the Athletic Council could be 
made up of student representa- 
tives, faculty representatives, the 
Alumni Council's Committee on 
Athletics, representatives from the 
(Continued on Page Twelve) 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



Dr. Adoniram Judson Rowland— An Appreciation 

By William E. Martin 



ADONIRAM JUDSON ROWLAND was born at Val- 
ley Forge, Pa., February 9, 1840, the son of Samuel 
Norton and Susanna Suplee-Rowland. At ten he 
was reading RolUn's History and Milton's Paradise 
Lost. He was educated in the public schools, and in 
"Washington Hall" at Trappe, Pa. At seventeen he was 
teaching sixty pupils,' many older than their teacher; while 
keeping up his own studies, preparatory to college. He en- 
tered the Sophomore class at Lewisburg early in 1859. To 
continue his self-support, he supplied the pulpit of the Clin- 
ton Baptist Church, Montgomery. 

His classmates included Messrs. Baldbridge, Beck, Con- 
rad, Jones, Miller, Nesbit, Tucker and Walker. His school- 
mates included Drs. Eaches, Gill, Munro, Shaw-Loo, Spencer, 
and Weaver, who survive him; and Drs. Case, Clapp, Garner, 
and Hellings; with Messrs Leas and Wolfe, who have pre- 
ceded him to rest. 

His teachers were President Loomis, and Professors Bliss, 
Curtis, James, and Tustin. These names 
and the years 1860-1862 will suggest the at- 
mosphere in which student Rowland spent 
three earnest, serious years, — winning high- 
est rank in scholarship, and a high degree 
in friendship. Having raised a company 
of volunteers for the nine months' service 
he was appointed chaplain of the 175th 
Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, and 
served until July, 1863. He was ordained 
to the gospel ministry in October, 1862, 
So the suggestion of his birthplace kind- 
led a patriotism that characterized his en- 
tire life. 

While stationed at Newbern, N. C, he 
ministered to the negro population, and 
encouraged their efforts to secure the ele- 
ments of education. This was pioneer ser- 
vice of the kind. 

In the Autumn of 1863 he entered 
Rochester Theological Seminary, and was 
graduated with the class of 1866. On May 
31, 1865, he was married to Miss Harriet 
E. Frick, of East Coventry, Chester Co., 
Pa. 

Here his teachers were Drs. Hotchkiss, 
Kendrick, Northrup and Robinson; among 
his classmates were Drs. Duncan, Good- 
speed, and Messrs. Leas and Porter. Other 
classmen of his day were Drs. Behrends, 
Elder, Hellings, Hoyt, Jones, Lisk, More- 
house, Gen'l Morgan, Drs. Sage, Stevens, 
and Stott. 

His first pastorate at Mount Auburn, 
Cincinnati, Ohio, 1866-68, led to his accept- 
ance of the principalship of the "Mount Auburn Seminary", 
1868-70, in which he developed the interest in education so 
dominant in his long career. 

An all too brief pastorate in the First Church, Pitts- 
burgh, 1870-72, before the completion of their main build- 
ing, on Fourth street, led on to the twelve happy and success- 
ful years with the Tenth Church, Philadelphia, 1872-84, and 
the distinguished FrankUn Square pastorate in Baltimore, 
Md., 1884-1895. 

His Alma Mater early claimed his allegiance and his 
active service: from 1872-82 as Curator, and 1882 to' 1920, as 
Trustee, and Secretary of the Trustees. As a Curator, he 
encouraged the scholastic efforts of his college, by his own 
scholarly growth, and by his experience of educational pro- 
gress in larger communities. This he placed at the service of 
his college in helpful ways. As curator he served his ap- 
prenticeship to the greast tasks of his mature, life; preeminent- 
ly to his trusteeship of thirty-eight years for Bucknell Uni- 
versity. Here he developed the talent of the good counsellor, 
of the faithful scribe, of the wise administrator of interests 
beyond the market or the counting-house. 

And here his rewards were in kind: the dividends yield- 
ing trained servants of the Kingdom of Heaven; skilled 
practitioners of the healing art; able defenders of human 




rights; devoted missionaries of the Cross; faithful guides in 
the education of youth. 

To this service Dr. Rowland devoted his mature judg- 
ment and ripened scholarship; his hopeful spirit and tactful 
address. He had a high estimate of the mission of education 
in the Republic, and in the Kingdom of Heaven, 

Those who remember his early career testify to the earnest- 
ness and genuineness of his character, and to his ability to 
gain and hold attention to his cause. He had a voice of sing- 
ular resonance; a distinct utterance, a modulation of tone 
and directness of manner, convincing beyond the appeal of 
art. Urbanity and dignity characterized all his association 
with his fellows, and revealed the inner calm of thought and 
deliberation. We associate such "self-reverence, self-knowl- 
edge, self-control", with the bench or the diplomatic circle. 
Any who, on slight acquaintance, misjudged his reserve as in- 
difference, needed only to know him better. The heavy 
burdens of the passing years did not crush his hopeful spirit, 
nor cause him to despair of progress. Poli- 
cies, like all expression, may change; but 
principles stand fast, and these gave him 
both solace and hope. 

Dr Rowland was a great executive, be- 
cause he trusted the motives of his as- 
sociates, appreciated their common en- 
deavors, — sharing the praise, as he shared 
the toil. Sincere and genuine in his own 
purposes, he gave fullest credit for the 
like traits in others. This is the touch- 
stone of all managerial success, — when 
confidence begets confidence, and virtue 
sheds its light into other lives. 

It is given to some men to initiate poli- 
cies and institutions; others contribute 
energy to workers, or inspire hope in the 
despondent; yet others overturn and re- 
create failing ventures. Dr. Rowland was 
more than a conserver of mature institu- 
tions: he was the balance-wheel of a 
mighty engine, — ^storing its momentum, 
distributing its energy, stabilizing its ef- 
ficiency. He utilized experience without 
suffering its dictation: he enjoyed present 
activity without resting satisfied with its 
fruits. Like his Master, he saw the white 
fields of the future, and yearned for the 
coming laborers. As in his early manhood, 
he reacted to the suggestions of his birth- 
place, in patriotic loyalty to the nation 
for which Washington had suffered at Val- 
ley Forge ; so, in his prime, he responded 
to the suggestions of his name; always 
hearing and heeding the monition to ser- 
so characteristic of Adoniram Judson. 

From the inception of the University movement in the 
early Forties, the relations between the "American Baptist 
Publication Society" and the "Bucknell University" were 
most intimate and helpful. The same leaders directed both; 
the same benefactors sustained them; the same constituency 
patronized them; the same distinguished secretaries wrought 
heroically for both institutions. Shadrach, Griffith, Row- 
land,— a devoted trio,— suggesting those earlier three friends 
of Jesus, and friends of men. The annals of three-quarters of 
a century preserve a fellowship of worthiest men and women, 
in behalf of human welfare. The interactions of this group 
of Christian people disclose a force transcending human 
selfishness; and promising the ideal association of human 
society, under the supreme motive of good-will. 

Dr. Rowland shared in the effects of the unrest in edu- 
cational policy, which wrote "change" upon the curricula of 
American colleges between 1880 and 1920. Schooled in the 
classical tradition, he valued the permanent elements of art 
and science as educational material. Convinced of the im- 
perishable worth of the literature of religion as fundamental 
in higher education, he could not surrender such confidence 
to the clamor of the new and the untried. The problem to his 
(Continued on Page Seven) 



A. J. Rowland, D.D., LL.D. 



vice and sacrifice 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



Alumni Organizations 



Chicagoans Entertain 

President Hunt 



On Friday evening, December 3rd, in 
the Steven's Restaurant, Chicago, the 
Bucknell Alumni of this district had 
another opportunity of eating together 
and talking over the good old days in 
college. 

There are fifty-one of us in this great 
Middle West District, and only about 
twenty-five in the immediate Chicago 
District. Eighteen of us managed to be 
present for the Great Time. 

It was indeed a real joy to meet Dr. 
Hunt and to hear him tell of the wonder- 
ful happenings back at the dear old col- 
lege on the hill. We were exceedingly 
delighted to hear of the excellent plans 
for the future of our Alma Mater. 

But we were all pleased to come to 
know Dr. Hunt personally and to as- 
sure him of our hearty welcome as 
President of our University. In the 
course of his remarks he also told us of 
his recent trip into the war zone in 
Europe and informed us of the great 
human need over there. 

At the close of Dr. Hunt's address 
each one present was given an oppor- 
tunity to stand up and give his name, 
class numeral, and present occupation. 
We were agreeably surprised to find 
present a street car official, an engi- 
neer, salesman, assistant foreman, school 
teachers, business manager, house wives, 
and a preacher. Many present announc- 
ed the fact that they are preparing quite 
a few members for the Freshman Class 
at BuckneU in 1938. 

After giving our happiest farewell 
wishes to Dr. Hunt and sending with 
him our hearty greetings to other 
Alumni Associations, we adjourned un- 
til the last Monday in March. 

® 

Pittsburgh Club Meets 



The most interesting meeting of the 
Pittsburgh Alumni that has been held 
recently was on December 28th at the 
Chamber of Commerce. Our guests 
were Rev. A. B. Bowser, class of '88, and 
his son, A. C. Bowser, who needs no in- 
troduction. We were also delighted to 
have with us Francis Gibson, 1923, and 
Ellis Deifenbach, 1924, both of whom 
responded to the call of President Grif- 
fiths for a speech. 

At this meeting, R. G. Bostwick, Esq., 
reported that great progress was made 
at the December meeting of the Board 
of Trustees toward developing plans for 
expansion of Bucknell. 

® ■ 

Hazleton Plans 



The Hazleton Alumni Club is plan- 
ning a luncheon in the near future, at 
which it hopes to have President Hunt 
as guest of honor. 



Bucknell Alumnae Club Program 

The Bucknell Alumnae Club of 
Philadelphia and vicinity, is one of the 
largest and most active of the Alumnae 
Clubs in Philadelphia. It is affiliated 
with the Association of Collegiate Alum- 
nae, and the CoUege Club. The num- 
ber of members is well over a hundred. 
The Club wishes to assure all recent 
graduates of a warm welcome. Mrs. A. 
V. Wise, of Ashbourne, Pa., is chairman 
of the Entrance Committee, and will 
be very glad to receive the names of 
any who are eligible. 

There are three stated meetings a year 
which are held at the College Club, 1300 
Spruce street. In the spring and fall a 
tea is given and the first Saturday in 
February is the date of the Annual 
Luncheon. Visiting Alumnae will be 
most welcome at this luncheon if they 
notify the chairman of the Entertain- 
ment Committee, Mrs. S. C. Bolton, 
4703 Leiper street, Frankford, Phila- 
delphia. The price of the luncheon will 
probably be $1.50. The club also co- 
operates with the Philadelphia Alumni 
Club in a joint dinner, usually held at 
the Bellevue-Stratford Hotel. After a 
short business session the meetings are 
turned over to Miss Inez Olds, chair- 
man of the Program Committee, who 
has been most fortunate in securing 
well known speakers to address the 
club. This part of the program is al- 
ways followed by a social half hour. 

The club maintains a scholarship at 
Bucknell and a number of young women 
have been aided by the generosity of the 
club and of individual members. 

One of the most important recent ac- 
tivities of the club has been the work 
of the committee of Co-operation of 
which Mrs. Romain Hassrick is the 
chairman. This committee makes 
recommendations which concern the 
women at Bucknell, directly to the 
Board of Trustees. The club was grati- 
fied to learn through Mrs. Hassrick's re- 
port at the October meeting that many 
of the recommendations of her commit- 
tee have been already carried out. 

The Bucknell Alumnae of Philadel- 
phia wish to see the women of Buck- 
nell represented upon the Board of 
Trustees, and at a recent meeting urged 
the Board of Trustees to consider nam- 
ing one or more of the following mem- 
bers of the club: Mrs. Geo. S. Matlack, 
Miss Emma Bolenius, and Mrs. J. Bird 
Moyer. 

Many members of the club regret that 
Bucknell women are not eligible to 
membership in the Association of Col- 
legiate Alumnae, since that organization 
holds that the interests of women are 
not sufficiently cared for by colleges 
where women are not members of the 
Board of Trustees, and are not repre- 
sented on the Faculty in sufficient num- 
bers to show that women are not dis- 
criminated against. 

The Philadelphia Club will be glad 
to have the other Alumnae Clubs join 
it in urging the appointment of a 
woman trustee. 



Baltimore Bucknellians 

About to Organize 



It is planned in the near future to 
organize a Baltimore Bucknell Club. All 
alumni in that vicinity are urged to get 
into touch with Mr. Andrew E. Sable, 
% Baltimore Polytechnic Institute, at 
once. 



-S>- 



Riemer Raps Colleges 

Dr. G. C. L. Riemer, '95, of the State 
Department of Public Instruction, 
speaking before the State Education 
Association at Harrisburg on Decem- 
ber 26, criticised the colleges for their 
bad influence on the high schools, con- 
trolling as they do, by their entrance 
credits system the high school program 
of studies. 

"It is absolutely necessary to have a 
flexible program of studies in the sec- 
ondary schools", he said, "for that 
should be the period of exploration 
when the student decides on his or her 
life work. Under the present system of 
college control of credits it is impossible 
to give that chance to the students. 
The colleges have rigidly laid down the 
law as to what shall and shall not be 
studied. If they want Latin and higher 
mathematics and other similar studies, 
they force the children to take them by 
refusing a chance to get to college with- 
out the credits for that work. This 
hampers the real work of the schools 
and ties their courses so as to leave no 
freedom of choice either to the child 
or the public school authorities". 



-®- 



Dr. Moore, Jersey Assemblyman 

A. Lincoln Moore, D.D., '91, while 
serving as Chaplain of the 112th Engi- 
neers, was taken ill with typhoid fever 
and invalided. After treatment at the 
Walter Reed Military Hospital in Wash- 
ington, he retired to his summer home 
"Crestmoore" at Hampton, N. J. Since 
regaining his health he has been writ- 
ing, lecturing and preaching. At the 
recent election he was elected a mem- 
ber of the Legislature on the Republi- 
can ticket the first Republican As- 
semblyman ever elected in the history 
of Hunterdon County. 

® 

Dr. Bromley's Church Celebrates 



The Great Bethel Baptist Church, of 
Uniontown, of which Dr. J. S. Bromley, 
honorary alumnus of Bucknell, and 
father of Rev. C. L. Bromley, 
'09, of China, and Miss Thirza Bromley, 
'20, celebrated its one hundred fiftieth 
anniversary this fall. 

Among the speakers were President 
Emory W. Hunt, "Charley" Bromley, 
the Rev. J. Earle Edwards, '10, of Con- 
nellsville, and Dr. Leroy Stephens, '68, 
of Lewisburg. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



About the Hill 



-•"•••••••"••••••••H ••••( 



Western Trip of Glee 

• Club Great Success 

The Western tour of the Glee Club 
during the Thanksgiving recess in- 
augurated the season with a series of 
successful concerts. 

The first stop was at Harrisburg, No- 
vember 24, where the club sang in the 
Harrisburg Technical High School, 
under the auspices of the Tabernacle 
Baptist Church, to whose pastor, the 
Rev. Mr. Wickes, great credit is due 
for working up an appreciative crowd 
on short notice. 

At HoUidaysburg the Rev. Mr. Huff 
and his people entertained with royal 
Thanksgiving dinners at the various 
homes, and where Thanksgiving cheer 
and enthusiasm greeted the club in the 
High School auditorium, and at the 
union Thanksgiving service at which it 
appeared. 

Rudolph Peterson, '15, of Cresson, 
had charge of the concert at that place 
on November 26, and made it a great 
success, receiving the club with true 
Bucknell spirit. 

At Jeanette, the following evening, 
the Rev. Reinhold Stolz, ex-'06, brother 
of Director Paul G. Stolz, gave a party 
and a luncheon in honor of the club. 

The Rev. Mr. Hallowell and a goodly 
crowd of alumni received the wayfar- 
ers with a welcome that warmed their 
souls, and the big Methodist Church 
was jammed at the concert on Saturday 
night. The club remained until Sun- 
day afternoon in Vandergrift, individu- 
al members appearing in the various 
churches. 

Sunday afternoon the trip was made 
to Connellsville, where the party ar- 
rived just in time to take part in the 
evening service of the Baptist Church. 
The Rev. J. Earle Edwards, '10, had a 
full program planned, including a con- 
cert in the high school Monday morn- 
ing, a luncheon at the Y. M. C. A., an 
afternoon concert at Dunbar Township 
High School, luncheon there given by 
the senior class, and a visit to the coal 
mines; and an evening concert in Con- 
nellsville, where an audience of a thous- 
and people gave a hearty reception to 
the program rendered. 

At Pittsburgh the next day the Pitts- 
burgh Alumni Club received the boys 
at the station and escorted them to the 
Americus Republican Club, where a fine 
luncheon was served in their honor, 
with great enthusiasm prevailing. 
Thence they were conducted to the 
Schenley High School, where, under the 
sponsorship of Dr. Coit R. Hoechst, '07, 
they appeared before two thousaiid stu- 
dents. The evening concert was given 
before a crowd including a large num- 
ber of alumni and was enthusiastically 
received. The club was introduced by 
Roy G. Bostwick, '05. 

The boys are still talking about the 
gala day in Pittsburgh and are loud in 
their praises of the Pittsburgh Alumni 
Club as live and wide-awake. 

Linesville was visited the next day, 
(Continued on Page Seven) 



Riley, '14, on Athletic 

Appeal Board 

Jesse E. Riley, '14, who is principal of 
schools at New Martinsville, W. Va., 
was recently elected Vice-President of 
the West Virginia High School Athletic 
Association. The president, vice-presi- 
dent, and secretary compose a Board 
of Appeals whose work is to handle 
the athletic situation throughout the 
state, fostering clean athletics. 

Since the West Virginia association is 
considered one of the best in the 
country, this election is a real honor. 



Advisory Committee Enlarged 

The Board of Trustees at its annual 
meeting enlarged the alumni represen- 
tation on the Athletic Advisory Board 
by adding to it Edward M. Green, ex-'95, 
of Mt. Union, Judge J. Warren Davis, 
'96, of Trenton; Rush Kress, '00, of New 
York; Dr. A. R. Garner, '99, George 
Cockill, '05, of Steelton, Dr. Maurice F. 
Goldsmith, '06, of Pittsburgh; W. Stew- 
art Duncan, '08, of Duncannon, Henry 
L. Fonda, '18, of Philadelphia. 

The old members are Professor E. M. 
Heim, '93, Professor B. W. Griffith, '99, 
F. Blair Jaekel, '03, Clarence A. Wey- 
mouth, '00, R. W. Thompson, '04, P. G. 
Smith, '05, and President Emory W. 
Hunt. 

The enlarged committee will meet in 
January to formulate plans for reorgani- 
zation. 

® 



A Reminiscence 



By Dr. J. W. WeddeU 
The faces of the men in the foot- 
ball team of 1895 call back to me the 
wonderful days of the college revival at 
Bucknell that year. Forty students 
came forward in college chapel at the 
close of that happy series of meetings 
and gave Dr. Harris, Dr. Judd and my- 
self their hand for the Master. It was 
a time to be remembered into eternity. 
I recall especially Capt. Bunnell of the 
team who led his men to the front, 
and Y. M. C. A. Secretary Collins, who 
was a leading spirit in the hearty 
roundup of the students. 

® 

R. J. Parmenter is in the office of the 
designing engineer of the Public Ser- 
vice Co., of Northern Illinois. His 
home is at 4318 Berkely avenue, Chi- 
cago, 111. 

'13 — W. C. Hulley, Jr., is teaching 
mathematics at Knoxville Union High 
School, Pittsburgh. 

The Rev. Raymond G. Pierson is en- 
tering on the iifth year of his pastor- 
ate at Janesville, Wis. He uses movies 
with great success in his work. He uses 
them Friday evenings and has a crowd 
of from five to six hundred, and uses 
them also at Sunday evening service. 
Mr. Pierson has five sons and a 
daughter. 



HILL AND BURG 



The library is rejoicing in a recent 
accession of some three hundred vol- 
umes representing the publications of 
the Carnegie Institution of Washing- 
ton. The collection includes works of 
rare value in many fields. It was ob- 
tained by the efforts of Professor Wm. 
E. Martin and Assistant Professer H. 
S. Everett. 

* « « 

The faculty is now an affiliated as- 
sociation of the National Education As- 
sociation, having voted recently to join 
that body. 

* * ft 

Dr. Frank Smith, of Elizabeth, N. J., 
the Rev. Z. Brown, of India, and Mr. 
Miller, State Y. M. C. A. Secretary, 
spoke at chapel during December. 

* -:■:- ft 

Graduate Manager C. E. Glass, and 
Professors E. M. Heim and B. W. Grif- 
fith attended the annual meeting of the 
Middle Atlantic States Collegiate Ath- 
letic Association at Philadelphia, De- 
cember 17. 

In response to a student petition, the 
faculty extended the Christmas recess 
four days. 

Many Bucknellians with their families 
spent the holidays with friends and 
relatives in Lewisburg. Among them 
were Herbert F. Harris, '96; James P. 
Harris, '12, and Walter Harris, '14, Ed- 
ward Parke, '12; Herbert C. Grice, '18; 
Professor Browne Martin, '97; Malcolm 
Musser, '18; Dr. William Leiser, 3rd, '09; 
Mrs. H. V. Fisher, Inst., '12; Baker 
Bernhardt, '13; Miller A. Johnson, '20; 
A. E. Sable, '11; Roger Edwards, '04; 
Dr. Slifer Walls, '03; JosephW. Hender- 
son, '08. 

ft ft ft 

Mrs. Genevieve Shutterly Miller, of 
Monessen, spent some time with Mr. 
and Mrs. G. Barron Miller, in Decem- 
ber. 

ft ft ft 

Mr. John K. Kremer, for forty-two 
years cashier of the Union National 
Bank, and one of Lewisburg's oldest 
residents, who will be remembered by 
many of the alumni, passed away De- 
cember 23. 

® 

Glee Club's Northern Trip 



The second Glee Club trip through 
Northern Pennsylvania and New York, 
extended from December 27 to Janu- 
ary 5, including concerts at Canton, 
Troy, Knoxville, Wel'sboro, Couders- 
port. Port Allegany, Kane, Bradford, 
Renovo. A full report will be given in 
the next issue. 

® 

Miss Adelaide W. Guthrie, ex-'Ol, is 
in editorial work with the Y. M. C. A. 
overseas and may be addressed Int. 
Com. Y. M. C. A., 46 Rue de Provence, 
Paris, France. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



'•••••• ••^•••^•••••-•^•••••••HaHaK»M«»»*.«K«H««| 



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In the Public Eye 



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— •-••••••••••-•»t»*- 



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General Bliss Pleads 

For Disarmament 



T. E. Moore, '14, Has 

Brilliant Record 



A New Trustee 



"Major General Tasker H. Bliss open 
ed the Public Ledger forum on the 
Peace Conference in the foyer of the 
Academy of Music last night, giving the 
first of a series of fifteen talks which 
will constitute the story of "What 
rea'-ly Happened in Paris". General 
Bliss was military representative of the 
United States on the Supreme War 
Council and commissioner plenipoten- 
tiary on the American Peace Commis- 
sion. 

"One of the most representative audi- 
ences that ever gathered in Philadelphia 




Major Gen. Tasker H. Bliss 

filled every seat in the beautifully reno- 
vated foyer which, with its tall mirrors, 
appropriately resembled the famous 
"Salon des Glaces" at Versailles, where 
the Treaty of Peace was signed. 

"The topic of General Bliss' talk was 
"The Limitation to Armaments". One 
of the salient features of the general's 
address was a declaration that there 
can be no enduring and effective asso- 
ciation of the nations for the mainte- 
nance of peace so long as those nations 
are armed to the teeth solely against 
each other. He added that neither can 
there be a successful court of arbitra- 
tion so long as the present miltary sys- 
tem exist, since, with preparedness such 
as is now in vogue, any faithless nation 
always will be able to break agreements 
and defy the other nations. 

"In the beginning of his talk. General 
Bliss asserted that the making of peace 
with the Central Powers was not the 
real problem confronting the Peace 
Conference. Rather, he said, was it the 
peace of the entire world. And such a 
peace, he went on to say, could not be 
established without limiting the arma- 
ment of all nations to a certain mini- 
( Continued on Page Twelve! 



Among the Bucknellians to make a 
brilliant record in the World War was 
Thomas E. Moore, '14. Enlisting Au- 
gust 27, 1917, he was commissioned sec- 
ond lieutenant of Field Artillery No- 
vember 25, and sailed for France in 
December. 

After a brief training in Artillery 
School in France he was attached to 
the 32nd Division and went through 
three major operations. 

He was gassed October 25, 1918, and 
invalided home in February, receiving 
his discharge at Ft. Riley, Kansas, 
March 13, 1919. 

While serving with the French army 
he was awarded the French Croix de 
Guerre. 

Returning home he engaged in the 
cattle business. On March 1, 1920, he 
was appointed County Surveyor. This 
fall he was nominated on the Republi- 
can ticket for state representative from 
Kiowa County, and elected. 



-«- 



Mathewson Still Improving 

The following dispatch to the Phila- 
delphia North American will cheer 
many a'umni who are anxious about 
"Christy's" condition. 

Saranac Lake, N. Y., Dec. 22. — Far 
from abandoning all hope for the re- 
covery of Christy Mathewson, former 
big league ball star, now under treat- 
ment for tuberculosis here, his attend- 
ing physician, Dr. E. N. Packard, de- 
clared that both "Big Six" and himself 
entertained high hopes for the twirler's 
ultimate recovery. 

And this in spite of the fact that 
Mathewson as far as usage is concerned, 
has but one lung left. The collapse of 
the other, according to Doctor Packard, 
a former Syracuse University star oars- 
man, gave Mathewson needed relief in- 
stead of adding to his difficulty. 

Doctor Packard said: "Mathewson 
for a time was in serious condition. I 
suppose that it was then that some one 
without authority said that he was dy- 
ing. I am his private physican, and I 
never said so. Matty is doing well, and 
you know what I mean when I say this. 

"I cannot give out a complete diag- 
nosis of his condition, not that I am not 
able to, but that it is not policy to. Be- 
lieve me, there is no other person in 
the world who would reioice any more 
than me to say that Mathewson was 
completely recovered. 

"Reports published before were made 
on guesses. I am glad to tell the truth. 
And what I think ful'y covers his condi- 
tion is, Mathewson is doing as well as 
can be expected under the circum- 
stances. He hopes for his ultimate re- 
covery, and so do I". 

Inquiries from Lewisliurg relatives 
developed the fact that he recently sat 
up to eat dinner for the first time since 
August, and that his family is much en- 
couraged at his improved condition. 



From an alumnus well acquainted 
with Mr. Vaughan, the Monthly obtains 
the following sketch of this new 
Trustee. 

Mr. Vaughan was born in Maine in 
1867. He was educated in the Peabody, 
Mass., Grammar School and at Phillips 
Academy, Andover, Mass. In the 
Vaughan Machine Co., at Peabody, 
Mass., he developed the largest leather 
working machine business in the world. 




Charles P. Vaughan 

In 1901 he sold out, and the following 
year bought into Dungan, Hood & Co., 
of which he and his brother, Ira 
Vaughan, are sole owners. 

For ten years he was in the Massa- 
chusetts Voluntary Militia, retiring 
with the rank of captain. 

During the war Mr. Vaughan render- 
ed invaluable service. He gave un- 
sparingly of his time to the Liberty 
Loan campaigns, being chairman of In- 
dustrial Group 19, whose subscriptions 
to the various loans totaled approxi- 
mately twenty million dollars. 

At the request of the government he 
also organized the Tanners' Council of 
the United States, which organized the 
leather distribution to military and 
civilian needs. Of this organization he 
is at present Vice-president. 

His efforts differ from those of most 
men, who during the war were roused 
to super-patriotism, in that in %var and 
peace and unceasingly he %vorks with 
tireless energy for the development of 
Philadelphia, the State of Pennsylvania 
and the Federal Government. 

He has been active in the Philadel- 
phia Chamber of Commerce, of which 
(Continued on Page Twelve) 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



Dr. Brawley Retires 



Robey a Trustee 



From the December issue of "The 
Crisis" we clip the following apprecia- 
tion of Dr. Brawley, 75; 

Dr. E. M. Brawley has retired from 
the pulpit of the White Rock Baptist 
Church, Durham, N. C, after eight 
years' service. During this time the 
debt on the church has been reduced 
from $20,000 to $7,000, all current expen- 
ses have been met and a parsonage has 
been purchased. The congregation pre- 
sented Dr. Brawley with a silver loving 
cup. 

Dr. Brawley was born in 1851 in 
Charleston, N. C. He was the first stu- 
dent in the School of Theology at How- 
ard University. - In 1875 he was gradu- 
ated from Bucknell University. Dr. 
Brawley has organized churches, Sun- 
Schools and conventions throughout the 
South, and is the author of a "Com- 
mentary on Mark", a text-book on 
evan<3;e'ism, a number of tracts and 
pamphlets, and editor of "The Evangel", 
a monthly pamphlet. He was president 
of Selma University for four years and 
in 190S founded Morris College at Sum- 
ter, S. C. The well-known Benjamin G. 
Brawley, author and historian, is his 
son. 

® 

Western Trip of Glee 

Club Great Success 



Louis W. Robe}% who was elected a 
member of the Board of Trustees at its 
last meeting, needs no introduction to 



(Continued from Page Five) 

and this little town of a thousand sent 
out an audience of five hundred to 
greet the Bucknellians. 

Another live alumnus, the Rev. H. 
G. Weston Smith, '13, had charge of 
the Greensville date, which included a 
morning concert at the High School, a 
luncheon at the Baptist Church, and an 
evening concert featured by the presen- 
tation of a bouquet to "Si" Haus by 
Andy Mathieson, '20, a regular salad 
it was, too. "Si" called on Andy later 
to lead a "Bucknell-el-el" which the 
club gave with spirit. 

The last stop was at Kittanning, 
under the auspices of the Rev. Mr. 
Dwyer and the Baptist Church. Two 
concerts were given here. At the social 
hour following the evening concert, Mrs. 
F. G. Bowser and Mrs. Winters, mother 
and sister of Arda Bowser were present. 

The Monthly wishes it had space to 
include a few of the numerous flattering 
press notices that followed the apear- 
ances of the club. President Hunt also 
commented recently on the many let- 
ters and telegrams he had received, 
praising not only the musical ability 
but the character and general bearing 
of the club on the trip. 

® ^ 

Seventy-Fifth Anniver- 
sary to Be Celebrated 

A committee appointed by the Board 
of Trustees to make plans for the cele- 
bration of the seventy-fifth anniver- 
sary of the founding of the university 
is at work on a program for Commence- 
ment which shall fittingly mark this 
mile stone in the life of the institution. 

Director Ernest L. Tustin, '84, who 
is chairman of this committee, expects 
soon to have a definite announcement to 
make. 




Louis W. Robey, '04 

the majority of the younger alumni. 

In college he was a member of the 
Demosthenean Club and active in many 
college interests. He took his degree 
summa cum laude in 1904. During the 
following years he taught in Perkiomen 
Seminary and Bucknell Academy. He 
entered the University of Pennsylvania 
Law School in 1906, and was gradu- 
ated as an honor man in 1909. He en- 
tered the law offices of George Whar- 
ton Pepper and remained there until 
1914, when he entered the firm of 
Taylor and Robey. 

Besides building up an extensive law 
practice, he has in the last few years 
become prominent in the business and 
financial world of Philadelphia, being 
a director in the Richards Mfg. Co., the 
Rexim Co., and others. President of 
the Overbrook Bank, and President of 
the newly organized Commercial Ad- 
vance Corporation. 

He is also an active educator. After 
teaching for some time in University 
of Pennsylvania Law School, he was 
made head of the department of Real 
Estate Law at Temple University, a 
position which he still holds. 

He is author of a text-book, "Out- 
lines of Real Estate Law and Practice", 
which is said to be unequaled in its 
field. 

® 

Dr. Rowland— An Appreciation 

(Continued from Page Three) 

mind, was not the new versus the old: but 
the abiding versus the transient. Yet he 
acquiesced in every extension of op- 
portunity to the practical subjects. 
This was not to yield to a rash at- 
tack upon sound pedagogical policy; 
but to extend the training of the col- 
lege to a new range of applicants. The 
fixed curriculum, to him, seemed ex- 
clusive, and therefore, incompatible 
with American necessities and spirit. In 
the Christian College, the emphasis is 
not so much upon the subjects taught. 



as upon the nature of the learner, and 
the spirit of the instruction. The at- 
mosphere of education is more import- 
ant than its soil. 

As to all thoughful trustees, the drift 
of American collegiate practice was to 
him matter of great concern. True to 
liis life-long confidence in the Wisdom 
that guides our high endeavors, he 
hoped for the direction of all educa- 
iional effort towards the establishment 
<if the Kingdom of Heaven. Policies 
may respond to passing demand: the 
-.pirit will find the eternal. The de- 
velopment of human character must 
iver render possible man's highest ef- 
ficiency. In the heights above change. 
Dr. Rowland's spirit, found hope and 
assurance of progress. To such men 
change brings no defeat, but a new turn 
in the ascending road! 

Ur. Rowland possessed the business 
instinct in high degree. He could anti- 
cipate success, and then patiently work 
to deserve it. He saw no reason for 
slipshod methods in "the King's busi- 
ness". If common sense could be con- 
secrated to high purpose, so could busi- 
ness methods be harnessed to the tasks 
of the Kingdom. The growth of the 
great society he directed remains his 
monument, more enduring than bronze. 
That he was not permitted to see the 
full fruition of his plans, links him with 
all leaders. His reach was greater than 
his grasp. That he should suffer from 
the growing pains of progress was in- 
evitable. His predecessors had been 
acquainted with grief, even as their 
Lord. But he was, like Him he served, 
magnanimous, — anxious about the suc- 
cess of the great work, rather than 
about his share in the glory. This is 
the victory of faith; to see the outcome, 
and be satisfied. 

When the spirit has been dedicated 
to service, place and time become sec- 
ondary. Yet there was a singular unity 
and progression in the life and work of 
Dr. Rowland. Diversity of gifts min- 
istered to this unity. Pastor, teacher, 
editor, secretary, trustee, — were all links 
in a beautiful chain. After thirty years 
in the pulpit, he might have planned 
rest for the coming years: but, in- 
stead, he seemed to have had a vision 
of his Master with the little child in the 
circle of disciples. 

Then began his most far-reaching 
work. Then sprang to light new capa- 
cities of service, new ambitions for com- 
ing generations. The child was and is 
the problem of Christianity, the hope 
of democracy. LIpon his nurture and 
training depends the future. For his 
instruction the Sunday School exists; 
but it calls for a ten-fold emphasis! 
The Press, the printed word, the col- 
porteur, the evangelist to the children 
in the waste places, must be multiplied 
where population is increasing by leaps 
and bounds. The educational program 
of the churches, starting with the cradle, 
must inc'ude the fullness of the years! 

Then the business initiative in Dr. 
Rowland answered the summons of his 
heart and the call of his generation. It 
seemed we had not previously known 
him: he renewed his youth, and entered 
upon a new career. Yet there was no 
chasm between the earlier task and the 
new: simply a normal development. To 
his latest dav, he cherished the highest 
esteem for the ministry. At the me- 
morial services for Professor Ayres, of 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



Dr. Rowland— An Appreciation 

(Continued from Page Seven) 

Crozer Seminary, the octogenarian vied 
with the theological student in tribute 
to the man he had known as pastor, 
before he was called to the professor's 
chair. 

So may the church keep her eternal 
youth, by cherishing her Lord's enthusi- 
asm for little children. Thus, in Dr. 
Rowland's experience, the first things 
became the last: and who shall say they 
did not crown the whole? For to his 
mind, education is a process, not an 
event; a life-long experience, rather 
than a youthful history; life ever re- 
newed, in order to the fullness of life; 
a vast spiral, ever ascending in wider 
circles, until it is lost in the blue. 

Only a mile of cinema-film could do 
justice to the story of our Publication 
Society, on its material side. Tlte local- 
ity of a spiritual work grips the affec- 
tions, even as it visualizes the unseen 
reality. Who, that remembers No. 530 
Arch street, Philadelphia, and the group 
of men and women who gathered there 
in sympathetic interest, can ever forget 
the sense of achievement, the pres- 
ence of a nation-wide task, the assur- 
ance of the far off fruitage of this 
modest vine! But the expansion of the 
enterprise exceeded any expectation of 
the modest toilers. 

We could scarcely believe the vision 
of 1420 Chestnut street real. It astonish- 
ed its most sanguine supporters. Here 
architect and decorator conspired with 
Secretary Griffith and his loyal board, 
to make the plant worthy of the work 
it housed. The reaction of the build- 
ing and its contents upon the spirit 
of the workers was inspiring. How the 
denomination must have thrilled with 
joy, could it have realized all that these 
headquarters meant to the promoters! 
Yet it was a perishable shrine of an im- 
perishable work; and it was not proof 
against the fire demon! In the pres- 
ence of the smoking ruins, the wreck 
of long cherished hopes, our Mr. Great- 
heart must needs become our Mr. Stout- 
heart! But here our cinema-film would 
fail of the reality, unless the greatest 
living actors could impersonate a score 
of Mr. Stouthearts! their conferences, 
their plans, and their prayers. For 
these were men of faith and vision, 
men of enterprize, and yet men of 
humble dependence upon God. But the 
center of the group, the champion of 
their cause, was our new secretary. Dr. 
Rowland, the inspirer of their courage! 
Phoenix-like, 1420 rose from its ashes, a 
monument to the indomitable spirit of 
its city, and of the people it represent- 
ed. 

But the city of brotherly love had 
been growing faster than the dreams 
of the society. What had long been 
called West, had become Central. It 
seemed impossible to stem the rising 
tide of values, or the equally insistent 
flood of taxes! Like prudent house- 
holders, boards were looking westward 
for available sites for similar enter- 
prises. Seventeen hundred seemed a 
far cry from five hundred ; but it was 
not au,. adequate measure of the ex- 
pansion of the society's field, or the 
progress of its work. The rebuildinc; 
tasks now must include not only the 
"Roger Williams Headquarters", but al- 
so a great printing and manufacturing 



establishment. Surely "for such a time 
as this was our great new secretary 
called into service". All his earlier ex- 
periences were in daily requisition. No 
breadth of vision could fully map the 
fields opening before the society. The 
educational problem was fast becom- 
ing, — not only the problem of the 
churches, but, in a peculiar sense, the 
problem of democracy itself. 

Differentiation of labor had achiev- 
ed great business successes: it had 
also marked our spiritual organizations. 
Yet centralization is the other pole, 
and pendulum-like, human activity 
swings between. Cooperation waits to 
serve all interests, so soon as we con- 
sent to her gentle sway. Competition 
was the life of trade, even between re- 
ligious bodies. Hence missionary in- 
terests and educational operations might 
meet in generous rivalry: and publica- 
tion programs might overlap or rival 
both the others. Economy seemed pos- 
sible by delimitation. The youthful 
West was rearing a new generation of 
Baptists, and they rightly claimed rep- 
resentation in our National Societies. 
What more evident sign of progress 
than this? In 1888 at Washington we 
had seen the West score triumphantly 
in the organization of the new Educa- 
tion Society. But that was a quarter 
century ago! Is there not need of re- 
construction, of reorganization? 

Now is there need of the broad- 
minded, the generous spirit, the business 
training that had so long marked the 
conduct of the society's operations. 
Adjustment is largely a prophetic task, 
requiring a looking before, and after. 
Wisdom, as ever, will be justified of her 
children; but she wins by patient com- 
parison, by concession, and by com- 
promise. These call for our best en- 
deavors. Here was possible contro- 
versy; but, on closer inspection, it prov- 
ed to be a new inventory of resources 
and liabilities! Each society gained a 
larger comprehension of its sphere, a 
juster sense of its importance, a more 
confident assurance of its success. This 
beneficent result was due to the pres- 
ence on both boards of men to whom 
the results to be achieved outweighed 
any question of method or of agency. 
They heard and heeded the injunction: 
— "Look not every man on his own 
things, but every man also on the 
things of others! " 

It is good to remember that Dr. Row- 
land lived to witness this promise of 
new harmony and greater efficiency, in 
the work so dear to his heart! "And 
even greater things than these shall ye 
do!" must have come to his mind as 
he saw a new survey, which lifted both 
missionary and educational work to a 
prominence hitherto undreamed of: — 
with a Promotion Movement promis- 
ing the fulfillment of his brightest 
dreams. In such sunset glow. Dr. Row- 
land's life and endeavors found most 
significant realization! 

Dr. Rowland is survived by his 
widow, Mrs. Kate Hershey Rowland, 
seven children, six grandchildren, and 
one great grandchild. Arthur John 
Rowland, Sc.D., (Bucknell), Milwaukee, 
— Formerly Dean of Drexel Institute, 
with three children, — Mrs. Dorothy 
Roberts (Cap't Norman, U. S. N.), John 
Tudson, and Mary: Miss Mira Frick 
Rowland, Mrs. Louis A. Shepard, both 
of East Orange, N. J., children of Mrs. 
Harriet Frick Rowland, deceased. Her- 



bert Raymond Rowland, C.E., New 
York City, with two daughters. Misses 
Nathalie and Lucile; Charles Kingsley 
Rowland, Cleveland, O., with one child, 
Miss Florence Mira; Ernest Wilson 
Rowland, Mansfield, O., and Miss Kath- 
erine Beverly Rowland, Artist, New 
York City; children of Mrs. Kate Her- 
shey Rowland, 4423 Spruce street, Phila- 
delphia. 

® 

"Doc" Bolton, '88, Golf Fiend 



The facile pen of Frank McCracken, 
of the Public Ledger staff, is responsible 
for the following. The only thing he 
has failed to mention is "Doc" Bolton's 
favorite indoor sport, which is holding 
down the presidency of the Philadelphia 
Alumni Club. 

"Doc" Bolton. There's a golfer for 
you. There's a veteran linksman known 
wherever golf is played in the Phila- 
delphia district. There's an eminent 
surgeon who being just plain "Doc" to 
everyone he encounters on the links is a 
likable chap, and being a likable chap 
is liked by everyone who treads the 
turf with him. For Dr. Samuel Bolton 
has played golf many a year. He is 
an illustrious personage in the game so 
ardently played in this section of the 
country. There was a time that "Doc" 
felt the. thrill of leadership. In fact, 
until last year he played No. 1 on the 
Frankford team. That alone would 
suffice to make "Doc" known through- 
out the Philadelphia district, even if 
he were not blessed with a pleasing 
personality, the faculty of putting play- 
ers at their ease, and the power to 
spread good fellowship which always 
makes his presence in tournaments wel- 
come and in demand. 

There's "Doc" Bolton for you. There's 
a man who happened to be living near 
the site selected for the Frankford 
Country Club when it was founded, 
and, who, not wishing to miss any- 
thing in the way of sport, was one of 
its charter members. Not only did 
"Doc" start playing golf when the club 
opened its course, but he soon became 
so proficient in wielding driver and 
mashie that he was chosen to lead 
the Frankford team in the Suburban 
League competitions. 

Playing Nineteen Years 

That was a long time ago. It has 
been nineteen years since "Doc" first 
sallied forth to battle, playing No. 1 on 
the Frankford team. Despite the fact 
that in the last fe%v years Frankford 
has perhaps contributed a larger quota 
of young stars to the game than any 
other club here, "Doc" would still lead 
the Frankford contingent if it were not 
for the fact that his duties demand so 
much of his time. 

After getting into golf "Doc" had no 
time for any other athletics. Before 
that he played considerable baseball, 
and could handle a tennis racquet with 
fineness. He graduated from Bucknell 
in 18SS, and while there played first 
base on the varsity baseball team. Later 
he played first for the Oxford team, 
of Frankford. Even though he was a 
rabid baseball fan, after having ven- 
tured onto the links, the potent charm 
of golf laid hold of him and "Doc" 
became so interested he forgot other 
sportG. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



P 



ersonais 



1 



1862 

As an instance of how active the late 
Dr. A. J. Rowland was, up to the time 
of his death, we note an item in the 
Baptist of date just preceding his death, 
which spoke of him as invaluable in hio 
service on special committees of the 
Philadelphia Baptist Union, Chairman 
of the Trustees of the Chestnut Street 
Church, lecturing regularly at the Bap- 
tist Institute, and attending to the 
trustees' business of Bucknell. Dr. 
Rowland at the time of his death was 
engaged m compiling some reminiscen- 
ces of his college days for the Monthly. 
1875 
Dr. D. L. McKinney is in the auto 
sales business, residing at Sioux Falls, 
S. D. 

1878 
The Rev. Darius A. Blose is at pres- 
ent located at Ashtabula, Ohio. 
1879 
Dr. John Howard Groff may be ad- 
dressed at Route B2, Box 415, Indian- 
apolis, Ind. 

1880 
A reception was tendered Prof, and 
Mrs. W. G. Owens on Saturday even- 
ing, December 11th, by the Union 
County District Sabbath School Asso- 
ciation. On the following Sunday even- 
ing one of the largest religious gather- 
ings ever seen in Lewisburg was held 
in the Methodist Church, when at a 
Union Service Prof, and Mrs. Owens 
spoke on the World Sunday School 
Convention at Tokio. 
1881 
The Rev. Franklin G. McKeever, ex- 
'81, resides at 135 Sixth street, Provi- 
dence, Rhode Island. 
1884 
Director Ernest L. Tustin recently 
addressed the Northwest Social Union 
on welfare work by the city of Phila- 
delphia. 

Milton W. Shreve is a member of the 
Appropriations Committee of the House 
of Representatives. 

Marshall G. Smith is a representa- 
tive of the C. Howard Hunt Pen Co. 
Mail address to Savona, New York, 
will reach him. 

1885 
Dr. Samuel Zane Batten presided at 
the meeting of the Council of the Penn- 
sylvania Federation of Churches at 
Philadelphia, December 14th. 
1888 
John W. Griffith has removed from 
Waverly, Iowa, to Wilton Junction, 
Iowa, where he may be addressed, % J. 
Bowen Griffith. 

1892 
Charles W. Allen is a farmer at Twin 
Sisters, Ore. 

1894 

Franklin R. Strayer is teaching 
Physics in the Morris High School, 
166th street and Boston road, the Bronx, 
New York, and resides at 11 Primrose 
avenue, Mount Vernon, New York. 

Dr, Levi Lore Riggin is a practicing 



physician at 120 Arroyo Drive, Pasa- 
dena, Cal. 

The Rev. Charles Franklin McMann 
is at present pastor at Corydon, Iowa. 

Harvey L. Fassett is a teacher in the 
college of the City of Newark, and re- 
sides at 554 Highland avenue, Newark, 
N.J. 

1895 

Prof. F. M. Simpson spent Christmas 
with his family in Florida. Mrs. Simp- 
son is spending the winter there. 
1896 

The Rev. A. A. Cober, of the Me- 
morial Baptist Church of Newberry, 
who was to have re-entered missionary 
service in Mexico with Mrs. Cober, had 
the pleasant embarrassment of having 
his resignation refused. In a pastorate 
of only three years, the minister led the 
church in the payment of a debt of the 
church property, and in a community 
ministry of striking value. At the earn- 
est solicitation of the Home Mission So- 
ciety of the Baptist denomination, he 
agreed to take up a work of strategic 
importance in Mexico, but the church 
refused even to consider his resignation. 
1897 

Dr. Thomas H. Sprague has had great 
success in his new pastorate at Ridge- 
wood, N. J. Since October he has ex- 
tended the hand of fellowship to twenty- 
four new members. 
1898 

The Rev. Joseph H. Cooke has re- 
signed the pastorate of the Hazleton 
Baptist Church. 

1899 

Mrs. Bertha Watkins Bridge is a stu- 
dent in the Chicago Osteopathic College, 
and has an office at 910 Marshall Field 
Annex. 

John A. Herman is proprietor of the 
Herman Farm at Fomball, Pa., where 
he is specializing in the breeding of Hol- 
stein Friesian cattle. 

George L. Reese, ex-'99, resides at 
206 Lenox Road, Brooklyn, N. Y. He 
is engaged in journalism and real estate. 
1900 

The address of Prof. I. W. Huntz- 
berger, ex-'OO, of Central High School, 
Washington, has been changed to 215 
Montgomery street. Chevy Chase, 
Washington, D. C. 

Eugene C. Switzer is superintendent 
of the Petoskey Portland Cement Co., 
residing at 725 Lockwood avenue, Pe- 
toskey, Mich. 

The Rev. Winfield Scott Holland, is 
the pastor of the Roslindale Congrega- 
tional Church, Boston, Mass., and re- 
sides at 98 Hewlett street, Boston, 31, 
Mass. 

1901 

Elmer Myers is Secretary of Yankton 
College, Yankton, S. D. 

The Rev. A. S. Bechtel has removed 
from Normal, 111., to Pulaski, Iowa, 
where he is pastor of the Mennonite 
Church. 

A. M. Allison is instructor of mathe- 
matics in the Lakeview High School, 



Chicago. His address is 345 Orchard 
Lane, Highland Park, 111. 
1902 

George E. Edgett, ex-'02, is located 
at 719 South Olympia avenue, Tulsa, 
Oklahoma. 

Dr. J. Sidney Hofia, ex-'02, is prac- 
ticing medicine in South Williamsport. 
1903 

F. W. Mitchell, ex-'03, is President 
of the Crescent Sales and Manufactur- 
ing Co., 110 South Dearborn street, 
Chicago, HI. 

Dr. M. F. Forbell is President of Al- 
derson Academy, West Virginia. 

Emily Ebling has been coaching the 
Girl's Debating Team of Germantown 
High School. 

1904 

W. S. Wilcox, Louis W. Robey and 
Harry E. McCormick held an informal 
reunion in Lewisburg during the vaca- 
tion. 

Charles S. Shepard, ex-'04, is now liv- 
ing at 121 East Webster avenue, Roselle 
Park, N. J. He is married, has two chil- 
dren and is engaged in the insurance 
business in New York. 

William Martz visited R. W. (Coxie) 
Thompson early in January. 

Durham Brothers, Architects, of 
which firm James D. Durham is a mem- 
ber, announce the removal of their of- 
fices to 1611 Sansom street, Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

Chester B. Renn is head of the De- 
partment of English at the South- 
western State Normal, California, Pa. 

Alif Stephens has gone to Norwich, 
Conn., where she will remain sometime 
visiting her aunt, Mrs. Gertrude H. 
Gale. Her address will be 154 Wash- 
ington street. 

Miss Alif Stephens, '04, who has been 
employed in Adjutant General's Office, 
War Dept., Washington, D. C, spent 
a few days visiting friends in Lewis- 
burg. Her address for a few months 
will be 154 Washington street, Norwich, 
Conn. 

1905 

W. W. Portser is supervisor on the 
Pennsylvania system at Kittanning. 

Charles Marsh is at "Kiski", training 
boys to make records for their school 
as he used to do at Bucknell. 

T. H. Eisenhauer has recently remov- 
ed from McKeesport to Beaver, Pa., 
where he is superintendent of schools. 

Jess McFarland-Thomas is President 
of the Women's College Club of Al- 
toona, Pa. 

Mr. and Mrs. Roy G. Bostwick spent 
the Christmas holidays in Lewisburg. 
1906 

Theodore Park is a bond salesman at 
Dry Run, Franklin County. 

Dr. Amos Barton spent Christmas 
with friends in Lewisburg. His present 
residence is at 761 East 31sr street. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Edwin G. Jack is an oil operator at 
Rexford, McKean County. He has 
twenty-two oil wells. 

The Rev, Thomas Benjamin Powell 



10 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



is at present preaching in East Orange, 
N. J. His address is 18 Winthrop Ter- 
race. 

Charles A. Knupp is located at Gar- 
dena, California, R. D. No. 1. 
1907 

W. W. Raker has been convalescing 
from an operation for appendicitis per- 
formed in December. He will return 
when recovered to Columbia University. 

Harry D. Reese is still at Igloo, 
Alaska, as Principal of Schools, and 
local superintendent of a reindeer farm. 

E. W. Whitney who is an attorney 
at Wewoka, Oklahoma, expects to re- 
turn for Commencement this spring. 

Jay Wolfe is electric welding and 
track specialist with the Chicago Sur- 
face Lines. He resides at 507 East 60th 
street, Chicago, 111. 

Mrs. Maude Rees-Landers is "a wife, 
mother and home maker" at Flushing, 
N. Y. 

Lawrence O. Manley, of New York, 
was admitted on January 1st to part- 
nership in the firm of R. G. Rankin 
& Co., Public Accountants. 

E M. Fassett is engaged in coal pro- 
duction with W. M. August at Brock- 
wayville, Pa. 

1908 

Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Hostetter, of 
Corning, N. Y., were visiting old 
friends in Lewisburg during the holi- 
days. 

George W. Kerschner is a solicitor 
for the Prudential Insurance Co. in 
Pittsburgh, residing at 239 Forty-fifth 
street. 

Mrs. Helen Forrest-Hershey resides 
at 901 Lawrence street, Chicago, 111. 

L. O. Piersol is now at Alamo Gordo, 
New Mexico, with the Southwestern 
Lumber Co. 

Mrs Charles L. Myers, formerly Mar- 
garet Kalp, resides at 109 Brookdale 
avenue, Glenside, Pa. 

Olive Richards is just now in pub- 
licity work for the Y. W. C. A. in Rich- 
mond, Va. 

Beatrice Richards spent the summer 
in Honolulu. She now resides at 411 
Prescott Avenue, Scranton, Pa. 

Jean Hopwood arrived in Honolulu 
the week before Miss Richards left. 

Helen Tiffany-Shaplin is taking ed- 
ucational work at Columbia, prepara- 
tory to teaching, and resides at 48 
Trinity avenue. Ocean Side, Long 
Island. Mrs. Shaplin was doubly un- 
fortunate in losing her husband and 
father by death on the same day, Au- 
gust 19th. She has two small sons. 

In the December number of Missions 
is the picture of two of the sons of the 
Rev. E. Carrol Condict. They could 
speak three languages when they 
left Burma — English, Burmese, and 
Chin. They now speak a fourth lan- 
guage, American. 

1909 

Mrs. Mabel Slout-Weeter resides at 
6009 Woodlawn avenue, Chicago, 111. 

Newton C. Fetter, who is Baptist stu- 
dent Pastor in Boston, is unusually suc- 
cessful with the Sunday evening ser- 
vices, having an average attendance of 
175. 

Mrs. Herman E. Abbott, formerly 
Mary Meyer, resides at 87 Franklin ave- 
nue, Hawthorne, N. J. 

George F. Ballets is now located at 
1191 Clinton avenue, Irvington, N. J. 

G. Norman Wilkinson is conducting 
a successful business at his taxidermy 



shop in Williamsport, where he employs 
seventeen men. 

1910 

Mrs. L. W. Beibigheiser, formerly 
Bertha Geis, resides at Central Nyack, 
N. J. 

Jesse Park is teaching in the Public 
Schools at Hazleton, residing at 119 
West Second street. 

G. Howard Northrop is spending the 
winter in Lewisburg. 

Frank H. Painter was a recent Lewis- 
burg caller. 

Information is desired by the Alumni 
office concerning Frank M. Jenner, Wil- 
liam Joseph Schultz and Alexander M. 
Sherwood. 

1911 

Clarence K. Pugh is located at 1701 
North St. Paul street, Baltimore. He is 
with the B. & O. Railroad. 

Evelyn McCaskie is teaching in the 
schools of San Juan, Porto Rico, and 
living at Hotel Axmayer, Santurce, San 
Juan, Porto Rico. 

J. Leslie Crowell is an instructor in 
the schools of Perth Amboy, N. J., re- 
siding at 97 Gordon street. 

Leroy Johnson, ex-'ll, may be ad- 
dressed % Y. M. C. A., Fort Dodge, 
Iowa. 

1912 

Fred Lange is Chief Estimator for the 
Consolidated Engineering Co., of Balti- 
more. 

Mrs. F. E. Williams, formerly Pearl 
Ream, visited relatives in town dur- 
ing vacation. 

Earle R. Bartholomew was operated 
on for appendicitis at the Williamsport 
Hospital in December. 

Maze Callahan-Housknecht resides at 
919 East 56th street, Chicago, 111. 

Dr. Arthur David Waltz is a physi- 
cian located at 3601 Walnut street, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

1913 

Hartley Powell is located at Mt. 
Washington, Md. 

Grace Rossiter has resigned her posi- 
tion in the Williamsport High School 
to enter business in Sunbury. 

W. C. Hulley, Jr., is teaching mathe- 
matics at the Knoxville Union High 
School, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

J. Bowen Griffith has removed from 
Waverly, Iowa, to Wilton Junction, 
Iowa. 

E. M. Richards, who was formerly 
Assistant to the Manager of Engineer- 
ing for the Westinghouse Airbrake Co., 
has resigned that position to accept the 
position of Consulting Engineer with 
H. O. Swoboda, of Pittsburgh, with 
authority next to that of Mr. Swoboda 
himself. 

1914 

Allen I. Davis, ex-'14, resides at 48 
Holbrook street. North Adams, Mass. 

Dorothea Jones is teaching in the 
schools of Minersville, Pa. 

J. R. Golightly is Wilkes-Barre Of- 
fice Manager for W. E. Stedman Co., 
125 North Pennsylvania avenue, Wilkes- 
Barre. Pa. 

C. W. Lotte visited in town during 
December. 

1915 

Wm. T. Goodwin has charge of the 
furnaces of the Steel Smelter at Chi- 
cago Heights, and resides at Glenwood, 
111. 

Jeremiah Bates, who is principal of 
the Meshoppen schools, visited in 
Lewisburg during the Christmas recess. 



Albert J. Clark is Assistant to the 
Engineer in Charge at Westinghouse, 
Church, Farr & Co., 820 Jefferson ave- 
nue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

G. Thompson Keech is salesman for 
the Westinghouse Electric and Manu- 
facturing Co., and resides at The Black- 
wood, 4514 Clarendon avenue, Chicago, 
111. 

Frank P. Cruikshank, ex'15, is located 
in Sioux City, Iowa. 

G. Wade Earle is teaching in the 
Cleveland Heights High School, and 
resides at present at the Regent Hotel. 

The Pitman, N. J., Baptist Church, of 
which the Rev. E. O. Clark is pastor, 
welcomed 46 new members during the 
year. 

Frank F. Whittam is general time- 
keeper for the Merchant Shipbuilding 
Co., residing at 4619 Locust street, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Mrs. Paul P. Aller may be addressed 
after February 1, at 230 Woodbine 
street, Harrisburg, Pa. 

1916 

Madonna Harris is teaching in the 
Athens, Pa., High School. 

Kimber M. Persing is teaching chem- 
istry and general science at the Glen- 
ville High School, Cleveland, O. 

H. M. Sanders, formerly designing 
engineer with the Westinghouse Elec- 
tric, is at present teaching physics in the 
Turtle Creek, Pa., High School. 

Mrs. Edna Sayenga Fahringer re- 
sides at 2902 East 91st street, Chicago, 
111. 

1917 

Hugh Russell is located at 22 Pros- 
pect street, Mt. Washington, Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. He is teaching at Bellevue 
High School. 

Mrs. Carl A. Schug, formerly Alice 
Johnson, resides at 404 Main street, 
South Williamsport, Pa. 

Clinton I. Sprout in December re- 
signed his position at Keystone Acad- 
emy to accept one at Peddie Institute, 
Hightstown, N. J., where he began 
work this month. 

Katherine Clayton resides at 229 
Northland avenue, Buffalo, N. Y., and 
teaches in the Buffalo schools. 

Frank E. Stetler may be addressed at 
Room 722, Y. M. C. A., Milwaukee, 
Wis. 

Frank S. Hartman is principal of the 
New Freedom, Pa., High School. 

St. Clair Murray has removed from 
Binghamton, N. Y., to Sayre, Pa., 
where he is the new head of the Sayre 
Electric Co. The Coleman Memorial 
basketball team of Sayre is anxious to 
enlist this former Varsity player in its 
ranks. 

1918 

Alvin J. Adams is in the advertising 
department of the H. J. Heinz Co., of 
Pittsburgh, residing at 111 E. Mont- 
gomery avenue, N. S. 

Russell Boyer, who is with the State 
Highway Department at Washington, 
Pa., visited the hill early in January. 

Howard L. Rosenberger is teaching 
in the Engineering Department of the 
Catholic LTniversity, and resides at 1026 
Newton street, N. E., Washington, D. C. 

Bruce C. Ranck is a chemist with the 
DuPonts, residing at the Colonial Hotel, 
Pennsgrove, N. J. 

1919 

Helen Van Dyne is head of the De- 
partment of Social Studies of the 
Washington, N. J., High School. Her 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



11 



address is 202 West Washington ave- 
nue. 

Five men of this class are with the 
Empire Gas and Fuel Co. F. Ames 
Lawrence is with the Oil Production 
Division, at Duncan, Okla; Karl D. 
Smith is with the Geological Depart- 
ment as Technologist, at El Dorado, 
Kan.; Howard F. Pars is in the Stores 
Department, and Frank H. Riale is now 
with the Gas Division, while L. H. 
Garner is in the Gas Pipeline Depart- 
ment, at Pawhuska, Okla. 

Wm. J. Pearson is stationed at New 
Orleans for the winter. He is in the 
employ of the Ford Motor Co., and 
may be addressed at 802 Pine street. 

Edwin M. Keough is part owner of 
the Keough Canning Co., at Frank- 
linville, N. J. 

Ernest F. Sender is a chemical engi- 
neer with the Empire Refineries Co., at 
Tulsa, Okla. 

Benjamin Markowitz, ex-'19, is a stu- 
dent at the Loyola Medical School, 806 
Grace street, Chicago, 111. 

Mrs. Edward Robbins resides at 897 
Stevenson Road, Cleveland, O. 

Emerson C. Cupp has charge of the 
laboratories of the General Chemical 
Co., of New York, at E. St. Louis, 111., 
his address being 1317 Pennsylvania 
avenue, E. St. Louis. 

Harry H. Angel is Construction and 
Maintenance Engineer in the Electrical 
Department of the Bethlehem Steel Co., 
at its Sparrows Point, Md., plant. 

Elizabeth M. Paterson is teaching in 
the Modern Language Department of 
the New Kensington, Pa., High School. 

Mrs. R. W. Chubb, formerly Mar- 
garet Buck, resides at Weldon, Pa. 
1920 

Wm. W. Masterton is a chemist in the 
Edison Lamp Works of the General 
Electric Co., at Harrison, N. J. 

George P. Little is an insurance agent 
at Montrose, Pa. 

Russell R. Stout spent Christmas in 
Lewisburg and vicinity. 

James E. Robbins is located at 897 
Stevenson Road, Cleveland Ohio. He 
is an inspector with the Cleveland Trac- 
tor Co. 

George A. Smith and Charles M. Em- 
erick, of Western Reserve Law School, 
and Dwight Rude, who is teaching in 
Carbondale High School, were in town 
during the vacation. 

Helen Reed is teaching science in 
New Brunswick, N. J., Senior High 
School. 

John Clayton Yon is a member of the 
staff at the Hotel Flanders, Atlantic 
City, N. J. 

Felix Piekarski, of Penn Law School, 
was in town during the vacation. 

John A. Mason is with the American 
Telephone and Telegraph Co., and may 
be addressed at 1814 Park street, Har- 
risburg, Pa. 

Robert C. Umlauf is now with the 
Sun Printing & Binding Co., of Wil- 
liamsport. 

Herbert E. Stover is in the English 
Department of the Central State Nor- 
mal School at Lock Haven. He is 
teaching Composition and Methods of 
Teaching English. 

Harry R. Warfel is teaching English 
and German at St. John's School, Man- 
lius, N. Y. He instituted a course in 
public speaking, but due to the de- 
struction by fire of the Academic build- 
ing several weeks ago, this department 
has been discontinued until the new 
building is completed. 



MARRIAGES 

Harris-Embrey 

Miss Ruth E. Embrey, '16, was mar- 
ried to Stanley Newton Harris, '18, at 
Mt. Washington, Pittsburgh, Pa., De- 
cember 31. The ceremony was performed 
by the Rev. Charles Embrey, father of 
the bride, assisted by Dr. John Howard 
Harris, father of the groom. The best 
man was James Pardon Harris, brother 
of the groom, and the bridesmaid was 
Miss Embrey, sister of the bride. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harris will be at home 
at Philippi, W. Va. 

Garner-Hall 

At a double wedding at the Episcopal 
Church of Bart'esville, Okla., December 
23, Miss Olive Hall, of the Oil Produc- 
tion Division of the Empire Co., and 
Lloyd L. Garner, '19, were married. 

After the wedding Mr. and Mrs. Gar- 
ner left for Council Grove, Kansas, to 
visit Mrs. Garner's family. 

Hurley-Ridgway 

On Tuesday, October 26, Miss Olive 
Young Ridgway, of Salem, N. J., and Mr. 
Norman K. Hurley, ex-'18, were mar- 
ried. Mr. and Mrs. Hurley will be at 
home after November 15, at 68 Walnut 
street, Salem, N. J. Mr. Hurley was a 
member of the Sigma Chi Fraternity. 

® 

DEATHS 

Eli Slifer, ex-'72 

Eli Slifer, ex-'72, who was killed in 
Chicago during Christmas week, was in- 
terred in Lewisburg. 

Some mystery surrounds his death, 
which as yet has not been fully explain- 
ed. 

Mr. Slifer was in his sixty-seventh 
year. He was a speaker and evangelist 
of some note, and was engaged in a 
Chicago down-town mission in evan- 
gelistic work. 

Rev. E. D. ShuU, '77 

The Rev. E. D. Shull, of the class of 
1877, died at Philadelphia, December 12, 
aged seventy-one 5'ears. Particulars of 
his death are unknown. 

Hester Pyles Duff, '11 

Hester Pyles Duff, wife of Walter W. 
Duff, /ll, died in Denver very suddenly 
last August, of typhoid fever contract- 
ed from her eldest child. At the time 
of her death she was visiting her sister, 
Lillian E. Duff, Institute, '11. 

She is survived by her husband and 
three small children, June, Walter Wil- 
liam, Jr., and Nancy. 

® 

BIRTHS 



Born to the Rev. and Mrs. Raymond 
G. Pierson, November 21, a daughter, 
Margaret Priscilla. 

Born to Mr. and Mrs. Leon M. Cran- 
dell, ex-'12, and Inst., '09, a daughter, 
Leone, May 15, 1920. 

Born to Mr. and Mrs. John D. W. 
Fetter, a boy, December 4th. He is 
named George Cross Fetter, after Mrs. 
Fetter's father, Professor George Cross, 
of Rochester Seminary. 

The Fetters are located at Ithaca, 
N. Y., where Mr. Fetter is Baptist Uni- 
versity Pastor. 



The New Ruling on 

Advanced Degrees 

The faculty recently passed new regu- 
lations on advanced degrees recom- 
mended by the Committee on Ad- 
vanced Degrees. The ruling for the 
Master's degree and the engineering de- 
grees are as follows: 

The degrees of Master of Arts and 
Master of Science will be conferred up- 
on Bachelors of Arts or of Science who 
shall have satisfied the following re- 
quirements: 

1. One year of resident work. Grad- 
uates of BuckneU University may do 
the work in absentia, but will not be 
given the degree in less than three years 
after graduation. 

Graduates of BuckneU University 
who, at the end of their Senior year, 
have completed one-half of the work 
required for the Master's degree may 
be admitted to the Master's degree one 
year after receiving the Bachelor's de- 
gree. 

2. The completion, with a grade not 
lower than B, of thirty hours' work of 
an advanced nature of which at least 
a Major of eighteen hours must be in 
one department. AU courses must have 
the approval of the head of the depart- 
ment in which the Major is chosen, and 
of the Committee on Advanced De- 
grees. No credit will be given for work 
done in other institutions which has 
been counted for a degree. 

The special field in which the work 
is done will be designated in the Master 
of Science diplomas when recommend- 
ed by the professor. 

The degrees of Civil Engineer, Elec- 
trical Engineer, Mechanical Engineer 
and Chemical Engineer will be confer- 
red only upon persons who have proven 
their ability to plan and direct profes- 
sional work or original research in ap- 
plied science. The candidate must have 
received a Bachelor's degree from Buck- 
neU University at least five years be- 
fore registration for the advanced de- 
gree, and must have practiced his pro- 
fession successfully for a sirtiilar period, 
during at least one year of which he 
must have had responsible charge of 
work as principal or assistant. When a 
candidate registers he must present a 
detailed account of his professional ex- 
perience, which must be approved by 
the Committee on Advanced Degrees in 
consultation with the Professor in 
charge of the department in which he 
registers. Candidates must also pre- 
sent a satisfactory thesis, or an approv- 
ed equivalent of the same, which shall 
give evidence of their fitness to receive 
the degree sought. This thesis may not 
be a mere description of engineering 
work of a usual character, nor a digest 
of existing literature, but shaU describe 
or contain some distinct contribution 
to the engineering profession. 

Membership of an approved grade in 
the principal engineering or technical 
societies may be considered sufficient 
evidence of a candidate's fitness to re- 
ceive an engineering degree. 



'19 — Elizabeth Paterson is teaching 
Latin, French and Spanish in New 
Kensington. Pa., High School. She en- 
joyed the Glee Club concert at Vander- 
grift, November 27. 



12 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



Ax-Grinding and Other Matters 



(Continued from Page Two) 

The alumni who stirred things up re- 
turn to their homes confident that they 
have aroused the Association from its 
long slumber. They become engrossed 
in other matters, forget to pay their 
annual dues, and do not return for five 
or ten years. 

The following year a new set of 
alumni and a new set of ideas appear, 
and history repeats itself. 

Meantime the Board of Managers 
and the officers go on from year to year 
carrying things a'ong as best they can, 
subject to annual proddings from Com- 
mencement visitants. 

As to "ax-grinding" — well, whatever 
is accomplished comes largely through 
the personal effort and sacrifice of the 
officers. As in all worth-while organiza- 
tions, there is more labor and criticism 
than honor to be gained by officers. 
One thinks, for instance, of Mrs. C. A. 
Gundy's long and faithful service as 
secretary. One thinks of President "Joe" 
Henderson's effort to save time in the 
short annual meeting by printing the 
minutes at his own expense. One thinks 
of Mrs. Theiss' cheerful and constant 
labors on the Phi Beta Kappa com- 
mittee. Such instances might be multi- 
plied. 

And the alumni who stir things up 
annually are inspired for the most part 
by no ax-grinding spirit, but by an 
honest desire to help things along. They 
are handicapped, however, by their ig- 
norance of conditions and the inade- 
quate manner of doing business. No 
organization can really do business by 
meeting for two hours once a year, with 
the personnel of members in attendance 
varying certainly 75 percent from year 
to year; especially when the entire num- 
ber in attendance constitutes a small 
fraction of the entire alumni body. It 
is almost inevitable that hasty and un- 
wise action should at times be taken. 

That these conditions may easily be 
remedied is apparent from the com- 
munication of Dr. Goldsmith. I should 
like to add the suggestion that to the 
provisions relating to the "Executive 
Council" be added one to the effect 
that it meet in Lewisburg during the 
college year, and that its recommenda- 
tions for action be presented in printed 
form for a postal vote. 

I cannot stress too strongly, either, 
the importance of a full-time Alumni 
Secretary, to furnish the continuity that 
has heretofore been lacking. In addi- 
tion to editing the Alumni Monthly it 
would be his duty to keep in active 
touch with the alumni by correspond- 
ence and travel. This office could very 
well be combined with the Graduate 
Managership, provided the incumbent 
be supplied with an adequate office 
force to carry on the routine. 

Perhaps the Truth-seeker will not be 
convinced by the foregoing. My point 
has been simply that if the Alumni As- 
sociation has not in the past accom- 
plished all it might have, it has been 
due to conditions which in the future 
may easily be remedied. To remedy these 
conditions, however, it will be necessary 
for the alumni not to sit back philoso- 
phically and seek abstract truth, but to 
get together as a body IN THE ASSO- 



CIATION and tackle definite concrete 
problems. Not destructive criticism 
from without, but constructive criticism 
from within is the need. I repeat that 
the "greatest of the rights and respon- 
sibilities of the alumni is membership in 
the Alumni Association". 

® 

Shall We Reorganize? 

(Continued from Page Two) 

Board of Trustees, and the Presi- 
dent. This would make a real 
representative body. All other 
branches of the college life and in- 
terests could be taken care of in 
the same way. To me such a 
method of working would be al- 
most ideal. 
I have been out of touch, while you 
know just what is going on. What we 
need is a good live publicity man — 
Bucknell is insular — the geographical 
situation, telegraph and mail con- 
ditions are such as to make all work of 
this kind very difficult. But we must 
advertise. All the other schools are 
doing it. That is our main hope. 
Yours, 

Maurice F. Goldsmith. 
® 

General Bliss Pleads 

For Disarmament 



Trustees Hold Busy Session 



(Continued from Page Six) 
mum. In that connection he declared 
those who advocate total disarmament 
were well-meaning enemies rather than 
friends of the cause of world peace. In 
the remainder of his discourse the gen- 
eral chiefly concerned himself with out- 
lining how the limitation of armaments 
could be accomplished, and toward the 
end of his talk he offered some definite 
recommendations. 

"Edward Bok, president of the Acad- 
emy of Music Corporation, presided. He 
announced that Colonel Edward M. 
House, under whose supervision the 
forum was arranged, had been unable 
to come to Philadelphia, but would be 
present at some of the subsequent 
talks". — Philadelphia Public Ledger. 

The address, which was delivered De- 
cember 10, awakened in the next few 
days extended comment in the press of 
the United States and Europe. It is 
regarded as one of the most forcible 
pleas ever made for limitation of arma- 
ments, coming with the greater effect 
from a man whose entire life had been 
in the military service. 

'- ® 

fNew Registrar Takes Office 

Mr. B. F. Thomas will conclude his 
work as Registrar at Bucknell with the 
end of this semester. 

Mr. Theron Clark, the new Regis- 
trar, will take office February first. Mr. 
Clark is a graduate of Brown Univer- 
sity, of the class of 1895; immediately 
after graduation he became Assistant 
to the Registrar at Brown, remaining in 
office during the presidency of E. Ben- 
jamin Andrews, for twenty years. For 
the past five years he has been con- 
nected with the firm of Ward, Fisher, 
Felbrick, Accountants, of Providence. 

He came to Lewisburg January first 
in order to become acquainted with the 
work here before taking charge. 



The Board of Trustees at its Decem- 
ber session disposed of a large budget 
of business. 

The modified plan for the campus ex- 
tension was submitted by the architects, 
Carrere and Hastings, of New York, 
and was carefully gone over and adopt- 
ed. This general plan lays down the 
lines for development of the campus as 
definitely as is possible at the present 
time. It is planned with a view to fit- 
ting the future expansion into the pres- 
ent arrangement of buildings, and when 
completed will give Bucknell a plant 
which will be quite adequate to the ex- 
pected growth of many years. 

An immediate building program was 
decreed. The Mechanical Engineering 
wing of the Engineering Building and 
an addition to the Chemical Laboratory 
are to be erected as soon as weather 
permits. 

Additions to the faculty will be made 
in the Chemistry, Economics and Eng- 
lish Departments. 

Several members of the faculty were 
granted leave of absence for next year: 
Dean Anna R. Carey, of the Women's 
College, Assistant Professor H. S. Ever- 
ett, of the Mathematics Department, 
Assistant Professor John W. Rice, of 
the Biology Department, and Assistant 
Professor W. H. Schuyler, of the De- 
partment of Chemistry. 

® 



Prof. C. A. Lindemann has just re- 
ceived the following card from George 
S. Tilley at 122 Higashi-Machi, Kobe, 
Japan. "Dear Linde — Little slow about 
getting here, due to the Hon. war, but 
making up for lost time. Think a job 
in Australia will be next on the pro- 
gram. Sure, why not? Wishing you a 
Merry Christmas and a Happy New 
Year and all that sort of thing. Yours 
as ever, George S. Tilley". 

® 



A New Trustee 



(Continued from Page Six) 

since he became Vice-president, the 
membership has more than doubled, so 
that it is now the largest in the United 
States. 

He recently organized and is chair- 
man of the Trades Council of the Man- 
ufacturers' Club, of Philadelphia, a club 
composed of representatives of the 
various manufacturing concerns in and 
about Philadelphia, organized to study 
the economic needs of the manufactur- 
ing industry in that section. 

He is at present prominent on a com- 
mittee forming to perfect plans for a 
World's Fair to be he'd in Philadelphia 
in 19'26, to ce'et)rate the one hundred 
and fiftieth anniversary of the nation's 
birth. 

His other clubs are the Lhiion League, 
Philadelphia Country, Merion Cricket 
and Overbrook Golf Club. He is a 
Knight Templar and 32nd Degree 
Mason. 

Mr. Vaughan was married to Fannie 
Winthrop Thomas and has two child- 
ren,, Catherine Nelson, born in 1906, 
and Barbara Thomas, born in 190S. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



13 



ADVERTISING RATES 2% for cash in 30 days. 

ITime 4 Times 6 Times 

1 inch deep, 1 column $ 1.00 S 3.50 S 5.00 CIRCULATION. 1920, 2100; 1921, 2500. 

1 inch deep, 3 columns 3.00 10.00 14.00 

V4 page 6.00 22.50 32.00 Copy due first of month. Send your ad to 

V2 page 9.00 33.00 48.00 „ o -c-wTrDTrTT t u t, 

Full Page 15.00 57.50 85.00 H. S. EVERETT, Lewisburg, Pa. 

Teachers for N ATIO N A L TEACH ERS' AG EN CY, I HC. schools for 

Schools Teachers 

D. H. Cook, Mgr., 326-27-28 Perry BIdg., 1530 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

"I HAVE PROMOTED OVER 15,000 TEACHERS. WHY NOT YOU?"— D. H. Cook. 

Bucknell Graduates Wanted. Have Placed Hundreds of Them 



Under the Same Management Thirty- 
Seven Years 
The School Bulletin Teachers' 
Agency has on its lists many Buck- 
nell graduates, and has placed Buck- 
nell men and women in high and nor- 
mal schools in New York, New Jer- 
sey, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, 
Vermont, Kentucky, West Virginia 
and Texas. An agency which per- 
sonally recommends its members to 
places for which it has been asked 
to offer candidates. Registration 
blanks and full information on re- 
quest. 
C.W.Bardeen, Mgr., Syracuse, N. Y. 



Modern Teachers' 
Bureau 

1002 Market St., Philadelphia 
Needs Hundreds of High Grade 
Teachers for every department of 
educational work. 

FREE REGISTRATION 

and no expense unless position is 
secured. 



MOORE BUILDING 
SUPPLY CO. 

Milton, Pa. 

Distributors of 

All Kinds of Building 
Material 

Agents for 

Johns-Manville Co. 



BUCKINELL UFMIVERSITV 

EMORY W. HUNT, D. D., LL. D., PRESIDENT 

Alumni : Help us maintain and increase a waiting list of applicants for admission by filling 
out the blanks below: 



B. F. Thomas, Registrar. 

Dear Sir: — 

The following are prospective 
college students of the first rank and 
should be on Bucknell's roll next fall. 
I recommend them on the basis of 
scholarship and leadership. 



Signed 



B. F. Thomas, Registrar. • 

Dear Sir: — 

Please send information about 
. .Arts Courses 
..Preparation for Ministry 
. .Preparation for Teaching 
..Preparation for Law 
..Preparation for Medicine 
. .Preparation for Business 
. .Preparation for Social Work 
..Mechanical Engineering 
. . Electrical Engineering 
. . Civil Engineering 
. . Chemical Engineering 
. .Science Courses 
. .School of Music 
..General Catalog 
. .Campus Views 
. .Expenses 
. .Application for Admission 

To 



Signed 



Established, 1892 
First Instruction, 1853 



BUCKNELL UNIVERSITY 



11 Teachers 
177 Pupils 



THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

Emory W. Hunt, Pres. 
Paul G. Stolz, '08, Director 

The Supervisor's Course in the School of Music is based on Commonwealth requirements, and students com- 
pleting the course are exempt from examination. 



COURSES: 



Piano, 


4 yrs. 


Violincello, 


4 yrs. 


Voice, 4 yrs. 


Orchestra 


Pipe Organ, 


4 yrs. 


Contrabass, 


4 yrs. 


Teachers' Course, 4 yrs. 


History 


Violin, 


4 yrs. 


Viola 




Harmony, 
Theory. 


Oratorio 
Opera 



14 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



For Real Service, Let B. U. Men Serve You 



During the past few years over five hundred (500) Bucknell Students Lave taken 
out Life Insurance policies -witn the Equitable Life of Iowa. Successful men invari- 
abxy are men -who, in early years, realized the value of life insurance. 

Life Insurance makes for Success 

Tyson, 11 RICE & TYSON, Gen. Agts., 906 Kunkel Bldg., Harrisburg, Pa. 



Andrew A. Leiser 
U. at L., '69 



Andrew A. Leiser, Jr. 
B. U., 'gS, Yale. '99 



Law OfBces of 
Andrew Albright Leiser 
Andrew Albright Leiser, Jr. 

Lewisburgh, Union County 
Pennsylvania 

H. B. WEAVER, '14 

Catalogs, Yearbooks, House 
Organs. 

THE PITTSBURGH PRINT- 
ING CO. 
530 Fernando St., 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 



G. F. RASSWEILER 

Professor of Public Speaking, 

BUCKNELL UNIV. 

Dramatic Reader, Lecturer, and 
Entertainer. 

Ralph L. Belford, '05 



Attorney -at-Law 



Milton, Pa. 



WM. R. FOLLMER 

ATTORNEY-AT-LAW 
Notary in Office 



Lewisburg 



Pennsylvania 



Jobn F. Winkelblech, '14 
Invest in a Farm! 

E. A. STROUT FARM AGENCY 
Knows the Good Ones, 
Advertises and Sells Them. 
Phone 113R8 Lewisburg, Pa. 



G. G. PAINTER, '17, Secretary Printers of the Alumni Monthly 

Tne Sun Printing Ksf Binding Co., Inc. 

Designers and Producers of 

DISTINCTIVE PRINTING 

Booklets, Catalogues, Direct-by-Mail Advertising, Orrice Forms, Etc. 

Sun Building, WiUiamsport, Pa. 



WHEN IN ATLANTIC CITY 

Remember 

The Chelsea Baptist Church 

is on Atlantic Ave., between 

Brighton and Morris 



It is known as 
"The Stranger's Sabbath Home" 



The Minister, 

THOMAS J. CROSS, D.D., '91 

will be glad to welcome you and the 
service will help you 



Harold C. Edwards,' 1 5 
Attorney-at-Lav\7 

Stroudsburg, Penna. 

Geo. P. Miller, '84 

FIRE INSURANCE 

82 University Ave., Lewisburg, Pa. 



New and Used Motors Phone 

Heavy Construction Calvert 

Rewinding 3573 

The Keystone Electric Co. 

R. K. HOKE, '15 

108 S. Grant St., Baltimore, Md. 

A. Donald Gray, '14 
Landscape Architect 



8120 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, Ohio 



SAFETY SAVES SORROW 

Many Bucknell "Grads" have been wise enough to protect their lives with Aetna Life Insurance, 
their incomes with Aetna Health and Accident Insurance, and their business with Aetna Compen- 
sation Insurance. The Aetna is the largest company in the world writing these lines. 
THE W ILLIAM S. ESSICK General Agency, Union Trust Building, Harrisburg, Pa. "" 

FRED A'. ROCKEY, '12, Agency Manager 



the Monthly ; Patronize Them. These Lewisburg Firms Support 



15 



COLLEGE IIVIV 

Inseparably Linked With Life "On the Hill" 
GOOD EATS AND GOOD TIMES, THE LAW AND PROPHETS OF OUR MENU 



"ON THE QUADRANGLE" 



PAYNE, '09 



Lewisburg Trust 
and Safe Deposit Co. 

Commenced Business 1907. 

CAPITAL $125,000 

SURPLUS AND PROFITS, 87,000 
DEPOSITS 1,025,000 

Your Business 
Solicited, 

Appreciated, 

and Protected 

DANIEL F. GREEN, Treas. 

Renew Your Acquaintance With 

"The Purity Special" Sundae. 

Take home with you a box of our 

HOMEMADE CANDY. 

THE PURITY 
W. A. BLAIR 

FRESH AND SMOKED MEATS 

Wholesaler of Pork, Sausage, etc. 

Fancy and Staple Groceries 

OYSTERS IN SEASON. 

J. FRED ZELLER 

JEWELER and 
OPTOMETRIST 



J. C. REEDY 

Dealer In 

Furniture ana Carpets 

530 Market Street 

THE 

SHIELDS 

Photographic 
Studio 

Distinctive Stationery 

AT 

BAKERS PHARMACY 

DELMAR INN 



A. J. DUNKLE, Prop. 



WAIN lES 

Opposite the Trust Co. 
The Home of 

HOMEMADE ICE CREAM 
Lunchenette and Parlor 

"GRADS". Your Mail Orders for 

Bucknell or Fraternity Felt and 

Leather Goods will receive our 

Prompt and Careful Attention. 

H. F. DONEHOWER 

"Varsity Outfitter" 

W. L. DONEHOWER, '06, Mgr. 

JAS. P. BENNETT 

Local and 
Long Distance Hauling 



Phone 84 



Lewisburg 



University Book 
Store 

Books, Stationery 

and School Supplies 

Mail Orders Promptly 
Attended to 

We Pay Postage 

WE WANT YOUR SHIRTS 

Mail 'em in 
Peerless Laundry 

Thompson, '04. Donehower, '06 

Milton Lewisburg Sunbury 

E. C. NOLL 

THE 
FEED MAN 

DR. E. S. HEISER 

DRUGGIST 
Developing and Printing 

IREY'S 
SHOE STORE 

A. J. Irey, '79. 



Union National Banlt 

Strong Capital and Surplus 

Government Supervision 

Member Federal Reserve 



Employees Acquainted with 
Business and College World. 



SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES 

SAVINGS DEPARTMENT 

TRAVELERS' CHECKS 



John K. Kremer, Cashier. 

RAEZER'S 

V-iasn and Carry Groceries 
Lewisburg and Milton. 

H. J. Nogel & Bro. 

Jeweler and Optometrist 

Le-wisburg, Pennsylvania 

Engraving Watch Repairing 

GRENOBLE BROS. 

University Jewelers 

Exclusive Columbia Agents 



STEININGER CAFE 

Open 6 a. m. to 1.30 a. m. 

Rooms With Hot and Cold Running 

Water 

GEO. E. IRVIN, Mgr. 

Third & Market St., Lewisburg, Pa. 

Herman & Leiser 

Dry Goods, Notions, and 

Ladies' Ready-to- Wear 

Apparel. 



W. C. Walls, 
Pres. 



John W. Bucher, 
Cash. 



The Lewisburg National Bank 

The oldest Bank in Union County. 
Established 1853. Capital 8100,000. 
Surplus and Profits SIOO.OOO. 3% In- 
terest paid on Savings Accounts. 

HILL'S DRUG STORES 

3 Stores 2 
Lewisburg, Penna. 



Transact Your Business In Lewisburg Through Our Advertisers. 



16 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



Bucknell Alumni Organizing 
Million Dollar Corporation 

The Corporation Will Engage in Commercial Banking, Loaning 
on Accounts Receivable to Substantial Manufacturers, Job- 
bers and Wholesalers 



COMMERCIAL ADVANCE CORPORATION 



Capitalization 



.$1,000,000 



20,000 shares of 8% cumulative Preferred Stock, non-assessable. Par value S50.00 per share 

20,000 shares Common Stock no par value. 

The business of the corporation is usually known as Commercial Banking, the advancing of money on open 
accounts, to responsible wholesalers, jobbers and manufacturers, who guarantee the payment thereof. Upon 
receipt of the proper documents 80% of the face value of the account is advanced, the balance being paid only as 
collections are received. Collection of the accounts is in the hands of the company borrowing the money. 

There is a demand for this kind of service far in excess of the ability of the existing companies to supply. 

The profits are exceedingly satisfactory. Existing companies are paying the required dividends on their 
Preferred stock and earning an additional 25% to 35% on their Common Stock. 

Safety is the keynote of the business. Money is advanced only on the best of security to concerns that 
pass a rigid credit examination. 



Ofli 



cers 



LOUIS W. ROBEY, President. 

Alumnus of Bucknell University, Class of '04. 
President of the Overbrook Bank, Phila. 
Director of the Parkwav Trust Co., Phila. 
Head of Real Estate Law, Temple L'niversity, 
Phila. 
NORMAN H. HANNAH, Vice President. 

President of the Northeastern Title and Trust 
Co., Phila. 
FRANK H. TUFT, Vice President. 

Cashier of the American Bank and Trust Co., 
Phila. 



ALEXANDER L. SKILTON, Secretary. 

Vice President of the Northeastern Title and 

Trust Co., Phila. 
Vice President of the Overbrook Bank, Phila. 
WALTER S. WILCOX, Treasurer and General 
Manager. 
Alumnus of Bucknell University, Class of '04. 
For five years Registrar and Business Man- 
ager of Bucknell. 
Treasurer of Richards Manufacturing Corpor- 
ation, Phila. 
Lecturer in Department of Commerce, Temple 
University, Phila. 



Subscription Terms 



One share of Preferred Stock and one share of Common Stock are being sold for a limited time at $60.00 
per block, payable SIO.OO with the subscription, and the balance SIO.OO per month. 
For more complete information address 

WALTER S. WILCOX, Treas., 

201 Fuller Bldg., 10 South 18th St., 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



Invest for Safety and Income. 

Invest with those w^ho are known to you. 

Salesman wanted to sell stock of this corporation. 



Bucknell Alumni Monthly 

Vol. V Lewisburg, Pa., February, 1921 No. 5 

75th Anniversary Commencement, June 11-15 



College Comradeship 



IN the midst of the changes in the general influ- 
ence of a college upon its students through 
changes in educational policy, one element in col- 
lege life remains constant — the element of comrade- 
ship The public is often surprised at the testimony 
of public men of high intellectual character as to the 
value of their college associations. Some .under the 
influence of sentiment put this above that of their 
college discipline. The value of these, however, 
when due allowance is made for sentiment, is very 
great. Comradeship is more than ordinary compan- 
ionship. It represents one's holdings in the stock of 
common ideas and purposes. It represents that 
sense of security and trust which is born of a well 
tried friendship. It represents that spirit which de- 
clares itself in the common response to a call to ad- 
venture or to a summons to duty. Whether so 
recognized or not, it is that underlying and abiding 
element in the college inheritance which makes our 
colleges the recruiting ground for great causes. 

WILLIAM JEWETT TUCKER 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



Buckneil Alumni Monthly 

LEO L. ROCKWELL, '07, 
Editor 
H. S. EVERETT, '12, 
Advertising Manager 

Published monthly during the college 
year by the Buckneil University 
Alumni Association. 

Entered as second-class mail matter 
at the Postoffice at Lewisburg, Pa., 
under the act of Congress, March 3, 
1879. 

Annual subscription to non-members, 
$2.00. 

To life members under the SIO plan, 
$1.50. 

To life members under the new plan, 
it is sent gratis. 

To annual members under the new 
plan, subscription is included in the 
annual dues. 

Checks should be made payable to 
Frank M. Simpson, Treas. 



ALUMNI OPINION 



"COLLEGE COMRADESHIP" 



u 



Prof. F. M. Simpson, 
Dear Prof.: 

Don't know just how I stand and 
whether I am in any way back on 
the books. So I'll let it go at $2.50 
just now. 

Am not just sure whether the "new 
plan" is the best financially. I 
know that we get careless and fail 
to send dues annually when not 
present. 

But unless the life membership is 
well invested and kept intact as a 
fund, I fear the temptation to use 
the money for present needs may be 
too strong, and in the end "the end 
of that man (matter) may be worse 
than the first". — F. 



-\ 



THE PRESENT 

CONSTITUTION 



The title-page quotation from the pen 
of ex-President Tucker, of Dartmouth, 
served as the introduction of an ad- 
dress delivered January 11 by George 
Parmly Day before the Class Agents 
of the Yale alumni. 

The quotation served as text for an 
earnest plea that Yale men make an 
unusual effort this year in raising the 
loyalty fund which they annually con- 
tribute to the university. The plea is 
made necessary by the $500,000 deficit 
which Yale is facing. 

Princeton today is debating the ex- 
pediency of limiting her student-body. 
She sees before her the danger of in- 
creasing it beyond the range of her 
equipment. 

Every worth-while American college 
is confronted today in greater or less 
degree by the same problem as Yale 
and Princeton. With a larger vision 
than ever before of the opportunities 
and responsibilities of their mission, the 
colleges are reduced to the alternative 
of limitation of numbers or expansion 
of equipment. 

In the past, less than one percent of 
the population of the country has en- 
joyed a college education, certainly a 
small enough proportion of highly edu- 
cated citizens in a democracy. In these 
days of conflict of ideals, can America 
afford to have this proportion grow 
even less, by keeping the population of 
our colleges at a standstill while the 
population of the country expands? 

Buckneil must help in answering this 
question, and on Buckneil alumni de- 
pends, very largely, the responsibility 
for her answer. 

The Monthly is happy to surrender 
several pages of this issue to Gradu- 
ate Manager Glass, in order to put be- 
fore the Alumni a detailed and accurate 
statement of the athletic situation. 

Some material crowded out by this 
supplement will appear next month. 



In reply to the communication in 
"Alumni Opinion" as to the disposition 
of the life membership fees, it may be 
said that these are set apart as a per- 
nanent fund. Treasurer Frank M. Simp- 
son, has now a fund of some 82,000 in- 
vested in Liberty Bonds. The annual 
interest from these is for the present 
devoted to the support of the Alumni 
Monthly. No decision has been made 
by the Association as to the final dis- 
position of the fund thus obtained. 

The $25 life membership fees are be- 
ginning to come in. The honor of hav- 
ing been the first to become a life 
member under the new plan belongs to 
F. B. "Dutch" Jaekel, of the class of 
1903. 



PITTSBURGH NOTES 



Edwin P. Griffiths, Esq., '05, 425 
Locust street, Edgewood, Pittsburgh, 
on December 1st, assumed the position 
as Associate Counsel of The Philadel- 
phia Company. 

Elva Coleman, '03 (Mrs. Harry 
Herpel), after living several years in 
Canada, is now located on Park street, 
McKeesport, Pa. 

Earl A. Morton, Esq., '05, Park 
Building, Pittsburgh, announces the ar- 
rival of a new Bucknellian, in the per- 
son of Tom, who arrived November 14, 
1920. Editor's Note: Mort objects to 
"Thomas", and insists upon just "Tom". 

Miss Belle Clark, ex-'05, 5704 Friend- 
ship avenue, Pittsburgh, entertained 
Mrs. Fern Braddock Stevenson, '05, of 
Franklin, Pa., and other Bucknellians, 
over the Christmas Holidays. 

Samuel Black, '06, and wife (Lucretia 
Snyder, '06), and two daughters, Mar- 
garet R. and Rebecca J., have for the 
past nine months been located at 5800 
Hobart street, Pittsburgh. Mr. Black 
is President of the Penn-Oklahoma Oil 
Company. They have spent the last 
fourteen years at Upper Sandusky and 
Columbus, Ohio, and Franklin, Penn- 
sylvania. 

® 

New Pittsburgh Secretary 

Helge Florin, '09, 821 Frick Building, 
Pittsburgh, has been elected the new 
secretary of the Alumni Club. "Chick" 
takes the place of John T. Shirley, 
ex-'09, who was compelled to resign be- 
cause of the pressure of other duties. 



Since several of the Alumni are in- 
quiring as to the present organization 
of the Alumni Association, we judge it 
worth while to print the present Con- 
stitution, as adopted in 1918, and 
amended to date. 

Article 1. Name 
Section 1. This corporation shall be 
called the General Alumni Association 
of Buckneil University. 

Article 2. Members 
Section 1. Any person who shall have 
received from the University a degree in 
course, or an honorary degree, shall be 
a member of the Association. But only 
those who have paid the life member- 
ship fee, or the annual dues, shall be 
eligible to vote and to hold office. The 
Ufe membership fee shall be ten dollars, 
the annual dues, one dollar. 
Article 3. Officers, Committees and 

Their Duties 
. Section 1. The officers of this As- 
sociation shall be a President, a Secre- 
tary, and a Treasurer. 

Section 2. There shall be a Board of 
Managers consisting of the President 
and Secretary and five additional mem- 
bers. Two of these members shall re- 
side in Lewisburg. 

Section 3. All business pertaining to 
the Association that is not provided for 
in the Constitution, shall be performed 
by the Board of Managers. 

Section 4. The Secretary shall be 
elected for two years and shall be a 
resident of Lewisburg. 

Section 5. The Treasurer shall be ap- 
pointed by the Board of Managers to 
serve two years. He shall be a resident 
of Lewisburg. His duties shall be to 
collect the life membership fees and the 
annual dues and to act as custodian of 
the funds. He shall give a bond, the 
amount of which shall be determined by 
the Board of Managers, and the pre- 
mium on the bond shall be paid by the 
Board of Managers. 

Section 6. The Board of Managers 
shall appoint a committee on Necrology 
and the committee to conduct the elec- 
tion of the Alumni Representative on 
the Board of Trustees when such elec- 
tion is required, according to the reso- 
lution on the minutes of the Alumni As- 
sociation. 

Article 4. Meetings 

Section 1. There shall be an annual 
business meeting and an annual Anni- 
versary meeting. 

Article 5. Quorum 

Section 1. A majority of the Board 
of Managers at a meeting of the Board 
or twenty voting members at the an- 
nual business meeting shall constitute a 
quorum. 

Article 6 

This constitution may be altered, 
amended, or suspended by a vote of 
two-thirds of the members present. 

«- -Jr * 

At the meeting last June the consti- 
tution was amended to the effect that 
annual membership dues should be 
S2.50, and the life-membership fee S25.00. 

The privilege of membership was ex- 
tended also to matriculates of the col- 
lege, and associate membership was 
granted to faculty members not gradu- 
ates of the University. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



About the Hill 



Dr. Harris Recovers From Illness 



HILL AND BURG 



Professor Howard Dies Suddenly 



President Emeritus John H. Harris, 
who was taken suddenly ill on January 
9, just too late for mention in the Janu- 
ary Monthly, returned home January 
29 from the Geisinger Hospital, where 
he had been under treatment during the 
three weeks intervening. He is recover- 
ing rapidly. 

Dr. Harris was taken with a sudden 
attack on Tuesday morning. For years 
he had suffered intermittently from 
hernia, but this seizure was so severe 
that an immediate operation was 
thought advisable, and he was taken at 
once to the Geisinger Hospital. Here 
though it was discovered that his con- 
dition was not so serious as had been 
feared, he was operated on Wednesday 
morning. The operation was entirely 
successful, and Dr. Harris convalesced 
very rapidly, feeling himself able to re- 
turn home a week after the operation. 
But his surgeons advised against so 
speedy a removal, and he remained at 
the hospital until January 29. 

Since his return his improvement has 
been consistent, and he has been meet- 
ing his classes since February 1. The 
Alumni will join the college-body in 
felicitating him on his rapid recovery. 
® 

"Mac" McDermott Recovering 



Shortly before Christmas it was learn- 
ed that "Mac" McDermott, Varsity 
right end, who had been out of the line- 
up since the Lafayette game, who in- 
deed played that game with a high 
fever, was suffering from tubercular 
trouble. Upon inquiry by Prof. C. A. 
Lindemann, at the Geisinger Hospital, 
where "Mac" had been undergoing 
treatment, it was learned that a so- 
journ at Saranac Lake would probably 
mean complete recovery. Senior Coun- 
cil took favorable action upon a reso- 
lution to establish a fund to send him 
to Saranac as the guest of the student 
body. Students and faculty joined in 
the movement. 

The gift was to be in recognition of 
"Mac's" record as a "iirst-class fighting 
man", not only on the gridiron, but on 
the fields of France, where "Mac" was 
awarded the Distinguished Service 
Cross for bravery in action. 

After the fund was well under way, 
and nearly SoOO had been raised, with 
several groups still to report, it was 
learned that the diagnosis had been 
faulty, and that "Mac" was on the 
high road to recovery. There is gen- 
eral rejoicing over the good news, as 
MacDermott is recognized as one of the 
out-standing men of the present stu- 
dent-body. 

® 



Eben N. Swope is with J. S. Rogers 
Co., Building Contractors, at Moores- 
town, N. J. He is married and has one 
child. ^ 



As a result of the plea made by State 
Y. M. C. A. Secretary Miller, shortly 
before Christmas, the faculty and stu- 
dent-body made a contribution of $200 
to the European Student Relief Fund. 

May Peterson, soprano of the Metro- 
politan Opera Co., who opened the 
Artists' Course given under the auspices 
of Mu Phi Epsilon, was greeted by a 
crowded house January 14. 

Dr. AUyn K. Foster, of the Depart- 
ment of Student Work, of the Northern 
Baptist Education Board, spent the 
week of January 10, at the hill. Dr. 
Foster, speaking several time daily be- 
fore various groups of the student-body, 
and holding individual conferences with 
many at the hill and the Women's Col- 
lege, got close to the students and made 
a distinct contribution to the spiritual 
life of the college. 

At Dr. Foster's address before the 
Y. M. C. A. President Hunt announc- 
ed that he had been so fortunate as to 
secure Sherwood Eddy for a three-days' 
visit later in the year, March 8-10. 

Miss Anne W. Galbraith, '07, an edi- 
tor with the Williamsport Grit, address- 
ed the students of Journalism, Janu.ary 
20. 

Dr. S. C. Schmucker, of West Chester 
S. N. S., was the second speaker on the 
Y. M. C. A. lecture course. He lectured 
on prison reform. 

Dr. and Mrs. William E. Martin re- 
cently celebrated the fortieth anniver- 
sary of their wedding. 

Judge Albert W. Johnson presided in 
the Snyder County Court during Janu- 
ary. 

Professors N. F. Davis and N. H. 
Stewart and their Assistants explored 
the vicinity of Lewisburg, on January 
14, for winter birds. They saw fifteen 
varieties: English sparrows, song spar- 
rows, tree sparrows, juncos, cardinal 
grosbeak, tufted titmouse, chickadee, 
downy woodpecker, crow, English star- 
ling, white-breasted nuthatch, long-ear- 
ed owl, Cooper's hawk, and horned 
lark. 

The "Bucknell Directory", a pamphlet 
with the names, addresses, and tele- 
phone numbers of the faculty, student 
body, fraternities, map of Lewisburg, 
athletic schedules, songs, and several il- 
lustrations of things about the hill, is a 
new appearance at the hill this year. 
It is published by D. W. Davis and H. 
G. Florin of the junior class. 

S. Perry Rogers, '22, of Jeffersonville, 
has been elected Assistant Editor of the 
Bucknellian. 

Student Government of the Women's 
College, after having re-elected the old 
set of officers, reconsidered its action on 
plea of the unwillingness of the officers 
to serve a second term. 

® 

Miss Helen R. Martin, ex-'20, is an 
invalid at the Grandview Sanitarium, 
Oil City, Pa. 



Professor Mortimer Howard, for the 
past two years instructor in voice in 
the School of Music, died Sunday after- 
noon, February 6, after a short illness. 

Professor Howard was born in 1863, 
at North Brookfield, Massachusetts. He 
began the study of music at an early 
age. He first sang in the LInitarian 
Church at Springfield, Mass. Later he 
studied with Emilio Bellari, and ob- 
tained a position as tenor soloist at the 
First Presbyterian Church of Pitts- 
burgh. Upon the resignation of Evan 
Williams as tenor soloist at the Mar- 
ble Collegiate Church of New York, Mr. 
Howard was elected to fill his place. 
From New York he went to Waterbury, 
Conn., to teach singing at the same 
time in the Arlington Street Church of 
Boston. In 1915 he went to Nova 
Scotia, where he remained until the 
fall of 1919, when he came to Bucknell. 

Professor Howard suffered a paralytic 
stroke Saturday evening, February 5, 
and died the following afternoon. 

Brief funeral services were held Mon- 
day afternoon, prior to sending the 
body to his old home in Massachusetts. 

His loss will be mourned by the en- 
tire college, and more especially by the 
members of the Music School faculty 
and student body, with whom he was 
very popular. 

® 

Edwards, '10, Leaves 

Connellsville, Pa. 



The Rev. J. Earle Edwards, '10, who 
has been widely known because of his 
success in pushing the New World 
Movement in the Connellsville Baptist 
Church, has resigned his pastorate to 
accept the position of promotion secre- 
tary with the New Yorld Movement of 
the state of New Jersey. 

Coming to Connellsville just shortly 
before the opening of the campaign last 
spring, Mr. Edwards was so successful 
in organizing the spiritual and material 
resources of his church that it raised 
over $70,000 for the New World Move- 
ment. 

He has been notably successful in in- 
troducing modern business methods in- 
to his church work without cheapening 
or lowering the spiritual appeal. 

In the past ten months forty new 
members have been added to his church 
Each new member has applied for mem- 
bership on a card which reads: "Being 
in entire sympathy with the aims of 
the First Baptist Church of Connells- 
ville to place Christ first in every life, 
and to help make a new world of 
brotherhood and unselfish service, be- 
ginning with me as one of its members, 
I hereby make application for mem- 
bership. If accepted I pledge the re- 
sources of my personality, time and 
means, to carry out this program". 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



A •»•»•-•»•>.•■ 



-•-•-•«•»•• »*• 



In the Public Eye 



**• ^M»M>»«>M#M>»| 



Hassrick, '06, Addresses 

Welfare Workers 



Romain C. Hassrick, '06, addressed a 
conference of welfare workers held Jan- 
uary 14, at the call of Director Tustin, 
to consider the problem of caring for 
feeble-minded service men now at large 
and uncared for. 

Mr. Hassrick urged cooperation be- 
tween city and governmental agencies to 
care for these men, at the same time 
weeding out fakers and shammers. 

He said: "There are three classes of 
cases in which this committee is ask- 
ed to interest itself. The first, and most 
important, is that of the bona fide dis- 
abled veteran, who because of various 
postponements, hitches and delays, has 
found himself with no place to sleep and 
nothing to eat. 

"Then there is the 'pan-handling' 
veteran who travels about large cities, 
and demands hand-outs. 

"Then there is the class of mentally 
deficient former service men, who has 
escaped from some government hospital 
or who has for some reason been re- 
leased from a government institution 
and who is still in a mentally defective 
condition". 

Mr. Hassrick showed the necessity of 
distinguishing between these classes and 
caring for each as it deserved. 
® 

Potter, '07, Urges Disarmament 

The New York World of January 10, 
in a two-column, front page story, feat- 
ures a sermon preached the previous 
day by the Rev. Charles Francis Potter, 
'07, at Earl Hall, Columbia University, 
in which he urged gradual disarmament, 
with the United States leading the way. 

He said in part: "A campaign of 
friendship is cheaper than a campaign 
of hate, but it must be sincere, it must 
be service-rendering, it must be patient, 
persistent and prolonged. There are no 
short-cuts to Utopia. 

"The one to make the start is the 
United States, because we are admit- 
tedly the people best able to continue 
the race toward sea and land and air 
supremacy, and therefore, are not open 
to the charge of wanting to end the 
game for fear of being beaten". 



-®- 



MacNaul, '90, An Editor 

Willard C. MacNaul, '90, of Chicago, 
is Managing Editor of the "Westcenter 
Chicagoan", a community newspaper 
committed to the task of fostering the 
"love of neighborhood" of the West- 
center district of Chicago. 

The publication is well along in its 
first volume, and both its news columns 
and its editorial comment, devoted as 
they are to the local interests of this 
particular district, are calculated to 
foster community spirit and serve local 
business interests, as they aim to do. 
It is a most creditable representative of 
this new type of big-city journalism. 



Dr. Batten Pleads For 

Industrial Peace 



Dr. Samuel Zane Batten, '85, chair- 
man of the committee on industrial 
relations of the Philadelphia Federation 
of Churches, in an open letter, recently 
published in the press of Philadelphia, 
urges employers to "scrutinize carefully 




any movement, however plausible, 
which is likely to result in denying to 
the workers such affiliation as will, in 
their judgment, best safeguard their in- 
terests and promote their welfare". He 
brands contracts which require the 
worker to pledge himself against af- 
filiation with a union as unfair and in- 
imical to economic freedom. 

® 



"Matty's" Christmas Surprise 

The Literary Digest of January 15, in 
a page article entitled "Matty's Tribute 
From The Fans", tells of the tremen- 
dous response to a suggestion that the 
"fans" throughout the country send the 
great pitcher Christmas cards in token 
of their interest in his fight for health. 
The Digest states: "Cards poured in 
from men in all walks of life, testify- 
ing to the sincere sympathy and ad- 
miration of the fans". 

The Digest explains the spontaneity 
of this remembrance by saying that "to 
the mind of the enthusiast Matty em- 
bodies the ideal player, and stands for 
all the best things in the game, not 
only as a pitcher, but as a clean, right- 
living man". It quotes the well-known 
sports-writer, Hugh Fullerton, as say- 
ing that Matty occupies a niche in base- 
ball no other man ever did, and per- 
haps no other man will. 



-®- 



Professor Lose Banqueted 

Professor Charles Lose, matriculate of 
the class of 1883, an honorary Master of 
Arts of Bucknell, father of Heny J. 
Lose, ex-'06, James Lose, '08, and 
Charles Lose, Jr., '11, for many years a 
prominent Pennsylvania educator, being 
in turn principal of Muncy Normal 
School, superintendent of Lycoming 
County, superintendent of the schools 
of Williamsport, and principal of Lock 
Haven Normal, was banqueted by his 
friends at the Community House in 
Williamsport on the evening of Feb- 
ruary 3. 

Two hundred and fifty guests were 
present at the dinner, which was charac- 
terized by expressions of personal af- 
fection for Mr. Lose, and of appreciation 
for his notable record in education. 

J. George Becht, First Deputy Super- 
intendent of Public Instruction of Penn- 
sylvania, and Doctor of Science of 
Bucknell, presided, and many other 
Buckuellians were present, among them 
Professor E. M. Heim, '93; the Rev. W. 
W. Kelchner, '86; Dr. F. D. Koch, '99; 
Dr. Frederick W. Robbins, '98; Profes- 
sor S. B. Dunlap, '03; Professor A. M. 
Weaver, '04; Professor Frank H. Paint- 
er, '10, and "Jim" Lose, '08. 

® 

Hyatt Heads Lycoming Lawyers 

John T. Hyatt, Esq., of Jersey Shore, 
a graduate of the college, of the class of 
1891, later a vice-consul in Cuba, and 
for some time a well-known attorney 
of Jersey Shore, was chosen by the Ly- 
coming Bar Association, at its January 
meeting, to preside over the organiza- 
tion for the coming year. 

This is the first time that the Asso- 
ciation has elected as President an at- 
torney residing outside of the city of 
Williamsport. 

At the same meeting, Oliver J. Deck- 
er, '99, was elected Secretary of the As- 
sociation. 

® 

Murdock Honor Guest 



William J. Murdock, ex-'05, was, with 
Governor Sproul, a guest of honor at 
the banquet of Garret Cochran Post No. 
1, American Legion, at Williamsport, 
January 20. 

More than five hundred ex-service 
men gathered at Community House to 
welcome the chief executive of the State 
and the State Adjutant of the Legion, 
representatives being present from 
many Lycoming County towns. 
® 

WEDDINGS 



Elizabeth Stephens is now a teacher 
of physical culture, residing at 5 Fifth 
street, Scotia, N. Y. 



Dyer-Hopper 
Ralph Miller Dyer was married June 
16, 1920, to Miss Velma Hopper, of 
Fisher's Ferry. The ceremony was per- 
formed by Dr. John H. Harris. The 
ceremony was kept secret, being an- 
nounced in January, 1921. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



Personals 



..•»•..•..•..••••»•••< 



»«..a..«..«»«»«..»»*»«»«..«»c>.«..a»a»«»9»«»i 



-•"••••••••**»»««»«»»»*»«..»««..«»«..«»«„«.,t»*« 



1863 
Dr. Owen P. Eaches has an article 
in the Watchman Examiner of Janu- 
ary 3rd, entitled "A Justifiable Intol- 
erance". 

1871 
George N. Lefevre is a farmer at 
Strasburg, Pa. 

John H. Wingert is President of the 
Union County Farm Bureau, and pre- 
sided at the recent meeting. 
1873 
The present address of John W. 
Hague, of this class, is desired by the 
Alumni Ofifice. 

1875 
Dr. D. L. McKinney, ex-'75, is located 
at Sioux Falls, S. D. 
1876 
Harry W. Henderson, ex-'76, is located 
at 1519 California avenue, Bakersfield, 
Cal. 

Mrs. Florence Dean Walter, Institute, 
'76, resides at Dalton, Pa. 
1879 
Mrs. James A. VanVoast, Institute, 
'79, resides at 1319 Union street, Sche- 
nectady, N. Y. She has been active in 
women's work and was the first woman 
in the city appointed to political office, 
being made a member of the Board of 
Public Welfare in 1914. 
1880 
Prof. William G. Owens is busy with 
articles and lectures on Japan. A re- 
cent article in the Watchman Ex- 
aminer is entitled "Was the Tokio Con- 
vention a Success?" 

Dr. S. Lewis Ziegler is devoting much 
time and energy to the plans for the 
campus extension at Bucknell. 
1882 
The Rev. Robert M. Hunsicker is 
now located at New Britain, Pa. 
1883 
Mr. Charles E. Stein deserves the 
thanks of the Alumni for his contribu- 
tion of ice to the Alumni Association, 
last Commencement, for which he re- 
cently sent a receipted bill to the As- 
sociation. 

The Rev. Benjamin Herr, ex-'83, is 
pastor of the Fort Edward Village Bap- 
tist Church, Fort Edward, N. Y. 

Newton B. Williams, ex-'83, now re- 
sides at Banning, California. 
1884 
Director Ernest L. Tustin announced 
recently that he will establish a sum- 
mer camp for 100 children at Holmes- 
burg. 

Dr. Frank Goodchild has a sermon 
in the Watchman Examiner of Janu- 
ary 6th. 

Anne F. Williams, Institute, '84, at 
present resides at Long Beach, Cal. 
1886 
Dr. William C. Stinson, '86, is with 
the American Red Cross at Ringoes, 
N.J. 

1888 
The Rev. H. J. Roberts, ex-'88, has 
been since July 1, 1916, pastor of the 



Jaekel Purchases 

Doylestown Paper 

F. B. Jaekel, '03, has purchased the 
"Doylestown Democrat", one of the old- 
est daily and weekly newspapers in 
Pennsylvania, according to a recent dis- 
patch in the Philadelphia Press. The 




"Democrat" is more than a hundred 
years old, and one of the best-known 
of the papers of that section. 

Mr. Jaekel is well prepared to enter 
the newspaper publishing business, hav- 
ing done a great deal of journalistic 
work, both on the daily press and in 
the magazine field. 

In recent years Mr. Jaekel has been 
managing his estate, "Glen Echo 
Farms", at Doylestown. 

First Baptist Church, of Sunnyvale, 
Cal. 

President Lincoln Hulley, of Stetson 
University, spent part of the summer 
with his daughter, Harriet, who is an 
instructor at the University of Min- 
nesota. She is the mother of Anne 
Hulley Jackson, born last summer. Dr. 
Hulley was recently in Harrisburg to 
consult his classmate. Dr. Harvey 
Smith, of Harrisburg, for advice con- 
cerning a minor ailment. 
1889 

The Rev. Dr. J. W. Neuman, ex-'89, is 
pastor of the First Baptist Church at 
Missouri Valley, Iowa. He has spent 
more than thirty years of continuous 
service as a pastor. Since leaving Buck- 
nell he has received the degrees of 
Ph.B., B.D., and Ph.D. 

Judge Lincoln S. Walter made an elo- 
quent plea in behalf of the defendant 
at the recent Dauberman murder trial 
in the Union County Courts. 
1892 

Clayton Bennett, ex-'92, is Executive 
Secretary of the Board of Arizona State 
Institutions, residing at 334 North Sec- 
ond avenue, Phoenix Arizona. The re- 
cent death of Mrs. Bennett is reported 
in another column. 

1893 

John H. Foresman is president of the 



City Building and Loan Association at 
Williamsport. 

Prof. Edwin C. Maxey, formerly of 
the University of Nebraska, is now in 
care of Dr. F. A. Snyder, 1115 South 
20th street, Lincoln, Nebraska. 

1894 

Jessie Wheeler Armstrong is slowly 
recovering from a long illness. Her 
husband recently had the unusual honor 
of having a genus of fossil sponges 
named for him, — Armstrongia Oryx. 
This is the third undescribed fossil of 
sponge he has found in Erie County. 

The address of Frederick Otto Schub, 
of the class of 1894, is desired by the 
Alumni Office. 

The Rev. Theodore Heysham, ex-'94, 
of Norristown, at the invitation of the 
Church and Academy, delivered at Fac- 
toryville his interesting and instruc- 
tive lecture "The Birth of the Bible", 
on January 13th. On the next evening 
he gave his recital of Ben Hur, illustrat- 
ed with sixty colored stereoptican 
slides. 

Prof. F. R. Strayer resides at 11 Prim- 
rose avenue. Mount Vernon, N. Y. 
1895 

B. Meade Wagenseller resides at 828 
Sixty-fifth avenue, Oaklane, Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

The Rev. T. Carson Hanna, formerly 
pastor of the Pottsville Baptist Church, 
has recently accepted the pastorate of 
the Sunbury Baptist Church, resigning 
his Pottsville charge. Mr. Hanna, who 
is a grandson of Adoniram Judson, has 
been active in Pottsville in many kinds 
of public work. 

1896 

Lewis H. Ryon, ex- '96, now has offices 
407 Bulletin Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Dr. Henry T. Colestock has signed 
up with the Swarthmore Chautauqua 
Association as Superintendent. He has 
not been assigned his territory yet. Dr. 
Colestock, together with Prof. Rass- 
wei'er. Professor of Oratory at the Uni- 
versity, served on the lecture platform 
last summer. 

The Rev. Elmer E. Hall, pastor of 
the Baptist Church at Cedarville, N. J., 
has been stricken with paralysis. He 
had been ill for several months with 
heart disease. His condition is report- 
ed as serious. 

Milton Loeb, ex-'96, is proprietor of 
the Gem Jewelry Shop at 309 Wood- 
ward avenue, Detroit, Mich. His resi- 
dence is 5015 Bruch street. 

Dr. Robert F. Trainer, ex-'96, has 
been appointed a captain in the Medi- 
cal Corps of the National Guard. 

Leander W. Baldwin can now be ad- 
dressed % The Literary Digest, New 
York, N. Y. 

Charles Firth is now acting President 
and Dean of Grand Island College, and 
head of the Department of History. 
His address is Grand Island, Neb. 
1897 

Hon. John V. Lesher, of Sunbury, is 

a member of the House , Agricultural 

' Committee, which has had under con- 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



PERSONALS 



sideration the famous Kenyon-Ken- 
drick-Gronna bill for regulating the 
meat packing industry. 

The new address of Mrs. Kate God- 
dard Jones will be Sianfu, Shensi, 
China. 

Rev. A. S. Earner may be addressed 
% The Baptist Church, Los Angeles, 
Cal. 

1899 

George L. Reese, ex-'99, may be ad- 
dressed at 206 Lenox Road, Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 

Mrs. Bertha Watkins Bridge is now 
residing at 910 Marshall Field Annex, 
Chicago, 111. 

Mrs. George W. Murdock, nee Clar- 
issa L. Fowler, ex-'99, is residing at 
2665 Columbia avenue, Detroit, Mich. 
1900 

Mrs. Mabel Wheeler Rommerdale is 
residing at Conneautville, Crawford 
County, Pa. Her husband is superin- 
tendent of construction of a subsidiary 
plant of the Burke Electric Co. 

The Rev. A. W. Anderson is now re- 
siding in Easton, at 709 Ferry street. 
He formerly was pastor of the Baptist 
Church at Southhampton, Pa. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thornton M. Shork- 
ley are now residing at Tidioute, Pa. 
Mrs. Shorkley, before her marriage, was 
Genevieve White. 

1901 

Mr. J. O. Hackenburg can be address- 
ed % The Pennsylvania Railroad Co., 
Reading, Pa. 

Rev. Charles W. Wolfe is now resid- 
ing at Clayton, 111. 

Gottlieb L. Freudenberger has moved 
from Philadelphia to Tamaqua, Pa. 

Elmer Myers is secretary of Yank- 
ton College, Yankton, S. D. 
1904 

Charles T. Shepard, ex-'04, is residing 
at 121 East Webster avenue, Roselle 
Park, N. J. 

The address of Grace B. Lesher is de- 
sired by the Alumni Office. 

Walter S. Wilcox, while enroute from 
Altoona to Philadelphia, paid the col- 
lege a visit. He also stopped off at his 
parents' home in Canton. 
1905 

Ray Preston Bowen is residing at 531 
Ostiom avenue, Syracuse, N. Y. He is 
Associate Professor of Romance Lan- 
guages in Syracuse University. 

George W. CockiU spent the latter 
part of January with his family in 
Lewisburg. 

William L. Dentler, ex-'05, resides at 
1732 Brighton Road, Pittsburgh. 

Dr. L. W. Hainer, of the Calvary 
Baptist Church at Norristown, who is 
away from his church on account of ill- 
ness, is improving, to the delight of his 
people. Dr. John Gordon, the stated 
supply, is rendering excellent service in 
Dr. Hainer's absence. The installation 
of a new lighting system and the re- 
decorating have increased the attrac- 
tiveness of the church. 
1906 

The pastorate of Rev. J. Wallace 
Green, at the Tacony Church, is open- 
ing with encouraging signs. Several 
substantial new members have been re- 
ceived, and the entire church is loyally 
supporting its new pastor. 



L 



IF 

You like to read these Personals, 
You wish there were more of 'em, 
You know some news about Harry, 
You think Jim'd like to know 

WHY DON'T YOU 

GETBUSYANDSENDITTOUS 

QUICK? 

Alumni News Item 

Class 19 

Name 

Item 

Reported by 



Samuel J. Black, ex-'06, is president 
of the Pennsylvania-Oklahoma Oil Cor- 
poration, with offices at 230 Fifth ave- 
nue, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Romain C. Hassrick has moved his 
offices to 1023 Land Title Building, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Dr. Amos Barton resides at 761 East 
31st street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
1907 

S. Homer Smith, who is at present 
teaching at the West Philadelphia High 
School, is also teaching Real and Per- 
sonal Property at Temple University. 
He resides at 1006 South 56th street. 

Ernest M. Gress has been assigned 
as one of the men to represent the 
state at the Meeting of the National 
Association for the advancement of Ag- 
ricultural Science at Chicago. They 
will discuss what Pennsylvania has 
been doing. Mr. Gress will make ob- 
servations in Western states regarding 
their seed laws. Extensive preparations 
for the testing of seeds have been under 
way for some time. At the present time 
Mr. Gress is State Botanist for Penn- 
sylvania. 

W. W. Raker has made his new head- 
quarters at 417 West 123rd street. New 
York, N. Y. 

Robert W. Baker lives in Philadel- 
phia, residing at 1232 South 45th street. 

Jonathan Wolfe now resides at 507 
East 60th street, Chicago, 111. 

Spencer T. Harris is spending some 
time in Lewisburg. Mr. Harris, hearing 
of the sudden illness of his father, im- 
mediately made preparations for a trip 
to the east. 

1908 

Miss Laura McGann now resides at 
2400 Second avenue, Altoona, Pa. She 
is teaching in Altoona. 

C. C. Hindraan has been elected to 
the Oregon State Legislature. His of- 
fices are in the Gas Company Building, 
Portland, Oregon. 

Roger S. Parry, ex-'OS, has been prac- 
ticing medicine at Washington, Pa., for 
the last ten years. He has a very large 
practice. During the war Mr. Parry 
was promoted to the rank of a Captain 
in the Medical Corps. Mrs. Parry was 
a graduate of the School of Music. She 
was Fannie Logan, of the class of '06, 
Music. 



Helen Forest Hershey is now residing 
at 901 Lawrence street, Chicago, 111. 

Wallace W. Ridge, ex-'08, is living at 
912 Spruce street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

H. C. Gardner resides at 424 North 
4th street, Stillwater, Minn. 
1909 

Eugene L. Martin is a bond salesman, 
residing at Carlisle, Pa. 

Charles Mallery, '09, is a lawyer in 
.A.ltoona, having offices in the Elder 
Building. 

The Philadelphia and Reading Rail- 
way has announced the appointment of 
Charles J. Lepperd, 'OS, formerly super- 
visor at CoatesvUle, as supervisor at 
Pottstown. 

Harry M. Walter is Manager of Pro- 
duction of the Charles Ewen Johnson 
Co., of Philadelphia. He lives at 40 East 
Benedict avenue. South Ardmore, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 

Mrs. Robert MacMince, nee Mabel 
Russell, ex- '09, resides at 572 Coal street, 
Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

Edna Meacham is at Cornell taking 
up work in Physics for a Ph.D. degree. 

Evan D. Roser, ex-'09, now resides at 
145 Audubon avenue. New York, N. Y. 

Many of the stories of Ida Williams 
Rea will be found in the Youth's Com- 
panion. 

1910 

Max Wiant, Pastor of the First 
Church of Reading, acted as Moderator 
at the ordination of Mrs. Margaret M. 
Joshua, the first woman to be ordained 
to the Baptist ministry in Pennsyl- 
vania. 

C. A. Butt now resides at 107 Wilson 
avenue, Newark, N. J. 

Dr. Raymond Fisher Hain is now 
practicing medicine in Seattle, Wash- 
ington. He is a graduate of Johns 
Hopkins University. 

George C. Fetter is preaching at Mt. 
Carroll, 111. 

Raymond Eastwood has moved from 
Harrisburg, and now resides on High- 
land avenue, Palmyra, N. J. 
1911 

Eleanor G. Raup is taking a course 
in Household Science and Arts at Pratt 
Institute, Brooklyn, New York, special- 
izing in Design. 

■ E. A. Snyder is Chief Chemist for the 
General Electric Co., at Pittsfield, 
Mass. 

Clarence K. Pugh may be addressed 
at 1701 North St. Paul street, Balti- 
more, Md. 

1912 

Mrs. Maze Callahan Houseknecht is 
returning to her home in Montoursville, 
where her husband is planning to go in- 
to business. 

Daniel M. Wise is in the Transmission 
Department of the American Telephone 
and Telegraph Co, and is located at 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

Fred Lange can be addressed % Con- 
so'idated Engineering Co., Baltimore, 
Md. 

1913 

Louis C. Seabright, ex-'13, is engineer 
for the Colby Merrill Co., of Cleveland, 
Ohio. 

Perry Caris, who is a teacher in the 
West Philadelphia High School also 
teaches Analytics at Girard College. He 

(Continued on Page Twelve) 



ATHLETIC SUPPLEMENT 

OF THE BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 
February, 1921 



LOYALTY 



Loyalty is a refinement of interest, 
and interest is developed by a continu- 
ous acquaintance with events and per- 
sons. When one changes his occupa- 
tions and surroundings, it is remark- 
able how quickly the rush of affairs can 
relegate his former interest to the back- 
ground, and relax the boiids of senti- 
ments which bound him to old asso- 
ciations. Even sentiment for one's 
Alma Mater and his cherished asso- 
ciations will succumb to this tendency, 
to live for the present and forget the 
past, if acquaintance with its life and 
members is allowed to lapse. Commit- 
ted as we are to the belief that the 
future progress of Bucknell is almost en- 
tirely dependent on the loyalty and 
energy of her alumni, it has been our 
desire to keep her sons and daughters 
constantly informed of the activities 
and accomplishments of the various 
teams and individuals in the athletic de- 
partment, to the end that intimate ac- 
quaintance thus developed shall not 
only preserve, but increase their loyalty 
and interest. Accordingly, develop- 
ments have faithfully been reported 
from time to time in the public press, 
and the college publications. But it is 
evident from frequent inquiries that 
these reports are viewed as isolated in- 
cidents, and therefore it seems very ap- 
proprite at this time to present a brief, 
but comprehensive review of the ath- 
letic activities of the first semester of 
this college year. 

As the opening day of school drew 
near, and our thoughts and specula- 
tions turned to the football prospects it 
was very evident that Bucknell was to 
enjoy a very propitious season in that 
sport. The previous season had been a 
great success. The team which Mr. C. 
W. P. Reynolds, of Syracuse, had de- 
veloped from a squad of unusual 
strength, due to- the return to college of 
many ex-service men, had made a record 
which commanded the respect of foot- 
ball fandom. An excellent record had 
been made. Mr. Reynolds has been re- 
engaged to control our football fortunes. 
Only three of the 1919 regulars had been 
lost by graduation. Captain Kostos, 
Mangan, McDermott, Wargo, of the 
Class of '21, and Bowser, Bihl, Morrett, 
Homan, Hahn, Morgan, Lauster, Day- 
hofl, Julian, Dietrich, and Gdaniec, of 
the c'ass of '23, all men of known 
ability and experienced in Coach Reyn- 
old's style of play, were on hand to form 
the nucleus of the 1920 team. In ad- 
dition to these, a splendid array of ma- 
terial was available in the incoming 
class. Reed, the star of Lewisburg High 
School, Jemison, of Peddi Institute, 
Wilsbach. of Harrisburg Tech.. Butler, 
of Clearfield High School, Hall, of 
Shamokin High School, Bellach, of New 
York Military Academy, Szorc, of the 
Polish National Alliance College, Perk- 
ins, of Detroit High school, Dooley, of 
Saloway High School, and many others, 
all gave promise of adding new luster 
to the football fame of old Bucknell. It 
was no wonder that our hopes ran high 



with a coach of Mr. Reynold's calibre, 
and such a squad of men. 

The practice was begun on September 
13th, with almost sixty men in uniform. 
The slogan from the beginning was 
"Beat Penn". It seemed like our golden 
opportunity to do it. Penn's stocks ran 
rather low. A new coach was taking 
charge, and his material was not extra- 
ordinary. We hoped to be able to over- 
come the handicap of a shorter period 
for preparation, and a trip before the 
game, because we had a veteran aggre- 
gation, and an established system of 
play. Even the Philadelphia papers de- 
cided the odds in our favor. The day 
of the game arrived all too soon. A 
crowd of eighteen thousand swarmed 
into the stands of Franklin field to wit- 
ness the contest. It was a gruelling 
battle. If it had been decided on statis- 
tics, our expectations of victory would 
have been realized. But it was our 
first encounter, and our men were too 
self confident and timid. The breaks 
went against us. After outplaying them 
during a'most the entire game, one slip 
netted them their only touchdown, and 
the seven to nothing victory. 

The disappointment of this defeat 
was allayed somewhat by an over- 
whelming victory over Ursinus in the 
seccnd game of the season, and all eyes 
turned expectantly toward the Navy. 
But again our team was not quite equal 
to the occasion, although they did score 
on the middies, and had the satisfaction 
of carrying on an almost equal battle, 
with a very high classed eleven. 

After this game the team took a more 
definite form, and great success accom- 
panied their efforts until the Lafayette 
game, on November 6th. This was our 
greatest disappointment. The team, ac- 
companied bv hundreds of supporters, 
journeyed to Easton, in full expectation 
of bringing home the bacon. But again 
the fates were against us. Lafayette, 
represented by a fine array of men, 
fousrht with every ounce of strength 
during every minute of the game, and 
the final whist'e left her master of the 
fituation by the narrow margin of one 
field goal. 

The rest of our opponents were met 
and conquered without any difficulty, 
and the season ended as a convincing 
testimony of the strength of the team, 
in spite of the three defeats. The team 
scored a total of two hundred and forty- 
five points to thirty-seven, scored 
against them. Judging by this record 
there must have been a greater degree 
of difference between Bucknell and her 
opponents this year than ever before, 
for that is the highest number of points 
that any Bucknell team has ever scored 
in on» season, and also the lowest num- 
ber that had ever been scored against 
her. The record of the season is as fol- 
lows: 

Bucknell, 0; U. of P. 7 

Buckne'l, 48; Ursinus 

Bucknell, 2; Navy 7 

Bucknell, 44; Muhlenburg 

Bucknell, 51; St. Bonaventure, 
Bucknell, 7; Lafayette 10 

(Continued on Page Ten) 



BASKETBALL 



L'p to the present the record of the 
basketball season is as follows: 

Jan. S— Bucknell, 23; Dickinson 17 
Jan. 9 — Bucknell, 24; Susquehanna, 14 

Jan. IS^Bucknell, 20; F. & M. 16 

Jan. 14— Bucknell, 24; Temple 27 

Jan. 1.5 — Bucknell, 11; Swarthmore 21 

Jan. 22— Bucknell, 31; Gettysburg 30 

Jan. 28— Bucknell, 28; Albright 23 

Total 161 Total 148 

The team was called upon to face 
Dickinson and Susquehanna, and to 
play the games on the F. & M., Temple, 
Swarthmore trip with very little prepa- 
ration. The call for candidates was is- 
sued immediately after the close of the 
football season, and about fifty men re- 
sponded. Until the beginning of the 
Christmas vacation the practice periods 
were devoted to fundamentals, and the 
elimination of all but the most promis- 
ing candidates. After the close of the 
vacation previous calculations were 
somewhat upset by the withdrawal of 
Captain Dorris from the squad. Only 
two days remained before the Dickin- 
son and Susquehanna games, and these 
were devoted to developing an effective 
defense. The defense which was de- 
veloped kept down our opponent's scor- 
ing, and enabled us to outpoint them. 
On the trip, following only three days 
afterwards, we were not so fortunate, 
losing a close game to Temple, after 
holding the lead until the very end of 
the game, and also one to Swarthmore 
on the poorest exhibition of basketball 
the team has shown this season. 

After this trip a full week of prac- 
tice brought about great improvements 
in the team. In their next game, with 
Gettysburg, they hit a stride that will 
be hard to beat. Gettysburg came here 
with a record of five straight victories. 
They were confident of adding another. 
Even our own supporters saw very little 
hope of stopping the battlefield tossers. 
It was a great surprise when the Orange 
and Blue took the long end of a 31-30 
score in a fine game, characterized by 
fast passing, good shooting, and close 
guarding. The greatly touted down- 
state combination was not only out- 
scored, it was outplayed. 

The expectations before the Albright 
game were about the same as in the 
case of Gettysburg, but were upset even 
more decisively than the latter. "Haps" 
Benfer, formerly the backbone of the 
Albright teams, has developed a for- 
midable combination at the Myers- 
town institution. Encouraged by an al- 
most string of victories, he was confi- 
dently depending on humbling the rival 
of his student days. His chances of 
succeeding were conceded to be good bv 
mo-Jt everybody. But the Bucknell 
quintette again arose to the occasion 
pnd the final whistle left them masters 
of the situation. 

The team has won all of its home 

games and won two and lost two on 

the trips. The record of no defeats on 

the home floor for five consecutive sea- 

( Continued on Page Eight) 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



FINANCES 



On July the 1st 1920 the Athletic As- 
sociation had outstanding notes and 
unpaid bills amounting to $2,964.77, and 
a balance of $72.04 in the bank. 

The total expenditures during the 
period from July 1, 1920 until January 
1, 1921, which included the expenses in- 
cidental to equipping and maintaining 
the football team, conducting the foot- 
ball games, operating the office, etc., 
amounted to $10,802.04. The income 
during the same period was sufficient 
to pay these in full and leave us a bal- 
ance of $487.90 in the bank. 



During the month of January the 
total expenditures which include a few 
belated football bills and the expenses 
incidental to conducting basketball and 
the office, were $1,340.98. The total in- 
come during the month plus the balance 
on hand on January first was not suf- 
ficient to pay for all these expenditures, 
falling short by $114.58. Our present 
outstanding notes plus these unpaid 
bills amounts to $1,814.58. This in com- 
parison with our standing on July 1, 
1920, shows a gain of $1,088.15 up until 
February 1, 1921. 

The prospects for the rest of the year 
are not at all discouraging. The stu- 
dent budget will probably enable us to 
meet most of our current expenditures. 
This will depend very largely on 
weather conditions next spring. The 
basketball, track and tennis seasons will 
be practically flat losses. The baseball 
season may be profitable or at least 
self sustaining, depending on the income 
of our home games, and also upon the 
cost of the coaching. Indications are 
that we shall end the current year with- 
outstanding obligations of not more 
than $2,000, which will be a considerable 
gain over our standing last July. 

The financial record of last football 
season formed an interesting study. The 
total profits of all our home games 
amounted to $93.23; while our games 
away from home netted us $6,581.33. 
The student budget yielded $2,531.25. 
In other words these three sources of 
income, home games, games away from 
home and student budget, compare in 
order as 1; 70; 27. The conclusion at 
least from this one point of view is that 
we can't stand too many home games, 
i. e., we cannot sacrifice too many of 
these highly profitable games for home 
games on which our best hopes under 
most favorable conditions is to make 
ends meet. 

The question has frequently been 
asked, "Why can't our athletics be con- 
ducted on a self-supporting basis?" The 
inference from the above report is un- 
doubtedly that they can. The fact is 
that we have had an unusually success- 
ful year, and it has been just about 
self-supporting. If we could depend on 
the same good fortune every year, there 
would be no necessity for outside as- 
sistance. But a great deal hangs on 
that "If". Last year our guarantees were 
not as large, the weather was almost 
uniformly unpleasant, and some un- 
usual expenditures were required, with 
the result that a deficit of almost 
83,000.00 was incurred in maintaining a 
standard no higher than the present 
one — really not as high. We may en- 
counter similar adverse conditions any 
year, and whenever we do, we shall suf- 



fer loss. Under the best of conditions 
we break even, otherwise we lose. How 
can we make up the losses? 

The above comments are made on 
the basis of our present standard. That 
standard is not permanent. Other col- 
leges are changing theirs and we must 
keep up with them, or be satisfied with 
a lower rating. That is really the crux 
of the question. It would be a simple 
matter to make our athletics self-sup- 
porting by lowering our standard. But 
we would not be and should not be 
satisfied to do that. We are in com- 
petition with other colleges for a place 
in the sun. Our standard must be kept 
at least equal to theirs, and that under 
present circumstances will require some 
assistance. The reason is that we, in a 
community in which a 2,500 attend- 
ance at a game is unusually large, are 
competing with colleges supported by 
communities large enough in many in- 
stances to furnish more spectators at 
one game than we can attract in an en- 
tire season. 

List of Contributors to the Athletic 
Association 

Charlotte Volkmar, Fred Zug, Warren 
F. Brooks, W. S. Duncan, Geo. O'Brien, 
Mary K. Glover, R. S. Edwards, C. R. 
Hoechst, Stanton R. Smith, R. S. 
Davenport, H. M. Sanders, C. C. Law, 
L. W. Stout, Edwin Paul, P. H. Hert- 
zog, R. W. Meyer, M. M. Abbott, Bruce 

E. Butt, Miller Johnson, W. P. Weaver, 
W. W. Kelchner, Mildred B. Gathers, 
W. S. Krouse, James Elliott, A. S. Bas- 
tian, Thos. A. Gill, R. D. Royer, Ruth 
L. Thomas, S. A. Hart, Meta F. Halde- 
man, Thos. Wood, W. E. Thompson, 
Edwin Wells, B. F. Lewis, Wilma H. S. 
Knapp, J. C. Hostetter,' M. M. Ogden, 

F. W. Harding, Grant Painter, E. Gar- 
roll Condict, A. A. Jordan, G. N. Bru- 
baker, W. C. Lowther, H. F. Smith, A. 

G. Puddicombe, Jas. A. Pangburn, 
Ralph J. Hess, Frank J. Be van, Helen 
Trump, H. R. Goulson, Jas. D. GoUison, 
Grace A. DeWolfe, Robert B. Morris, 
H. G. Thompson, L. A. Amsler, Marion 
Riess, G. E. Tilton, J. W. Aleshouchas, 
Marguerite I. Quigley, Maurice F. Gold- 
smith, Willard Diffendafer, Francis J. 
Beckley, Glaire M. Gonway, Mary E. 
Humphrey, John Davis, H. M. Crist, 
Thos. Wood, John T. Shirley, Edward 
M. Green, John B. Cook, J. E. Glaspey, 
H. G. Fries, G. D. Loveland, Frank W. 
Dillon, Jos. K. Weaver, Roy G. Bost- 
wick. 

® 

BASKETBALL 

(Continued from Page Seven) 

sons still stands. The prospects are 
bright for the remainder of the season. 
The team started the season with only 
two men who had worked together be- 
fore on its lineup. It took up a new 
system of team play. In three weeks 
it has developed into a stronger com- 
bination than most of the colleges of 
this section can boast of. Its defensive 
tactics are very effective. On the of- 
fense it advances the ball rapidly by 
clean, fast passing, and shows ability in 
evading the opponents' guards, and 
finding the basket. It is improving 
daily, and indications are that its re- 
cord this season will be a credit to the 
University. 



OFFICE IMPROVEMENTS 



A good thing takes time. This en- 
tire year will probably be required in 
order to bring our athletic organization 
and administration up to a satisfactory 
degree of efficiency. Considerable prog- 
ress has been made toward this end. 
Office records preserved but not filed, 
which were thrown into almost hopeless 
confusion by several changes in ad- 
ministration, have been classified and 
filed. A complete filing system for pre- 
serving all future records has been 
established. The system of bookkeep- 
ing has been modified so that it will aid 
in the future administration of finances, 
as well as carefully account for current 
receipts and disbursements. 

To provide a place for everything and 
to keep everything in its place is our 
goal. In respect to current activities it 
has been attained. That it has not been 
reached in respect to the old records is 
due to the limited time that can be 
devoted to that work. Some progress 
has been made and the work is being 
pushed as rapidly as possible. When 
the task is completed we hope to have 
a complete record of every game play- 
ed by any team representing Bucknell, 
including the players who participated, 
and the financial results; also a com- 
plete file of former "B" men, officers and 
committees of the Athletic Association 
and minutes of all meetings; in short, a 
comprehensive history of our athletic 
developments. This will require a great 
amount of research and classification, 
but it is worth it. These old records 
are the basis of our traditions. They 
should be preserved complete, and soon- 
er or later, we look forward to a trophy 
room, in which a large part of them can 
be displayed for the inspiration of 
future students and the retrospection of 
the old "grads". 

® 

PUBLICITY 



The problem of reporting our athletic 
activities to the public press was han- 
dled by the graduate manager. During 
the semester seventy-three sports' let- 
ters were sent to about a hundred news- 
papers, scattered throughout the terri- 
tory roughly bounded by Boston, Wash- 
ington and Detroit. As far as it was 
possible to check up on these papers, it 
was found that the letters were pretty 
generally published by all of them. In 
addition vo these letters many editorial 
comments were published about Buck- 
nell and Bucknell's players. We were 
also included in syndicated football re- 
views and one of our players was men- 
tioned in a magazine with a national 
circulation. That we are known through- 
out the section wherever there is an in- 
terest in college football cannot be 
doubted. That there is plenty of room 
for improvements in this department is 
equally true. But when you consider 
our facilities for carrying on the work, 
and realize that practically all of it had 
to be done by mail, it is evident that if 
we did not get all the publicity we 
might have, it was not because any- 
body shirked his work. 

® • 

Clarence R. Weber is auditor for the 
Oklahoma Reducing and Refining Cor- 
poration of America, since September, 
1920. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



THE 1921 FOOT- 
BALL SCHEDULE 



OUR NEEDS 



BUCKNELL IN FOOTBALL 



Filling out a schedule by present 
methods, is something like playing a 
game of chess. Only those who have 
attempted to do it know the endless 
jockeying, shifting and compromising 
that is necessary in order to satisfy, as 
nearly as possible, the three main objects, 
viz, to secure good home attractions, to 
arrange the hard and easy games in 
proper sequence, and to negotiate fair 
financial returns on the contracts. 

The difficulties this year were not un- 
like those ordinarily encountered, ex- 
cepting, perhaps, that they were some- 
what greater. Many of the larger in- 
stitutions were wary of arranging a 
contest with us, because it was too 
much like inviting a defeat which they 
cou'-d not afford to sufler. The smaller 
colleges were also reluctant about 
scheduling games in which defeat seem- 
ed certain. Some forty colleges within 
a radius of about 600 miles of Lewis- 
burg, were approached, and the follow- 
ing are typical of many of their re- 
plies: "We consider Bucknell out of 
our class"; "It would be inviting sure 
defeat"; "Our coach considers it too 
hard a game"; "We have scheduled all 
the major games we can stand", etc. 
On the other hand several very tempt- 
ing offers were received from other sec- 
tions, but had to be refused because of 
the hardships to which the long trips 
involved, would subject the players. 

The schedule, as completed, compares 
very favorable with those of other col- 
leges. The trips are so distributed as 
to reduce that handicap to a minimum. 
The hard games are fairly well placed, 
with the possible exception of the first 
game, with Washington and Jefferson, 
but it was the original intention to 
schedule an easy "home game on the 
Saturday preceding, and this may yet 
materialize. A very important point 
was gained when the Lafayette game 
was fixed at Lewisburg. According to 
our two-year contract, this game was to 
be played at Harrisburg, Williamsport, 
or Lewisburg, and Lafayette was strong- 
ly committed against Lewisburg. Con- 
siderable correspondence and a personal 
investigation of our claims changed 
their views on the matter, and conse- 
quently we shall have the first real big 
game here that has been held in many 
years. 

Our game with the University of 
Pennsylvania, at Philadelphia, was 
dropped by them chiefly because it was 
considered too hard for a practice game, 
although another consideration may 
have influenced the decision. It is 
hoped that we shall soon be back on 
their schedule again. The game with 
W. & J. was resumed after an interval 
of several years. This was due, very 
largely, to the growing demand of the 
alumni in the western part of the state, 
for an opportunity to see the team in 
action. 

It was also intended to have a game 
in the vicinity of New York City, but 
negotiations with the colleges in that 
district were unsuccessful. 

From the point of view of financial 
returns, the schedule is very good, in 
spite of the fact, that we were compel- 
led to more than treble our guarantees 
to visiting teams in order to secure de- 



Our limited gym facilities have been 
mentioned in the discussion of the bas- 
ketball season and in the paragraph on 
physical education. The seriousness of 
this handicap is hard to exaggerate. 
That we have entirely outgrown our 
present plant, is very apparent. One 
small floor and a collection of antiquat- 
ed apparatus is entirely inadequate for 
the needs of our growing student body. 
For this reason it was necessary to cur- 
tail our plans in physical education by 
requiring this work of Freshmen only, 
and making it elective for Sophomores. 
The floor is constantly occupied and 
usually crowded from 10:15 A. M. until 
6 P. iVI., and yet there is a constant 
demand by individuals and organiza- 
tions for an opportunity to use it for 
exercise purposes. 

Besides the handicap mentioned, as it 
aft'ects the varsity basketball practice, 
a very trying situation arose in connec- 
tion with the staging of intercollegiate 
games. About eight hundred students 
are entitled to admission to these games 
on their budget tickets. The capacity 
of the gym is less than four hundred. 
Under the circumstances the Athletic 
Office did not feel justified in offering 
general admission tickets at the door, 
since twice the available space had al- 
ready been bought and paid for. But 
a large number of people from Lewis- 
burg and the vicinity have been sup- 
porting our athletics for years, and were 
entitled to an opportunity to see the 
games if they wished to. The situation 
was presented to the Senior Council. 
They agreed to release their claim to 
a block of seats which was made avail- 
able for the townspeople. The Athletic 
Association agreed to finance the Inter- 
Fraternity Basketball League, so that 
the students would have an opportunity 
of seeing several good games a week in 
return for their budget fee. The so'u- 
tion has proven acceptable, but it is at 
best, only a compromise. It has several 
unsatisfactory features to it. To ad- 
vertise our games would simply be in- 
viting unpleasant situations. We are cut 
off from a source of income which greatly 
increases the financial loss on this sport. 
And, worst of all, we cannot appeal to 
the student body to display their loyal- 
ty by attending the games, for in this 
respect we cannot accommodate more 
than fifty per cent loyalty. 

sirable or really any home games. The 
schedule: 

Oct. 1— W. & J., at Washington, Pa. 
S — Muhlenburg, at Allentown, Pa. 
15 — Lafayette, at Lewisburg, Pa. 
22— W. Va. Univ., at Morgan- 
town, W. Va. 
29— Catholic Univ., at Lewis- 
burg, Pa. 
5 — Navy, at Annapolis, Md. 
12— Gettysburg, at Harrisburg, Pa. 
19 — Susquehanna, at Lewis- 
burg, Pa 
Nov. 24 — Dickinson, at Carlisle, Pa. 

® 

Thanks 



All-Eastern Team 



Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 

Oct. 

Nov 
Nov, 
Nov 



(Philadelphia North 


American) 


Player 


Team 


Position 


Legendre 


Princeton 


Left End 


Kech 


Princeton 


Left Tackle 


Griffiths 


Penn State 


Left Guard 


Alexander 


Syracuse 


Center 


Woods 


Harvard 


Right Guard 


Dickens 


Yale 


Right Tackle 


Lynch 


Dartmouth 


Right End 


Lourie 


Princeton 


Quarterback 


Davies 


Pittsburgh 


Left H. B. 


French 


Army 


Right H. B. 


Bowser 


Bucknell 


Fullback 



Jack Sutherland's Selections 

(Pittsburgh Leader) 



Player 


Team 


Position 


Larkin 


Lehigh 


Left End 


Williams 


Lafayette 


Left Tackle 


Schwab 


Lafayette 


Left Guard 


Stein 


Pittsburgh 


Center 


Griffiths 


Penn State 


Right Guard 


Thomas 


U. of Penn. 


Right Tackle 


McDermott Bucknell 


Right End 


Holleran 


Pittsburgh 


Quarterback 


Davies 


Pittsburgh 


Left H. B. 


Way 


Penn State 


Right H. B. 


Bowser 


Bucknell 

-X- * * 

All-State 


Fullback 


(Philadelphia North 


American) 


Player 


Team 


Position 


Carrol 


W. &J. 


Left End 


Williams 


Lafayette 


Left Tackle 


Griffiths 


Penn State 


Left Guard 


Stein 


Pittsburgh 


Center 


Schwab 


Lafayette 


Right Guard 


Beck 


Penn State 


Right Tackle 


McDermott Bucknell 


Right End 


Killinger 


Penn State 


Quarterback 


Davies 


Pittsburgh 


Left H. B. 


Way 


Penn State 


Right F. B. 


Bowser 


Bucknell 
.>:- * -X- 

AU-State 


Fullback 


(The Harrisburg 


News) 


Player 


Team 


Position 


Julian 


Bucknell 


Left End 


Beck 


Penn State 


Left Tackle 


Schwab 


Lafayette 


Left Guard 


Bihl 


Bucknell 


Center 


Griffiths 


Penn, State 


Right Guard 


Garbish 


W. &J. 


Right Tackle 


Emmanuel 


Gettysburg 


Righ End 


Herrington 


Lehigh 


Quarterback 


Davies 


Pittsburgh 


Left H. B. 


Way 


Penn State 


Right H. B. 


Bowser 


Bucknell 


Fullback 



The Alumni Office expresses its grati- 
tude to Miss Carrie Foresman, '16, for 
a 1918 L'Agenda, which fills another gap 
in our files. Who wants to add a 1916 
L'Agenda? 



Classification of Eastern College Foot- 
ball Teams 

(N. Y. Times) 

Group 1. — Princeton; Group 2. — Har- 
vard, Penn State, Pittsburgh ; Group 3. 
— Boston College, Dartmouth; Group 
4. — Navy, Syracuse, Yale; Group 5 — 
Army, Brown, Lafayette, Penn, W. & J.; 
Group 6. — Bucknell, Cornell, George- 
town, Holy Cross, Lehigh, West Va. 

® 



BIRTHS 



Born, to Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Done- 
hower, a daughter, Carolyn, January 7. 



10 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



TRACK 



For many years the development of 
our track and field activities has been 
almost entirely neglected, due mainly 
to financial limitations. The possibility 
of developing it was dependent on 
whether the basketball and baseball 
losses used up all of the profits of the 
football season. 

In consideration of the fact that of all 
sports, field and track are among the 
most distinctively collegiate, the Ath- 
letic Advisory Board, at its first meeting, 
on the second of October, decided that 
it should be resumed as a regularly de- 
veloped sport, and instructed the Grad- 
uate Manager to proceed with the ar- 
rangement of a schedule of meets for 
this Spring. Accordingly, negotiations 
have been under way with this in view. 
Dual meets have been arranged with 
Dickinson and Gettysburg. A team 
will be entered in the Intercollegiate, at 
Franklin Field. The completion of the 
schedule is now pending, awaiting the 
success of a movement for the forma- 
tion of a Track Association among the 
colleges of Central Pennsylvania. As 
soon as this is definitely decided, a full 
schedule will be arranged and an- 
nounced. 



LOYALTY 

(Continued from Page Seven) 

Bucknell, 45; Gettysburg 

Bucknell, 28; Susquehanna 7 

Bucknell, 20; Dickinson 6 

Total 245 Total 37 

Among the individuals whose per- 
formances were most noteworthy, dur- 
ing the season, Arda C. Bowser, '23, 
must be mentioned first. He was select- 
ed by Walter Camp, as one of his Ail- 
American fullbacks, in an article pub- 
lished in Colliers, on December 18. He 
was the only choice of all the sports' 
writers of the state for All-State full- 
back, and was placed on almost all of 
the All-Eastern selections. During the 
season he scored 102 of the 245 points 
against our opponents. He holds the 
record for having kicked the longest 
field goal of the season, which was 53 
yards. Besides this one, he kicked two 
others, 42 and 43 yards, respectively, 
which gave him the distinction of be- 
ing the foremost field goal kicker in the 
country. 

Three of the other members of the 
team were also selected on All-State 
and All-Eastern teams. Vic Bihl and 
McDermott were recognized everywhere 
as among the best centers and ends in 
the game, and well deserved the dis- 
tinction. Although their work as line- 
men does not admit of as definite a 
statistical comparison with others, 
it was of such high order that there 
is no doubt in the minds of those who 
followed the team that they must be 
ranked with Bowser. 

Julian was the surprise of the season. 
It was not until the fourth game that 
he made a regular position on the var- 
sity, but after he did, he showed such 
rare ability that he gives promise of 
ranking with the best ends Bucknell has 
ever developed. He was selected as 
All-State end by the Harrisburg Morn- 
ing News. 



Mention of these individuals does not, 
in any way, detract from an appreciation 
of the services of the other members 
of the team. Captain Kostos, Mangan, 
Wilsbach, Dooley, Homan, Morrett, and 
Reed, played their parts well, and de- 
serve their whole share of the glory. 
The Team 



TENNIS 



First Team 

McDermott 

Dooley 

Reed 

Bihl 

Morett 

Homan 

Julian 

Mangan 

Kostos 

Bowser 

Wilsbach 



Second Team 
Wargo 
Coene 
Lauster 
Morgan 
Jamesion 
McGraw 
Hahn 
Dayhoff 
Dietrich 
Bellack 
Gdaniec 



Letter men: Dooley, Reed, Bihl, Mor- 
rett, Homan, Julian, Mangan, Kostos, 
Bowser, Wilsbach. 

The election of captain resulted in a 
tie between Bihl and Bowser, and it 
remains for the Athletic Advisory 
Board to cast the deciding vote, which 
will be done at their next meeting. 

Immediately after the Christmas va- 
cation. Dr. Hunt was host to the squad 
at a very enjoyable dinner. In the course 
of the evening Bucknell football teams, 
past and present, were described, and 
compared by Dr. Hunt, Professors Grif- 
fith and Heim, Coxey Thompson, and 
various members of the squad. Gold 
footbaUs were presented to the senior 
letter men. It was suggested and unan- 
imously passed that greetings should be 
sent to Christy Mathewson, '02, Al. 
Jordan, '14, and F. P. McDermott, '21, 
all of whom were formerly prominent 
on Bucknell teams. This was the first 
occasion on which a football team had 
been entertained in the home of the 
president. 

Several circumstances in connection 
with the football season were worthy 
of mention. More people attended the 
games and greater profits were realized 
than ever before. For the first time all 
of the home games were conducted 
without financial loss in a single in- 
stance. 

® 

Collegiate Athletic 

Association Meets 



On Friday evening, December 17th, a 
meeting of the colleges associated with 
the Middle Atlantic States' Collegiate 
Athletic Association, was held at the 
University Club in Philadelphia. Buck- 
nell was represented by Professors E. 
M. Heim and B. W. Griffith and Gradu- 
ate Manager, C. E. Glass. Various 
phases of athletic administration were 
discussed and several resolutions, ex- 
pressing approval of previous recom- 
mendations of the National Collegiate 
Athletic Association, were passed. From 
our point of view, the meeting was 
rather disappointing, inasmuch as we 
expected that more definite results 
would be accomplished in the formation 
of an Athletic Conference among the 
Pennsylvania Colleges. 



-O- 



1 . A. Switzer has recently been pro- 
moted to Assistant Traffic Superinten- 
dent of the Bell Telephone Co. of Penn- 
svlvania, and is located at Allentown, 
Pa. 



Manager of tennis, H. V. Sowers, '22, 
is working on the 1921 tennis schedule. 
Negotiations are under way with the 
colleges of the state for matches. Man- 
ager Sowers will probably be successful 
in arranging at least three matches here 
and several good trips. The schedule 
will be announced as soon as it is com- 
pleted. 

* * * 

A tennis tournament for individual 
honors was conducted last fall. A silver 
cup was offered as a trophy. A large 
number of men entered the contest and 
the competition was very keen. The 
cup was won by J. C. Koch, '23. 

® , 

Alumni Homecoming Day 



On October 15, 1921, the day of the 
Lafayette football game, it is planned 
to arrange for an alumni homecoming 
day, and it is hoped that a large number 
of grads will arrange to return for it. The 
plans are still more or less embryotic, 
and suggestions on the program wiU be 
appreciated. They should be mailed to 
the graduate manager. 

It is hoped that the alumni will get 
squarely behind this proposition and 
make it a real success. Our chances of 
securing first class football games at 
Lewisburg, in the future, will depend 
very largely upon the attendance on 
that day. 

® 

Physical Education 



The limited gym facilities excluded 
the possibility of carrying out our origi- 
nal intentions of requiring the work in 
physical education of all underclassmen. 
It was therefore decided to measure all 
of them, but to require attendance at 
classes of Freshmen only. Twenty class- 
es are conducted each week. The 
periods are devoted to calisthenics, ap- 
paratus work, and athletic games which 
tend to improve the physical condition 
of the men. 

®-^ 

Library Improvements 



Several of the basement rooms in the 
Carnegie Library which were left un- 
finished at the time of building are be- 
ing finished for use as stack-rooms to ac- 
commodate the overflow of volumes of 
the last year. Two 15x30 rooms on the 
west side have been equipped as stack- 
rooms, and the southwest corner room 
is now being floored and painted in 
preparation for the installation of the 
bindery purchased last year. In the 
future the library, by doing its own 
binding, wiU be able to avoid much in- 
convenience and expense. There is 
already accumulated enough unbound 
material to keep the plant busy for 
some time after it begins operations. 



-O — 



An interclass track meet was held on 
October 16. Interest in the event was 
greatly diverted by the stronger at- 
traction of the football season. The 
meet was won by the sophomores, the 
freshmen and juniors taking second and 
third places respectively. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



11 



THE ENDOWMENT FUND charlotte e. shields 5.00 



The Treasurer of the University has 
requested the Alumni Monthly to pub- 
lish the payments to the Endowment 
and Equipment Funds that have been 
received by him. The list is too long 
to present in one issue, and will be 
printed in monthly installments. We 
have grouped here the payments made 
by members of the Lewisburg Baptist 
Church, from May 1 to December 1, 
1920: 

Mrs. William Runyan S 5.00 

Anna C. Judd 50.00 

Esther B. Osbourn 25.00 

Emory W. Hunt 140.00 

Leroy Stephens 150.00 

Alice Payne 18.00 

Alif Stephens 5.00 

Mary M. Wolfe 100.00 

Mary H. Hunt 25.00 

F. E. Burpee 10.00 

Margaret Gretzinger 5.00 

Martha W. Kalp 20.00 

Bele Bartol 5.00 

Coleman J. Harris 10.00 

Wm. C. Bartol 20.00 

Emma Beaver 5.00 

George B. Miller 500.00 

Mrs. S. R. Shorkley 25.00 

Mrs. W. C. Bartol 5.00 

Katherine A. Shields . 5.00 

John T. Judd 1,000.00 

George P. Miller 200.00 

F. G. Ballentine '. 20.00 

Ruth S. Bliss 1.00 

Mary B. Harris 100.00 

Mary S. Gretzinger 5.00 

Mrs. F. E. Burpee 5.00 

Helen K. Bartol 10.00 

F. E. Rockwood 100.00 

Evelyn J. Gundy 15.00 

Mrs. Leroy Stephens 5.32 

W. L. Gerhart 25.00 

Henry T. Colestock 100.00 

From other citizens of Lewisburg, Pa. 

Jacob Hower & Sons $100 00 

I. Newton Reber 25.00 

Wi'.liam M. Dreisbach 500.00 

Laura Hetzel 5.00 

A. A. Hoy 5.00 

Mrs. H. M. McClure 100.00 

Florence Fowler 5.00 

Margaret McClure 25.00 

W. R. Roland 5.00 

John W. Bucher 20.00 

Tohn M. Gundy 10.00 

George J. Bender 5.00 

W. J. Ward 10.00 

Andrew A. Leiser 250 00 

George A. Irland 15.00 

J. B. Weidenhamer 10.00 

Wilson B. Zearfoss 25.00 

Leroy T. But'.er 20.00 

David E. Moyer 20.00 

Verna G. Noll 10 00 

Herman & Leiser 100 00 

J. F. Reber 10.00 

Adda Hayman • 2.00 

Anna R. Carey 50 00 

C. Dreisbach Sons 500.00 

Tames F. McClure 25.00 

bra B.Smith 10 00 

Ellen B. Shields 5.00 

Chas. A. Gundy 25.00 

Mrs. I. J. Butler 20.00 

George T. Bender 5.00 

E. E. Kerstetter 5 00 

W. L. Donehower 5.00 

Andrew A. Leiser, Jr 50 00 

Lewisburg Chair Co 500.00 

Mrs. G. S. Matlack 25 00 

H. H. Difenderfer 10 00 

T. M. Kunkle 5.00 

Mrs. D. E. Moyer 5.00 



Total $5,241.32 

Many of the above items are annual 
installments on subscriptions covering 
five years. 

John T. Judd, Treasurer. 
® 

"Deme" Alumni Back 

For Banquet 



BASEBALL SCHEDULE 

IS ANNOUNCED 



Delta Sigma Fraternity celebrated 
the twenty-second anniversary of its 
founding on the evening of the twenty- 
eighth of January. 

There were a number of the alumni 
returned for the event, including J. L. 
Ulmer, '02; C. S. Roush, '09; W. L. 
Sprout, '10; J. W. Rice, '14; C. W. Lotte, 
14; A. J. Hamlin, '15; H. F. Reich, '17; 
T. J. Heim, '20; H. L. Person, '20, and 
A. G. Shaw, ex-'22. Dr. T. F. Hamblin 
was a guest of honor at the event. 

The active chapter had provided a 
bounteous banquet, and promptly at 
seven thirty the festivities began. C. 
S. Roush, '09, acted as toastmaster, and 
none of the alumni were forgotten in 
the friendly toasts and experiences re- 
lated. A tribute was paid by the alumni 
to "Batter" Robey, '04, who was recent- 
ly elected to the board of trustees of 
the LTniversity. 

Following the banquet, music and a 
general good time were participated in 
by all those present. Several of the 
alumni remained over the week-end, re- 
newing old acquaintances. 



Lewisburg Alumnae 

Celebrate Birthday 



The Lewisburg Alumnae Club cele- 
brated its fortieth anniversary in the 
parlors of the Women's College on the 
evening of February 9. A full account 
will appear in an early issue. 

® 

MARRIAGES 



Cupp-Stuck 

Miss Marguerite M. Stuck, Music 
School, '15, of Milton, was married to E. 
Collins Cupp, '19, at the home of her 
parents in Milton, December 8, 1920. 
The best man was Stanford Kunkle, 
'21, and George Mathieson, '23, was one 
of the ushers. 

After the ceremony Mr. and Mrs. 
Cupp left for a wedding trip in Canada. 
Hinman-Wood 

Mrs. Margaretta D. Wood announces 
the marriage of her daughter, Sara 
Vanderbilt, to Doctor William Dudley 
Hinman, on Saturday, the first of Jan- 
uary, Nineteen Hundred and Twenty- 
one, All Souls Church, New York City. 

At home after February the first,1201 
Salem avenue. Hillside, N. J. 

"Bill" Hinman, '07, apparently re- 
solved to start the New Year right. He 
was aided and abetted by the Rev. 
Charles Francis Potter, '07, pastor of 
the West Side Unitarian Church, of 
New York, who tied the knot and re- 
ports that he did a good job. 

® -- 

BIRTHS 



The 1921 baseball schedule has been 
completed and was announced by Man- 
ager Johnson last week. It is by far 
the best schedule that has appeared at 
Bucknell in years. Twenty-two games 
are called for, nine of them to be play- 
ed on the local diamond. Included in 
the list are some of the best college 
baseball teams in the East. Among 
them are Swarthmore, Pitt, Carnegie 
Tech., and Penn State. One of the 
striking features is the opening game 
with Gettysburg, scheduled for April 
7th, an extremely early date for this 
section of the country. 

Quite a blow was delivered to base- 
ball here recently when Calhoun, var- 
sity outfielder for two years and cap- 
tain-elect for the coming season, an- 
nounced that he would not return to 
school. However, with four letter men 
as a nucleus, the prospects for a win- 
ning team are bright. 

The schedule follows: 

April 7 — Gettysburg at Lewisburg. 

April 13 — Delaware at Lewisburg. 

April 22— Lebanon Valley at Lewis- 
burg. 

April 27 — Duquesne at Lewisburg. 

April 30 — Dickinson at Lewisburg. 

May 5 — Drexel at Philadelphia. 

May 6 — Swarthmore at Swarthmore. 

May 7 — Lebanon Valley at Annville. 

May 11 — Saint Vincents at Latrobe. 

May 12 — Pittsburgh University at 
Pittsburgh. 

May 13— Carnegie Tech. at Pitts- 
burgh. 

May 14 — Duquesne at Pittsburgh. 

May IS— Pittsburgh Collegians at 
Lewisburg. 

May 24 — Dickinson at Carlisle. 

May 25— Gettysburg at Gettysburg. 

May 26— Mt. Saint Mary's at Em- 
mitsburg. 

May 28— Albright at Lewisburg. 

May 30 — Juniata at Lewisburg. 

June 2 — Juniata at Huntington. 

June 3— State College at State Col- 
lege. 

June 4— State College at Lewisburg. 

June 11— Susquehanna at Selinsgrove. 

Tune 13— Susquehanna at Lewisburg. 
® 

Philadelphians Enlarge 

Executive Board 



The Executive Board of the Philadel- 
phia Alumni Club was recently enlarged 
by the addition of Paul Wendt, Sam 
White, and Walter S. Wilcox. 

® 

Philadelphia Banquet 

Date Changed 



Born, to Mr. and Mrs. Fred N. 
Hardy, formerly Florence Halliwell, on 
January 22, a daughter, Ruth Annette. 



The date of the Philadelphia Alumni 
Banquet has been shifted from March 
17 to March 3. 

® 

Cap and Dagger Elects 

New men chosen by competition for 
Cap and Dagger, the men's dramatic 
organization, are; F. H. Gibson, '23. of 
Wilkinsburg: A. L. Wheat, '23, of Mill- 
ville, N. T.; S. H. Rickard, '23, of Phila- 
delphia: W. A. Hoffman, '22, of Vander- 
grift; H. C. McGraw, '23, of Philadel- 
phia- M. J, Stringer, '24, of Philadel- 
phia, and F. U. Davis, '23, of West 
Chester. 



12 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



^ 



PERSONALS 



4 



(Continued from Page Six) 

resides at 1539 South- 58th street, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 

Mrs. Robert J. White, nee Hannah 
Bertin, has moved to 46 North Maple 
street. Mount Carmel, Pa. 

L. W. Stout has been recently elected 
Secretary and Treasurer of the In- 
dustrial Trust Company, a new bank- 
ing concern of Wilmington, Del. He 
was formerly with Laird and Company. 

Boyd H. Walter is now a chemist at 
Mason City, Iowa. He resides at 1607 
North Washington avenue. Mason City, 
Iowa. 

Herman E. Zehner is in charge of a 
plant at Atlas, Missouri. 

E. M. Richards is now with E. M. 
Swoboda, Inc., Empire Building, Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. 

John W. Bressler is connected with 
the Whitlock Cordage Co., of Jersey 
City. His home address is Summit 
View Apartments, 25 Jones street, Jer- 
sey City, N. J. 

Mi'es Elton Dean can be addressed at 
1001 Third street, Juniata, Pa. 

James Bowen Giffith has gone to the 
State University of Iowa, Iowa City, 
Iowa. 

1914 

Hartley Powell is now residing at Mt. 
Washington, Md. 

Dr. Ralph Tyson now resides at 6709 
North 8th street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

The address of Thomas Agnew is Box 
256, Caddo, Texas. 

Samuel H. Coulter is somewhere in 
Japan, teaching. Andrew A. Leiser, Jr., 
met him in Yokahama, Japan, in July, 
1920, at which time he told Mr. Leiser 
that he was teaching at one of the Uni- 
versities there. 

E. J. Richards is completing a law 
course at Michigan. 

W. M. Nicely visited the Registrar, 
on professional business, on January 
13, 1921. He now lives at 308 First 
National Bank Building, WiUiamsport, 
Pa. 

1915 

A. J. (Slats) Hamlin and wife, nee 
Ruth Williams, were the guests of Prof, 
and Mrs. Stolz for a week during Janu- 
ary. They are now living in Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

Theodore Brown is with the Shipping 
Board in Philadelphia, and lives at East 
Monta Vista Apartments, Overbrook, 
Pa. 

Frank P. Cruikshank, ex-'15, is super- 
intendent of the plant of Armour and 
Company in Sioux City, Iowa. 

After February 1, Mrs. Paul P. Aller 
may be addressed at 230 Woodbine 
street, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Mrs. Luella Frank Shortess is living at 
Montandon, Pa. 

Willard L. Moyer has recently resign- 
ed his position as research chemist with 
the Youngstown Sheet and Tube Co., to 
accept the position of heater foreman 
of a twin battery of Koypers By-Pro- 
ducts Coke Ovens, recently installed bv 
the Pittsburgh Steel Co., at Midland, 
Pa. 

Claire G. Groover was admitted to 
the practice of law, before the Supreme 
Court of Pennsylvania, on January 3rd. 

John Wingert paid his father a flying 
visit February 6th. 



1916 

Bruce E. Butt has been transferred 
to the Transmission Department of the 
American Telephone and Telegraph Co., 
and is located at Harrisburg. His ad- 
dress is 1406 State street, Harrisburg, 
Pa. 

E. C. Hagemann is in the Research 
Department of the Western Electric 
Company at 463 West street. New York, 
N. Y. 

1917 

Lora E. McQuay was principal of 
Hood Seminary for three years. In June 
the school was closed and Miss McQuay 
became one of the faculty in the 
Academic Department of Laurel School. 

A banquet was given at Keystone 
Academy, in honor of Prof, and Mrs. 
Clinton I. Sprout just before Mr. 
Sprout left Keystone to become con- 
nected with Peddie Institute. Mrs. 
Sprout was in the class of '18 in Buck- 
nell. 

George B. Champion is with Proctor 
and Gamble in New York City. 

Ralph B. Derr was a recent visitor in 
Lewisburg. He is a research chemist 
for the General Chemical Co., and the 
youngest member of the Methods Re- 
search Committee of the General Chem- 
ical Co. 

Wayne A. Hatfield has recently been 
transferred to the New York office of 
the Henry L. Dohertv Co., at 60 Wall 
street. New York, N. Y. 

Leroy Johnson can be addressed 
% Y. M. C. A., Fort Dodge, Iowa. 
1918 

Mr. H. Frazier Sheffer recently paid 
his Sigma Chi brothers a visit in Lewis- 
burg. He attended the Olympics last 
summer. 

Miss Marion V. Kiess has changed 
her residence to 1442 East 59th street, 
Chicago, 111. She is employed at the 
American School of Correspondence. 

Raymond Cooper was ordained to the 
ministry at Washburn, Maine, on De- 
cember 31, 1920. 

Samuel D. Lenox is at the present 
time a student at Harvard- University. 

Mrs. Marian Seaton Brown now re- 
sides at 49 Merriman Road, Akron, O. 

Miss Rosamond A. Maher, Music, '18, 
is organist in the Baltimore Theatre in 
Philadelphia, and resides at 2238 St. 
James Terrace, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Henry L. Fonda is attending the Law 
School of the University of Pennsyl- 
vania, and is residing at the Normandie 
Apartments, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Harold D. Germer is attending Crozer 
Theological Seminary at Chester, Pa. 

Stanley N. Harris may be addressed 
at Box 369, Philippi, W. Va. 

Tom Cockill, ex'18, is director of the 
Men's Club work at Palmerton. He is 
with the New Jersey Zinc Co. 

Mary B. Beattv may be addressed at 
Lovelocks, Nevada. 

1919 

James R Herman is in the Actuary 
Department of the Metropolitan In- 
surance Co. 

Charles B. Kreitner is now at Lake- 
wood, Wayne County, Pa. 

Alden E. Davis is teaching Argumen- 
tation and Debate in the School of 
Commerce and Business Administration 
of Boston University. He resides at 
127 St. Botolph street. 

Ernest J. Cruse is teaching English at 
Keystone Academy, Factoryville, Pa. 



Karl D. Smith can be adressed % Em- 
pire Co., El Dorado, Kan. 

F. Ames Lawrence is with the Empire 
Co., at Duncan, Oklahoma. 

News comes that N. T. Finger is not 
dead, but is now residing at Steelton, 
at 2529 South Third street. He was a 
second-class electrician in the navy and 
spent 18 months at Inverness, Scotland, 
laying a mine field. 

1920 

Thelora Smith is now lecturing at the 
Chambersburg -Hospital in addition to 
teaching at Penn Hall. 

Charles Warren Miller is teaching in 
the Olean, N. Y., High School, living 
at the Y. M,. C. A. 

Leslie H. Campbell is in chemical 
engineering at Clairton, Pa., residing at 
312 Halcomb avenue. 

Anthony A. Schwenkler is research 
chemist for the Atlas Powder Co., and 
may be addressed at Box 146, Tamaqua, 
Pa. 

Mabel Jones, ex-'20, is teaching at 
Lititz College near Lancaster. 

Margaret Sipley is teaching at Lacey- 
ville. 

Nelson Chance, one of the few engi- 
neering men from last year's class em- 
ployed by the Standard Oil Co., has 
been recently transferred to the com- 
pany's Cuban force. He may be ad- 
dressed at Apartado 745, Havana, Cuba. 

Helen Reed is residing at 201 Living- 
ston avenue, New Brunswick, N. J. 

Jean E. Kerr, ex-'20, may be address- 
ed at 778 Euclid avenue, St. Louis, Mo. 

J. Lester Houser is supervisor of 
athletics in the Lewisburg High School. 
His address is 304y2 Valley street. 

Hayes Person is teaching in the Wil- 
liamsport High School, living at 1121 
West Southern avenue. 

Lester Lighten may now be addressed 
at 2116 St. Clair avenue, Detroit, Mich. 

Charlotte Peters is assistant dieti- 
cian at the Jefferson Hospital of Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 

Hiram Jacob Wagner is in the re- 
search department of the Western Elec- 
tric Co. His address is 3120 Broadway, 
New York, N. Y. 

® 

DEATHS 



The Rev. Mr. Slifer's Death Explained 

A letter from the Coroner of Chicago, 
to J. Hower & Son, Lewisburg under- 
takers, explains the death of the Rev. 
Eli Slifer, which was announced in our 
last issue. It was due to Bright's 
disease and a fractured right collar 
bone, which was received in a fall, 
caused by dizziness. 

Bennett 

Isabel Edgar Bennett wife of Clayton 
Bennett, ex-'22, of Phoenix, Arizona, 
died some time since at her home in 
Phoenix. 

Mrs. Bennett was a graduate of Sun- 
burv High School, and later a student 
at Bucknell, where she met her husband. 
Edith Virginia Focht 

Edith Virginia Focht, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin K. Focht, who 
was a graduate of the Institute of the 
c'ass of 1914, and a member of the col- 
lege class of 1917, died in Washington. 
D. C , January 31. She had been in ill 
health for some time. Interment was 
made February 3rd in the Lewisburg 
cemetery. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI DIRECTORY 



13 

— ! 



For Real Service, Let B. U. Men Serve You 



During the past fe-w years over five hundred (500) Bucknell Students have taken 
out Life Insurance policies -witli tlie Equitaole Life of loiiva. Successful men invari- 
ably are men -wlio, in early years, realized tne value of life insurance. 

Life Insurance makes for Success 

Tyson, '11 RICE ^ TYSON, Gen. Agts., 906 Kunkel Bldg., Harristurg, Pa. 



Andrew A. Leiser 
U. at L.. '69 



Andrew A. Leiser, Jr. 
B. U.. '98, Yale. '99 



Law Offices of 
Andrew Albright Leiser 
Andrew Albright Leiser, Jr. 

Lewisburgh, Union County 
Pennsylvania 

H. B. WEAVER, 14 

Catalogs, Yearbooks, House 
Organs. 

THE PITTSBURGH PRINT- 
ING CO. 
530 Fernando St., 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 



G. F. RASSWEILER 

Professor of Public Speaking, 

BUCKNELL UNIV. 

Dramatic Reader, Lecturer, and 
Entertainer. 

Ralph L. Belford, '05 

Attorney-at-Law 
Milton, Pa. 



WM. R. FOLLMER 

ATTORNEY-AT-LAW 
Notary in Office 



Lewisburg 



Pennsylvania 



John F. WinkelUech, '14 
Invest in a Farm! 

E. A. STROUT FARM AGENCY 
Knows the Good Ones, 
Advertises and Sells Them. 
Phone 113R8 Lewisburg, Pa. 



FOR LEGAL SERVICE IN PITTSBURGH 

'96_A. C. ROHLAND, 1203 Oliver Building. 

'00— H. B. WASSELL, 1404 Union Bank Building. 

'04— E. P. GRIFFITHS, '/ Legal Dept., Philadelphia Co. 

•05— E. A. MORTON, 1204 Park Building. 

'05— R. G. BOSTWICK, 1101 Berger Building. 

'09— H. G. FLORIN, 1101 Berger Building. 



WHEN IN ATLANTIC CITY 

Remember 

The Chelsea Baptist Church 

is on Atlantic Ave., between 

Brighton and Morris 

THOS. J. CROSS, D.D., '91, Minister 

PAUL G. SMITH ;05 

Attorney-at-Law 

HARRISBURG, PA. 

State Department practice, in- 
cluding Corporation Tax and 
Public Service Commission mat- 
ters. 



Harold C. Edwards,' 1 5 
Attorney-at-Law 

Stroudsburg, Penna. 

Geo. P. Miller, '84 
FIRE INSURANCE 

82 University Ave., Lewisburg, Pa. 



Phone 

Calvert 

3573 



New and Used Motors 
Heavy Construction 
Rewinding 

The Keystone Electric Co. 

R. K. HOKE, '15 

108 S. Grant St., Baltimore, Md. 



A. Donald Gray, '14 

Landscape Architect 



8120 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, Ohio 



SAFETY SAVES SORROW 

Many Bucknell "Grads" have been wise enough to protect their hves with Aetna Life Insurance, 
their incomes with Aetna Health and Accident Insurance, and their business with Aetna Compen- 
sation Insurance. The Aetna is the largest company in the world writing these lines. 
THE WILLIAM S. ES.SICK General Agency, Union Trust Building, Harrisburg, Pa. 

FRED V. ROCKEY, '12, Agency Manager 



14 



These Lewisburg Firms Support the Monthly ; Patronize Them. 



COLLEGE LVIV 

Inseparably Linked With Life "On the Hill" 
GOOD EATS AND GOOD TIMES, THE LAW AND PROPHETS OF OUR MENU 



"ON THE QUADRANGLE" 



PAYNE, '09 



Lewisburg Trust 
and Safe Deposit Co. 

Commenced Business 1907. 

CAPITAL $125,000 

SURPLUS AND PROFITS, 87,000 
DEPOSITS 1,025,000 

Your Business 
Solicited, 

Appreciated, 

and Protected 

DANIEL F. GREEN, Treas. 



Renew Your Acquaintance With 
"The Purity Special" Sundae. 

Take home with 3'ou a box of our 
HOMEMADE CANDY. 

THE PURITY 
W. A. BLAIR 

FRESH AND SMOKED MEATS 

Wholesaler of Pork, Sausage, etc. 

Fancy and Staple Groceries 

OYSTERS IN SEASON. 



J. FRED ZELLER 

JEWELER and 
OPTOMETRIST 



J. C. REEDY 

Dealer In 

Furniture and Carpets 

530 Market Street 

THE 

SHIELDS 

Photographic 
Studio 

Distinctive Stationery 

AT 

BAKER'S PHARMACY 

DELMAR INN 



A. J. DUNKLE, Prop. 



WAIN lES 

Opposite the Trust Co. 
The Home of 

HOMEMADE ICE CREAM 
Luncheonette and Parlor 

"GRABS". Your Mail Orders for 

Bucknell or Fraternity Felt and 

Leather Goods will receive our 

Prompt and' Careful Attention. 

H. F. DONEHOWER 

"Varsity Outfitter" 

W. L. DONEHOWER, '06, Mgr. 

JAS. P. BENNETT 

Local and 
Long Distance Hauling 



Phone 84 



Lewisburg 



University Book 
Store 

Books, Stationery 
and School Supplies 

Mail Orders Promptly 
Attended to 

We Pay Postage 

WE WANT YOUR SHIRTS 

Mail 'em in 
Peerless Laundry 

Thompson, '04. Donehower, '06 

Milton Lewisburg Sunbury 

E. C. NOLL 

THE 
FEED MAN 

DR. E. S. HEISER 

DRUGGIST 
Developing and Printing 

IREV'S 
SHOE STORE 

A. J. Irey, '79. 



Union National Bank 

strong Capital and Surplus 

Government Supervision 

Member Federal Reserve 



Employees Acquainted with 
Business and College World. 



SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES 

SAVINGS DEPARTMENT 

TRAVELERS' CHECKS 



John K. Kremer, Cashier. 



RAEZER'S 

Cast and Carry Groceries 
Lewisburg and Milton. 

H. J. Nogel & Bro. 

Jeweler ana Optometrist 
LeVisburg, Pennsylvania 



Engraving 



Watch Repairing 



GRENOBLE BROS. 

University Jewelers 

Exclusive Columbia Agents 

STEININGER CAFE 

Open 6 a. m. to 1.30 a. m. 

Rooms With Hot and Cold Running 

Water 

GEO. E. IRVIN, Mgr. 

Third & Market St., Lewisburg, Pa. 

Herman & Leiser 

Dry Goods, Notions, and 

Ladies' Ready-to-Wear 

Apparel. 

W. C. Walls, John W. Bucher, 

Pres. Cash. 

The Lewisburg National Bank 

The oldest Bank in Union County. 
Established 1853. Capital $100,000. 
Surplus and Profits 8100,000. 3% In- 
terest paid on Savings Accounts. 

HILL'S DRUG STORES 

2 Stores 2 
Lewisburg, Penna. 



Transact Your Business In Lewisburg Through Our Advertisers. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



15 



ADVERTISING RATES 

ITime 4 Times 6 Times 

1 inch deep, 1 column $ 1.00 S 3.50 $ 5.00 

1 inch deep, 3 columns 3.00 10.00 14.00 

V-i page 6.00 22.50 32.00 

1/2 page 9.00 33.00 48.00 

Full Page 15.00 57.50 85.00 



Send Copy 

to 

H. S. EVERETT, 

Lewisburg, Pa. 



FISK TEACHERS' 
AGENCY 

549 Union Arcade, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Teachers urgently needed 
for high grade positions. 



Teachers for 
Schools 



NATIONAL TEACHERS' AGENCY, Inc. 

D. H. Cook, Mgr., 326-27-28 Perry BIdg., 1530 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
'I HAVE PROMOTED OVER 15,000 TEACHERS. WHY NOT YOU?"— D. H. Cook. 



Schools for 
Teachers 



Bucknell Graduates Wanted. 



Have Placed Hundreds of Them 



Under the Same Management Thirty- 
Seven Years 
The School Bulletin Teachers' 
Agency has on its lists many Buck- 
nell graduates, and has placed Buck- 
nell men and women in high and nor- 
mal schools in New York, New Jer- 
sey, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, 
Vermont, Kentucky, West Virginia 
and Texas. An agency which per- 
sonally recommends its members to 
places for which it has been asked 
to offer candidates. Registration 
blanks and full information on re- 
quest. 
C.W.Bardeen, Mgr., Syracuse, N. Y. 



Modern Teachers' 
Bureau 

1002 Market St., Philadelphia 
Needs Hundreds of High Grade 
Teachers for every department of 
educational work. 

FREE REGISTRATION 

and no expense unless position is 
secured. 



MOORE BUILDING 
SUPPLY CO. 

Milton, Pa. 

Distributors of 

All Kinds of Building 
Material 

Agents for 

Johns-Manville Co. 



BUCKINELL UINIVERSITV 

EMORY W. HUNT, D. D., LL. D., PRESIDENT 

Alumni : Help us maintain and increase a waiting list of applicants for admission by filling 



out the blanks below; 

THERON CLARK, Registrar 

Dear Sir: — 

The following are prospective 
college students of the first rank and 
should be on Bucknell's roll next fall. 
[ recommend them on the basis of 
scholarship and leadership. 



Signed 



B. F Thomas, Registrar 

Dear Sir: — 

Please send information about 
. .Arts Courses 
..Preparation for Ministry 
. .Preparation for Teaching 
. .Preparation for Law 
. .Preparation for Medicine 
..Preparation for Business 
. .Preparation for Social Work 
. . Mechanical Engineering 
. . Electrical Engineering 
. . CivU Engineering 
. .Chemical Engineering 
. .Science Courses 
. .School of Music 
..General Catalog 
. .Campus Views 
. .Expenses 
..Application for Admission 

To 



Signed 



G. G. PAINTER, '17, Secretary 



Printers of the Alumni Monthly 



Xne Sun Printing ^ Binding Co., Inc. 

Designers and Producers or 

DISTINCTIVE PRINTING 

Booklets, Catalogues, Direct-by-Mail Advertising, Office Forms, Etc. 

Sun Building, Williamsport, Pa. 



16 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



Bucknell Alumni Organizing 
Million Dollar Corporation 

The Corporation Will Engage in Commercial Banking, Loaning 
on Accounts Receivable to Substantial Manufacturers, Job- 
bers and Wholesalers 



COMMERCIAL ADVANCE CORPORATION 



Capitalization 



.$1,000,000 



20,000 shares of 8% cumulative Preferred Stock, non-assessable. Par value $50.00 per share 

20,000 shares Common Stock no par value. 

The business of the corporation is usually known as Commercial Banking, the advancing of money on open 
accounts, to responsible wholesalers, jobbers and manufacturers, who guarantee the payment thereof. Upon 
receipt of the proper documents 80% of the face value of the account is advanced, the balance being paid only as 
collections are received. Collection of the accounts is in the hands of the company borrowing the money. 

There is a demand for this kind of service far in excess of the ability of the existing companies to supply. 

The profits are exceedingly satisfactory. Existing companies are paying the required dividends on their 
Preferred stock and earning an additional 25% to 35% on their Common Stock. 

Safety is the keynote of the business. Money is advanced only on the best of security to concerns that 
pass a rigid credit examination. 



Offi 



cers 



LOUIS W. ROBEY, President. 

Alumnus of Bucknell University, Class of '04. 
President of the Overbropk Bank, Phila. 
Director of the Parkway Trust Co., Phila. 
Head of Real Estate Law, Temple University, 
Phila. 
NORMAN H. HANNAH, Vice President. 

President of the Northeastern Title and Trust 
Co., Phila. 
FRANK H. TUFT, Vice President. 

Cashier of the American Bank and Trust Co., 
Phila. 



ALEXANDER L. SKILTON, Secretary. 

Vice President of the Northeastern Title and 

Trust Co., Phila. 
Vice President of the Overbrook Bank, Phila. 
WALTER S. WILCOX, Treasurer and General 
Manager. 
Alumnus of Bucknell University, Class of '04. 
For five years Registrar and Business Man- 
ager of Bucknell. 
Treasurer of Richards Manufacturing Corpor- 
ation, Phila. 
Lecturer in Department of Commerce, Temple 
University, Phila. 



Subscription Terms 



One share of Preferred Stock and one share of Common Stock are being sold for a limited time at 160.00 
per block, payable $10.00 with the subscription, and the balance $10.00 per month. 
For more complete information address 

WALTER S. WILCOX, Treas., 

201 FuUer Bldg., 10 South 18th St., 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



Invest for Safety and Income. 

Invest w^ith those who are known to you. 

Salesman wanted to sell stock of this corporation. 



Bucknell Alumni Mo 



Vol.V 



UNIVLR yo 



Jti&' 



Lewisburg, Pa., March, 1921 






L.^. j.' ."ijanJ 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



Bucknell Alumni Monthly 

LEO L. ROCKWELL, '07, 
Editor 
H. S. EVERETT, '12, 
Advertising Manager 

Published monthly during the college 
year by the Bucknell University 
Alumni Association. 

Entered as second-class mail matter 
at the Postoffice at Lewisburg, Pa., 
under the act of Congress, March 3, 
1879. 

Annual subscription to non-members 
S2.00. 

To life members under the $10 plan, 
$1.50. 

To life members under the new plan, 
it is sent gratis. 

To annual members under the new 
plan, subscription is included in the 
annual dues. 

Checks should be made payable to 
Frank M. Simpson, Treas. 



Bucknell of the Future 



The cover-page illustration is a pro- 
reproduction of the architects' plan for 
the campus extension. Despite the 
care taken in preparing the photograph 
and the engraving, the great reduction 
in size made it impossible to obtain a 
clear-cut illustration which should show 
plainly the numbers of the proposed 
buildings. Hence this explanation. 

The building nearest the stadium, on 
the western side of the long avenue 
is No. 1, the club house. The next 
building on the same side of the ave- 
nue is the gymnasium, No. 2. 

Opposite this are found in order Nos. 
3, 4, and 5; museum, auditorium, and 
memorial. Across the quadrangle (la- 
belled "campus") from these are Nos. 
7 and 8, the engineering building and 
the college of fine arts. Between these 
and the old campus are Nos. 12 and 13; 
the former a biology building, the latter 
unassigned. 

Adjoining the gymnasium on the west 
side of the avenue is No. 10, the chapel; 
then No. 9, women's building, and No. 
11, the commons. The smaller buildings 
scattered about the northern limits of 
the new campus are chapter houses, 
and at the northern apex, the gate 
house. 

® 

"He That Asketh" 



In the December issue the Alumni 
Office appealed for copies of the 1914, 
1916, and 1918 L'Agendas. In the Jan- 
uary issue it acknowledged the gift of 
a copy of the 1914 book from Jesse R. 
Riley, '14. In the February issue it 
expressed its gratitude to Miss Carrie 
Foresman, '16, for the 1918 book. In 
this March issue, it must extend its 
thanks to Dr. S. F. Forgeus, '72, of 
Huntingdon, for his presentation of the 
1916 book. 

■ From this history the Monthly draws 
two conclusions: firstly, a very flatter- 
ing conclusion as to the generosity and 
cooperative spirit of the Alumni; sec- 
ond, a perhaps immodest conclusion as 
to its own value as an advertising 
medium. 



WOMAN'S ISSUE 

The April issue of the Alumni 
Monthly will be a Woman's Issue. 
Anne White Galbraith, of the class 
of 1907, Woman's Editor with the 
Pennsylvania Grit, has consented to 
take over the editorship of this 
number, and asks the cooperation of 
the alumnae in making this a live 
issue, truly represeintative of the 
part women have played in the his- 
tory of Bucknell, the part played by 
Bucknell women in the World War, 
their place in the college today, and 
their aspirations for the future. 

Suggestions and items for this is- 
sue are requested. The personals 
will deal with women only. All 
communications should be addressed 
to Miss Anne W. Galbraith, 965 
High street, Williamsport, Pa. All 
copy must be in her hands by April 1. 



The Broader Loyalty 

An alumnus who knows conditions re- 
marked recently to the writer: "I'll tell 
you what ails a lot of your alumni. They 
are still so narrow in their view-point 
that when there seems to be a conflict 
between their college loyalty and their 
fraternity loyalty, their fraternity wins 
out". 

Is this true? Are there alumni who 
see Bucknell only in terms of Eta Bita 
Pie or Eta Fly? The great body of 
alumni emphatically do not. We know 
so many whose fraternity loyalty has 
merged with their college loyalty only 
to deepen and intensify it, that the 
question seems almost foolish. And yet 
from time to time there come evidences 
that certain ones are willing to sacri- 
fice the general welfare to the particular 
interests of a group. 

If the injuries resulting from such an 
attitude were confined to the individu- 
als themselves, one might be inclined to 
let them "stew in their own juice" until 
such time as Satan demands of of them, 
as he did of the hapless Tomlinson— 
Wot ye the price of good pit-coal 
That I should waste on your shriv- 
eled soul? 
But the real danger lies in the nar- 
rowing influence exerted by such alumni 
on the present student-body. Every 
college has difficulty enough in training 
certain of its groups to see the neces- 
sity of subordinating selfish group in- 
terests to the common weal, without 
the handicap of being hampered by the 
sinister influence of its own alumni. 

For such an influence is sinister. If 
we are right in assuming that the chief 
function of a college is to liberalize the 
minds of those under its tutelage so 
that they may place their own individ- 
ual and group interests in proper per- 
spective with the greater things of life, 
such an influence strikes at the very 
root of its educational policy. 

Bucknell has failed in her mission to 
the extent to which she has turned out 
and shall turn out alumni of this type. 
Whatever her equipment, whatever her 
material success, in case she turns out 
men and women unable to see beyond 
their own narrow horizon, she possesses, 
— to use a phrase applied a few years 
since to one of America's great univer- 
sities — the soul of a business college. 

Let us thank God that there are so 
few of this type, and pray that they 
may grow ever fewer. 



The Chemistry Department 

In another column appears the second 
article in the "Bucknell of Today" 
series. It aims to give a brief account 
of the equipment and work of the De- 
partment of Chemistry as it is today. 

Professor William G. Owens, head of 
the department, is too closely asso- 
ciated with the "lab", in the minds of 
all the alumni, to need characterization. 
Tradition has it that he built his house 
in the spot he did in order to sleep with 
one eye on the "lab", lest someone car- 
ry it away during the wee, sma' hours. 
Professor Glenn Vinton Brown is a 
graduate of Dickinson College, with 
graduate work at Johns Hopkins and 
University of Pennsylvania. After ob- 
taining his doctorate at Penn in 1910, 
and teaching at Penn and at St. John's 
College, he came to Bucknell as Assist- 
ant Professor in 1912, and was made a 
Professor in 1913. He is a member of 
various scientific societies and Phi Beta 
Kappa Fraternity. During the war he 
was drafted into government work, hav- 
ing charge of the collection of research 
libraries. 

William Hilliard Schuyler had his 
undergraduate work at Bucknell, and 
his graduate work at Columbia. He was 
made an Instructor in 1915, and an As- 
sistant Professor in 1918. During the 
war he was attached to the govern- 
ment research laboratories in Washing- 
ton. 

Mrs. Sarah Brown, instructor in 
Chemistry, is a graduate of Dickinson 
College. 

Professor O. S. Groner, who has been 
appointed a Professor in the Depart- 
ment of General Chemistry, and will 
take up his duties next fall, is a gradu- 
ate of the Michigan Agricultural Col- 
lege, where he obtained the B.S., degree, 
of the Michigan State Normal College, 
with the degree of B.Pd., and of the 
L'niversity of Michigan with an A.B. 
His graduate work has been at the Uni- 
versity of Chicago, from which he has 
the degree of M.S. 

Professor Groner has had college ex- 
perience in the Grand Island College, 
Nebraska, where he was Professor of 
Physics and Chemistry for five years, 
at Ottawa University, Kansas, where he 
was for eleven years Professor of Chem- 
istry, and at Transylvania College, 
Kentucky, where he has been Professor 
of Chemistry since 1918. 

: ® 

A Resolution 



The Monthly is happy to print the 
following testimonial of the Senior 
Council to the fine personal qualities of 
former Registrar B. F. Thomas: 

"At a recent meeting of the Senior 
Council the following resolution was 
passed upon motion: 

"The Senior Council, as representa- 
tive of the undergraduate body, is 
mindful of the fact that Benjamin F. 
Thomas has endeared himself person- 
ally to all who have come to know 
him best while he has lately been con- 
nected with the University as Registrar. 

"In testimony of this fact, the Council 
directs that a copy of this resolution 
be sent to Professor Thomas, to the 
'Bucknellian', and to the 'Alumni 
Monthly' ". 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



-• " •■■■■■•■■• " •"•■■••■•■■• " •"•'••■'•"•-•"•"•"I 



Al 



umnae 



A 



nniversanes 



LEWISBURG ALUMNAE CLUB 

MARKS FORTIETH MILESTONE 



PHILADELPHIA ALUMNAE 

CELEBRATE THIRTIETH BIRTHDAY 



The mid'winter social meeting o^ the Bucknell Alumnae 
Club, of Lewisburg, marked the observance of the fortieth 
anniversary of the club's founding. Nearly one hundred and 
twenty-five alumnae and friends attended this meeting, which 
was held Tuesday evening, February S, in the living room 
of the Woman's College. 

Established in the fall of 1880 by twenty-three alumnae 
who lived in Lewisburg, the club now has, under the able 
presidency of Mrs. Charles 'A. Gundy, a membership of 100. 
Eight of the founders of this, the oldest Bucknell alumnae 
club, were present and were in the leceiving line. They 
were: Mrs. Katherine B. Larispn, Mrs. Martha Meixell 
Wolfe, Mrs. Eudora Blair VanValzah, Mrs. Christine Beyers 
Vorse, Miss Emma Beaver, Miss Mary McLaughlin, Mrs. 
Valeria Beck Myers, and Mrs. A. W. Brown. In the line 
with the founders also stood Mrs. Emory W. Hunt and Mrs. 
J. H. Harris, with twelve of the twenty-nine presidents that 
the club has had in the forty years of its existence. These 
presidents of the club were: Mrs. Martha Meixell Wolfe, 
Mrs. Valeria Beck Myers, Mrs. Eudora Blair VanValzan, 
Mrs. Weber L. Gerhart, Mrs. Mary Stoner Gretzinger, Miss 
Eliza J. Martin, Mrs. Harry S. Bourne, Miss Elbina T. Ben- 
der, Mrs. John H. Follmer, Mrs. Leroy T. Butler, Mrs. Lewis 
E. Theiss, and Mrs. Charles A. Gundy. 

The speaker of the evening was President Emeritus John 
Howard Harris. At the request of the club he spoke on the 
history and development of Bucknell University during his 
administration which was nearly contemporaneous with the 
life of the club. 

After leaving the army, when Grant no longer needed 
help at Richmond, Dr. Harris said he came to Lewisburg in 
1865. Here he found the hill, and he found the old cow- 
catcher where, as was the custom, he left his trunk. Here, 
too, even then, continued Dr. Harris, he found a good insti- 
tution. The faculty consisted of President Justin R. Loomis, 
Dr. George R. Bliss, who left in 1874 for Crozer Seminary, 
Charles Sexton James, unsurpassed as a teacher of pure 
mathematics; Francis Wayland Tustin, Lemuel Moss, who 
later became president of the L'niversity of Chicago, and of 
Indiana L'niversity; Lucius E. Smith, with Owen P. Eaches 
as tutor. Of these, Eaches alone survives. To know that 
faculty was in itself a liberal education, though President 
Loomis, said Dr. Harris, did not encourage much familiarity. 
For he never spoke to a student until his senior year. 
Furthermore, he always carried a cane, which those that 
tested it said was heavy. 

After four years at Lewisburg, Dr. Harris said he went 
to a briar patch at Factoryville — a twenty acre briar patch, 
where he established Keystone Academy. After twenty 
years he was called back to Lewisburg. Knowing how dear 
a teacher experience is, the youthful educator had noted how 
experience had treated others, and so came to hold certain 
principles which had worked well elsewhere and which he 
adopted here. 

Of these principles, the first, said Dr. Harris, was 
progress. There is nothing that cannot be made better. 
There is nothing that ought not to be made better. No 
year should pass without some definite advance, and so the 
board of trustees, at Dr. Harris' suggestion, passed this 
maxim, which resulted in growth, helped the students, aided 
the faculty, and encouraged gifts. 

It is the part of education always to be advancing. So 
it was with attendance. The first thing, said Dr. Harris, was 
to get a large Freshman class. And with the help of his 
able coadjutor, Mr. Gretzinger, this was accomplished. The 
class of 1886 numbered 6, and the usual large class of that 
period numbered 20. The first Freshman class, under Dr. 
Harris' presidency, that of 1890, numbered 59; and after that 
year it never was less than 50. This, then, continued Dr. 
Harris, was the proper basis of an appeal to the public. 
Bucknell already had more students. And therefore, Buck- 
nell needed more endowment. The more buildings a college 



Bucknell Alumnae Club of Philadelphia and vicinity cele- 
brated the thirtieth anniversary on February .5, when the 
annual luncheon was given in the Cottage Club. Sixty 
women assembled for that ever-delightful experience found 
in schoolgirl and classmate reunion. The classes of 1864 and 
1867 were represented, the former by Mrs. J. R. Howell, the 
latter by Miss Hannah E. Johnson, each of whom gave re- 
freshing reminiscence, in which passed review the "girls" of 
that period, the physical make-up of the seminary, the foods, 
the fun, the discipline. As the various years were glimpsed 
there came the outstanding fact that girls and human nature 
change only little in general principles. Dr. Mary Wolfe, 
whom so many know as the dignified lady who presides at 
Laurelton Village for care of the feeble-minded, in speaking 
for her class, chose to be merry in thought and wit as she re- 
counted a harmless little escapade of two girls disguised as 
adults. The keen eye of the teacher quickly penetrated, and 
the adults as quickly resumed their youth. Mrs. George 
Matlack, though of a class of earlier date, spoke not of remi- 
niscence, but of the present expansion of the university — 
once the seminary, and its larger future, with its new ob- 
servatory, engineering department and . accession of wide 
acres. "Send your children to your own college and so ex- 
press loyalty", was the speaker's advice. Mrs. I. H. O'Hara 
briefly reviewed the founding of the club, which came about 
through desire of her mother, Mrs. Tustin, widow of a form- 
er president of Bucknell. Five graduates answered the first 
summons in 1890, and from this nucleus grew the present 
club. To the young women, many of whom were present, 
Mrs. O'Hara gave the challenge to uphold the spirit of 
loyalty and youthful interest in Bucknell. 

Mrs. Remain Hassrick, of the class of 1909, declared the 
girl of today has greater responsibility than did the girl of 
yesterday; also, she saw geater demands on the school in that 
its courses must prepare for this citizen student who must 
deal with larger problems. In telling the alumnae how to 
help their alma mater the young matron, among other sug- 
gestions, said, seek to make the college more attractive, since 
competition is an element in this as well as in other matters. 

Other "girls" giving either the backward or the forward 
glimpse were Mrs. S. Z. Batten, Mrs. W. S. Catlet, Mrs. EU 
Eldredge, Mrs. E. S. Hopper and Mrs. A. J. Rowland. 

Business followed the program, in which Mrs. Jessie 
Lovejoy Macregor gave musical numbers. Miss Inez E. 
Olds, chairman of the program committee, conducted the 
call for responses. Miss Groff presided. 

The officers of the club and committee chairman are: 
Miss Margaret Groff, president; Mrs. I. H. O'Hara, Mrs. 
John Reilly, Mrs. G. S. Matlack, vice-presidents; Miss Han- 
nah Goodman, Miss Emily Ebling, secretaries; Mrs. E. H. 
Flint, treasurer; Mrs. J. Bird Moyer, executive chairman; 
Mrs. S. C. Bolton, entertainment; Mrs. A. V. Wise, entrance 
committee; Mrs. A. S. Robb, nominations; Mrs. S. C. Smith, 
publishing; Mrs Hassrick, co-operation; Mrs. Matlack, 
scholarship; Miss Inez Olds, program. — Evening Ledger. 

has, the worse off that college is, unless it is endowed. In 
fact our oldest university will not erect buildings unless they 
are endowed at the time of construction. As president, then. 
Dr. Harris' argument was: We have advanced. If this ad- 
vance is to be continued we must have money. Shall we go 
on or go back? Advance means more students. More stu- 
dents mean more endowment. Greater endowment means 
more buildings, and so on. How strongly the trustees en- 
dorsed this argument is seen in the increase from a student 
body of 71 in 18S9, to one of 793 in 1920. 

The second principle, said Dr. Harris, to w'lich he held 
was the conservation of the past. We must hold on to what 
we had — the good-will of those who had helped found the 
school as well as the good-will of old students. No institu- 
tion can spare a single one of its friends. 

(Continued on Page Ten) 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



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Alumni Activities 



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PHILADELPHIAN'S MAKE MERRY 



One hundred and forty alumni and alumnae of Bucknell 
gathered in the Rittenhouse Hotel, Thursday evening, March 
3rd, at a meeting notable for its enthusiasm and inspiration, 
and listened to Dr. Emory W. Hunt, the president, as he 
declared that Bucknell faces today its greatest opportunity, 
that it must continue to lend an uplifting influence in the 
State, that its spiritual development is of prime importance, 
that it must impress noble and Christian ideals on the youth 
who come there for an education, and that in all these things 
the alumni must support their Alma Mater. 

Dr. Hunt's message was an earnest appeal to the Phila- 
delphia alumni and alumnae. He outlined the plans for the 
future, and pointed with particular emphasis to the addition 
to the chemical laboratory and the engineering building. The 
occasion served also to introduce to Bucknellians, Mr. 
Charles P. Vaughn, of Philadelphia, the newly elected trustee, 
and as an introduction to Theron Clark, the registrar. 

"What has happened at Bucknell worthy of note?" in- 
quired Dr. Hunt, in his address. . "You are concerned over 
personality more than anything else, I take it. The person- 
nel has changed; some of the changes represent a great loss". 
He referred then to the death of Dr. A. J. Rowland, who 
for thirty-eight years as secretary of the Board of Trustees, 
kept the records which constitute the permanent life of the 
institution. 

"I do not suppose", added Dr. Hunt, "that there is any- 
one living today, who has been as intimately connected with 
Bucknell University". 

Of Dr. Enoch Perrine, head of the English Literature De- 
partment, he said: "He had been there so long that he had 
twined himself into the very heart of the University". 

He spoke of the policy of the Board of Trustees to the 
end that the faculty at Bucknell may be strengthened by 
enriching the equipment of men who are there, rather than 
by permitting them to go elsewhere and bringing in new in- 
structors. During the coming year three of the faculty wUl 
be on a leave of absence with two-thirds of their salary in 
order to finish their doctorate. 

"A Ph.D.", said Dr. Hunt, "is not equivalent to a ticket 
of entrance to the educational heaven, however. As a fact, 
if there isn't a good bit of personality mixed with the Ph.D., 
I'd rather avoid it in a college professor". 

One of the features of Dr. Hunt's talk was its out- 
spokenness. He explained what is being done at the institu- 
tion, and it was plainly apparent that the diners appreciated 
it. He told the alumni that plans are being made to build 
a S30,000 addition to the chemical laboratory to house equip- 
ment necessary to the enlarging of the laboratory work. The 
trustees are proceeding also with a 870,000 addition to the 
engineering building. The board is doing this on nerve and 
expectation, in the words of Dr. Hunt. 

He paid a tribute to Director Ernest L. Tustin, a mem- 
ber of the board, who was present at the dinner, praising him 
for his energy and devoted effort on the part of Bucknell. 
He also commended Remain C. Hassrick, director of the 
alumni campaign, for the organization of the movement as 
a result of which the alumni contributed to the endowment 
fund of the institution. The 170-acre plot of ground, known 
as the Miller Farm, in the judgment of Dr. Hunt presents to 
Bucknell an invitation for expansion and growth that must 
be accepted. 

"It awaits development", he declared earnestly, "and we, 
the alumni of the present day, we are the ones to make of 
it what may be made of it in the future. 

"In particular, I long for an auditorium up there where 
we can get all our students together and meet them. It 
would be an educational feature of incalculable power for all 
days to come if we could have that! For unless we can 
furnish something of that sort up there, what are we for? 
Personal touch and personal interest in students all the time 
is requisite. If we will furnish it, there is no institution on 
earth that can compete with us, when parents know what 
we are doing and what we are equipped to do". 



Miss Margaret Groff, of West Chester, as president of 
the Bucknell Alumnae Club of Philadelphia and vicinity, 
spoke on behalf of of the women. She said the club cele- 
brated its thirtieth anniversary at its last meeting and that 
there were sixty present. If it continues to increase as it has 
been increasing, the club will be required to leave the College 
Club as its meeting place. 

"Bucknell stand's for qualities that wear well" said Miss 
Groff. "I want to put in a plea for beautiful pictures in the 
buildings. I hope some graduating class will donate the 
nucleus as its gift to the institution. The alumnae are still 
waiting to see a woman trustee on the board, and we hope 
that this trustee will be an alumna of the college". 

Theron Clark, the new registrar of the University, in- 
troduced himself to the Bucknellians, and said that in his 
very short tenure of office he had become thoroughly en- 
thused over the possibilities of the institution. He outlined 
a plan for enrolling students, as a part of which he empha- 
sized the utilization of the influence of the alumni. He 
quoted figures prepared by Prof. Leo L. Rockwell, of Buck- 
nell, which were based on a questionnaire sent out to the 
members of the 1924 class. Of the membership, 217 replied, 
representing 75% of the class. The questionnaire inquired 
as to the influences which brought the various students to 
Bucknell. Thirty-two had come upon the recommendation 
of alumni; twenty-one as a result of the influence of alumni 
teachers in schools in which they were studying; four were 
sent by alumni pastors; and eleven by friends of alumni, in- 
dicating that sixty-eight were influenced by the alumni to 
attend the institution. He gave the interesting information 
that there are Bucknell alumni in forty-six different states, 
and that the present student body of 800 is drawn from 
fourteen states. 

Mrs. I. H. O'Hara was introduced by Dr. Ziegler as the 
woman member of the advisory council organized during the 
war. She emphasized the importance of loyal service on the 
part of women to the Alma Mater, and said that thi§ is 
all the more imperative now that women are permitted to 
participate in the affairs of the nation. To Mrs. O'Hara and 
Director Ernest L. Tustin was directed one of the most ap- 
preciative compliments of the evening; it came from Judge 
J. Warren Davis, of Trenton, at the conclusion of the speech 
of Mrs. O'Hara. He declared that the institution should 
be proud of the interest of this son and this daughter of 
a former president of the college. He referred to Mrs. 
O'Hara as one of Pennsylvania's leading club women, and to 
Director Tustin as the foremost Baptist layman in the 
country. 

Charles P. Vaughn, Vice-President of the Philadelphia 
Chamber of Commerce and newly elected trustee of Buck- 
nell, in a brief talk, pledged himself to any service on behalf 
of the institution. 

The last speaker was A. Lincoln Moore, of New Jersey, 
formerly a minister of Franklin, Pa., and now a member of 
the New Jersey Legislature, He harked back to the time 
when co-education was introduced in Bucknell, and added 
that "some of the good and pious men opposed it in a 
most vigorous way". 

Dr. S. Lewis Ziegler, a member of the Board of Trustees, 
acted as toastmaster, and charmed the audience with bis 
witticisms. The three members of the committee received 
a vote of praise and deservingly so; they were Walter S 
Wilcox, the former registrar, who has taken up a permanent 
residence in Philadelphia; Miss Margaret Groff; and Wil- 
liam D. Reading. 

At the last meeting of the Executive Committee of the 
Philadelphia Alumni Association four new members were 
added to the committee: Wra. D. Reading, Paul Wendt, 
Walter S. Wilcox, and Samuel K. White; the other commit- 
teemen are Homer Smith, James M. Davis, Dr. J. K. Weaver, 
Dr. Samuel Bolton, Jr., Louis H. Ryon, Joseph W. Hender- 
son, Clarence Weymouth, Prof. E. E. Johnson, Remain C. 
Hassrick and L. W. Robey. 

Those present were: Mr. and Mrs. John N. Ake, Mrs. 
H. M. Anderson, Mr. and Mrs. Earl B. Armstrong, Miss 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



Florence B. Barber, Miss Frances Barber, M. Beardsley, G. 
W. Benjamin, Jr., Thos. S. Bracken, Mr. and Mrs. F. Theo. 
Brown, S. M. Bryant, Mr. Hand, Mrs. Wm. H. Carey and 
daughter, Mrs. Perry A. Caris, Mrs. J. H. Chambers, Hon. 
and Mrs. J. O. Clark, R. O. Claypoole, Registrar Theron 
Clark, Vincent P. Connelly, Mr. and Mrs. Alex. C. Conner, 
E. S. Corson, Mr. and Mrs. D. T. Corson, James M. Davis, 
Hon. and Mrs. J. Warren Davis, Glen G. Durham, Miss 
Sarah Dyer, Mr. and Mrs. Harvey E. Eavenson, Mr. and 
Mrs. E. H. Flint, J. G. Gordon Forster, Carrie H. Freuden- 
berger. Dr. A. R. Garner, Miss Hannah Goodman, Rev. J. 
Wallace Green, John C. Groff, Miss Margaret Groff, Miss 
Frances Groff, Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Hamblin, Benj. Harris, 
Romain C. Hassrick, Mr. and Mrs. Jos. W. Henderson, Dr. 
W. C. Hol'opeter, J. E. Hunsberger, President Emory W. 
Hunt, Mr. and Mrs. Fred B. Igler, Miller A. Johnson, Mrs. 
Harriet Newall Jones, Raymond D. Kline, Dr. and Mrs. F. 
B. Little, Mr. and Mrs. W. Kay Lord, Mr. and Mrs. J. G. 
McCormick, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph E. Malin, Mr. and Mrs. 
E. F. Marsh, A. F. Meschter, Dr. and Mrs. A. Lincoln 
Moore, Rev. and Mrs. Geo. E. Nichols, Mr. and Mrs. L H. 
O'Hara, Miss Inez E. Olds, Sidney Peale, Felix Piekarski, 
Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Reading, Mr. and Mrs. W. Stanley Reitz, 
G. C. L. Riemer, Mr. and Mrs. L. W. Robey, Mr. and Mrs. 
Albert M. Robison, Margaret Wallace Ryan, J. Elmer Saul, 
Mr. and Mrs. S. W. W. Schaffle, Dr. and Mrs S. Calvin 
Smith, Mr. and Mrs. S. Homer Smith, Donald A. Sprout, 
H. C. Stanton, Ralph A. StiU, Geo. T. Street, Jr., Dr. and 
Mrs. W. E. Thompson, Mr. and Mrs. Walter Tietze, Hon. 
and Mrs. Ernest L. Tustin, Dr. and Mrs. Ralph M. Tyson, 
Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Van Osten, Mr. and Mrs. Charles P. 
Vaughan, Miss Helen D. Wainwright, Rev. Chas. A. Walker, 
Miss Margaret Walker, Paul R. Wendt, Mr. and Mrs. Walter 
S. Wilcox, Charlemagne T. Wolfe, Miss Isabelle Wolfe, Mrs. 
Irma L. Worrall, Mrs. Thomas Wright, Miss Mary E. Young, 
Mr. and Mrs. Heber W. Youngken, Dr. and Mrs. S. Lewis 
Ziegler. 

® 

PLENTY OF PEP AT PITTS. 



CLEVELAND ALUMNI ENTER- 
TAIN PRESIDENT HUNT 



About 175 attended the dinner dance held by the Pitts- 
burgh Alumni at the University Club on Saturday evening, 
March 5th. It was a glorious evening for the Pittsburgh 
members in that it was one of the largest banquets held by 
any Bucknell University Association this year, and also, a 
fitting send-off to the basketball team on its successful west- 
ern trip. 

Everything seemed to work in harmony for the event — 
the weather was perfect, the Alma Mater spirit was at its 
height, the dinner was elegant, the music lively, and the 
honor of paying tribute to our President, Dr. Hunt, Mr. 
Lindeman, and the team was aU that could be expected. 

R. V. Bost%vick, '05, in absence of the toastmaster, Ed. 
Griffiths, introduced our popular and progressive President, 
Dr. Hunt, who said that the Pittsburgh banquet was at- 
tended by about fifteen more than the one at Philadelphia, 
which he had attended the same week. He also said that 
the success of any college depends upon its personnel, and 
that the faculty at Bucknell was the highest grade of any 
that he had ever associated with. He mentioned with re- 
spect the recent deaths at Bucknell this year; and of the 
condition of the school in general. We were glad to hear 
of the new improvements in the building line to be made 
soon, and of the bright future for the school. 

Mr. Lindemann, who is as popular as ever in this district, 
complimented the Pittsburgh Association on its wonderful 
pep and enthusiasm, and the love for the Alma Mater. 

Mrs. Dumont spoke of the Women's Association of the 
Pittsburgh Alumnae, and that they would be glad to have 
any friends of Bucknell attend their meetings, which are, 
held on the second Saturday afternoon of every month, at 
Hotel Chatham. 

Graduate Manager ot Athletics, C. E. Glass, said that he 
was glad that the actions of the basketball team had passed 
the Board of Censors (Mr. Bostwick Chairman), and that in 
beha'f of the whole team and himself, he would take the op- 
portunity to thank them for their wonderful treatment and 
kindness shown on this trip. 

Arda Bowser, '23, our star football captain, was next 
introduced, and he, in turn, introduced the basketball team. 

Dancing and card playing finished the evening for one of 
the most successful banquets ever held in this district. 



A score of Bucknell graduates gathered at the University 
Club, Cleveland, Ohio, Friday night, February 11, for the 
first meeting of the Bucknell Alumni of Cleveland, heard 
President Emory W. Hunt outline the plans for a greater 
Bucknell and for a closer relation between the university and 
its alumni. 

"We are not finished with each other by any means", 
said Dr. Hunt. "And we aren't talking about closer rela- 
tions with the alumni for what they can do for us only, 
but also for what we can do for them". 

Following a dinner served at 6.30, Dr. Hunt first told all 
the latest news from Bucknell and sketched the plans for the 
extension of the chemical laboratory and for the proposed 
mechanical engineering building. 

Tentative plans for a satisfactory alumni system as out- 
lined by Dr. Hunt, included an "alumni executive commit- 
tee", the members of which would be chosen by the votes of 
all the members of the various classes, and a permanent 
"alumni secretary", located at the college and devoting prac- 
tically all of his time to keeping in touch with the alumni 
and their activities. Dr. Hunt put in a good word for the 
Alumni Monthly, and said that no alumnus should be with- 
out it. 

Dr. Hunt also gave Cleveland Bucknellians their first 
real news on the approaching celebration of the University's 
seventy-fifth anniversary. 

"I think we'll try to have General Bliss come up for the 
occasion", said Dr. Hunt. 

Following Dr. Hunt's talk, stereopticon views of Buck- 
nell and university events were shown, "Prexy" explaining 
each slide. His own picture was thrown on the screen entire- 
ly unexpectedly to him, and he remarked, "Let's see, I think 
that must be one of the janitors. Anyway, it's someone who 
does a lot of chores around the place". 

Other speakers were Mrs. J. R. Smith, class of 1874, the 
oldest graduate present; Dr. H. F. Stillwell, 1881, who was 
on Dr. Hunt's board of trustees at Denison College, Ohio; 
G. Wade Earle, 1915, former English instructor at the Uni- 
versity, and Malcomb Emerick, 1920. Earle and Emerick 
told about the work of the Bucknell Ambulance Unit No. 
525. 

A complete list of Bucknell people present is as follows: 
Mrs, J. R. Smith, '74; Mary Scott StiUwell, '79; Dr. H. F. 
Stillwell, '81; Frank W. Stanton, '02; Dr. H. N. Cole, '06; 
Mrs. Helen Smith Calhoun, '08; Elsie Owens, daughter of Pro- 
fessor Owens, Ellis Persing, '08; F. G. Davis, Dr. M. R. 
Kendal, L. C. Seabright, '11; G. Wade Earle, Kimber Per- 
sing, '15; Mrs. Helen Moyle Bailey, Malcomb Emerick, Lester 
A Herb, George A. Smith, '20. 

Also present was W. C. Keough, a Harvard man, who 
"took post graduate work at Bucknell" as instructor in 
French, 1904, 1905, 1906. 

Ralph R. Snow, class of 1894, although not present, was 
elected president of the Cleveland alumni, and Mrs. Helen 
Moyle Bailey, 1920, secretary. 

It is planned to make the Cleveland Alumni Dinner an 
annual affair, with other meetings scattered throughout the 
year. 



CALIFORNIANS ACTIVE IN MANY WAYS 



My Dear Rockwell: 

I have your letter of the 24th instant, in which you ask 
for news of Bucknell alumni for use in connection with the 
Alumni Monthly. The representatives of our alma mater 
are few and far between out in these parts, but I will be glad 
to give you what information I have concerning them. 

By the way, let me congratulate you on the excellence 
of the Alumni Monthly. I read it with a great deal of in- 
terest. It fills a long felt want and shou'.d do a great deal 
to stimulate the interest of the alumni and keep their enthu- 
siasm for the L^niversity alive. 

You will find enclosed an obituary notice concerning 
Freeman G. Teed, who died in this city a year or two ago, 
and who was a very prominent citizen out here and was very 
active in Knights Templar circles. I do not know whether 
you will want to use this or not, but enclose it anyhow. It 
appears in the Knights Templar Bulletin, which is issued 
monthly. 

Haggerty and I rub elbows every day in our office work 

(Continued on Page Eleven) 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



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Bucknell of Today 



>••»••••■••-•••••• 



GENERAL CHEMISTRY 




Prof. W. G. Owens 



A Brief History 

Chemistry was 
among the first 
courses to be in- 
troduced when the 
University at Lew- 
isburg, now Buck- 
nell, opened i n 
1850, in the days, 
when to quote the 
catalogue, "Board 
including lodging, 
washing, fuel and 
light can be had in 
the village and its 
vicinity, at various 
prices, ranging 
from Sl.oO to S2.50 per week". It was 
taught by acting President Stephen W. 
Taylor, during the third term of the 
Senior year. 

When Professor Charles S. James 
came to the institution the next year, he 
took the Chemistry, which was then 
placed in the third term of the Junior 
year. 

In 1853 Chemistry was given to Pro- 
fessor Justin R. Loomis, and was taught 
in the second term of the Sophomore 
year. In 1857 Tutor Francis W. Tustin 
took charge of the Natural Sciences and 
there were two terms of Chemistry in 
the Sophomore year. 

In 1874 Dr. Cornelius W. Larison 
came to the college and introduced stu- 
dent e.xperimentation. He had a set 
of desks built in the basement of Main 
College, and here the students worked 
out their unknowns. During 1878-79 
Professor Charles S. Allen, Ph.D., form- 
er Assistant of Professor Deramus, of 
New York City, had charge. In 1879 
Professor George G. Groff, M.D., who 
had been here one year as instructor 
and then went to Michigan to take his 
M.D., returned and taught Chemistry. 
At this time there were three terms of 
Chemistry in the A.B. course and two 
terms in the Sc.B. course. In 1885 a 
new Department of Chemistry and 
Physics was formed with Adjunct Pro- 
fessor William G. Owens as instructor. 
The following year Quantitative Analy- 
sis was introduced. Under "Applied 
Chemistry" were included Toxicology, 
Water Analysis, Soil Analysis, Analysis 
of Ores. Organic Chemistry was intro- 
duced in 1893. As the classes increased 
in size, assistants were added to the 
teaching force: Morris C. VanGundy, 
1898; Harry C. Simons, 1900; David W. 
Robinson, 1902; George S. Tilley, 1904; 
John C. Hostetter, 1904; Carl Glycart,- 
1910; William P. Winter, Ph.D , 1911; 
Glenn V. Brown, Ph.D., 1912; Wra. H. 
Schuyler, 1915, and Mrs. Sarah Brown, 
1918. 

In 1900 Ultimate Organic Analysis 
was added to the course and, Physical 
Chemistry in 1901. In 1902 the depart- 
ment was divided, Mechanics and Phys- 
ics returning to the Department of 
Mathematics. In 1903 Metallurgy was 
introduced, and in 1904 there were given 



three terms each of Quantitative, Or- 
ganic and Physical Chemistry. German 
Chemical Literature was included in the 
course in 1906, and three terms of Chem- 
ical Preparations in 1911. Industrial 
Chemistry was added in 1912. Gradual- 
ly the course has been extended and 
strengthened until today the chemical 
laboratory is one of the busiest build- 
ings on the campus. The great in- 
crease in numbers of students in the 
last two ^ears has, of course, strained 
its capacity and hampered the work 
somewhat, so that the extension plan- 
ned for the summer is urgently needed, 
and will afford great relief. 

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 



CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 




Prof. Schuyler 



If the reader had 
visited the old 
vine-colored "Chem 
Lab" ten years 
ago, he would 
have found in a 
dingy room in the 
basement, a half 
dozen students 
producing obnox- 
ius gases and chem- 
icals of all colors. 
If he were ac- 
q u a i n t e d with 
chemistry, it would 
have been needless 
to inquire the name of this place. It 
was the Organic Laboratory. 

If he should visit the Organic Lab- 
oratory today he would have to climb 
to the second floor, and in the large, 
airy rooms, formerly given over to the 
Geology Laboratory, he would find a 
large, modern Organic Laboratory, with 
working space for twenty-four students. 
The odors characteristic of organic lab- 
oratories in general, are well cared for 
by a newly-installed ventilating system 
and six hoods. 

Three years ago the number of stu- 
dents taking the course was sufficient to 
warrant the division of the class into 
two sections, and we now have a sec- 
tion for Chemical Engineering students, 
and one for Pre-Medical students. The 
space formerly occupied by the Em- 
bryology Laboratory is now used by the 
second section, which numbers about 
thirty-five. Both laboratories are over- 
crowded just now, but the extension to 
be erected this summer will relieve con- 
ditions. 

® 

Dr. Hill An Academician 



Dr. David Jayne Hill has been elect- 
ed to membership in the American 
Academy of Arts and Sciences. What 
a signal honor is thus conveyed upon 
him may best be realized from consider- 
ation of the fact that membership in 
this body is limited to fifty. With Dr. 
HiU are elected Lorado Taft, Booth 
Tarkington, and Childe Hassam. These 
men fill vacancies caused by the death 
of William Dean Howells, Kenyon Cox, 
Alden Weir, and Dr. Horatio Parker. 




Prof. Brown 



Those who visit 
the University 
now will find 
many changes 
since the gradua- 
tion of the first 
class in Chemical 
Engineering in 
1913. This class 
received the regu- 
lar diploma award- 
ed the Bachelor of 
Science students, 
accompanied by a small certificate 
from the President, stating that they 
had followed the work outlined in the 
Chemical Engineering course. The di- 
plomas are now given (in English) 
awarding the degree of B.S. in Chemi- 
cal Engineering, and recent action by 
the Trustees and Faculty has made it 
possible for graduates of this course 
to receive the professional degree of 
Chemical Engineer under certain stipu- 
lated conditions. 

The work given in this course has 
been materially changed, old courses 
augmented and strengthened, new ones 
introduced, a wider field of electives 
presented in the upper classmen years, 
and in order to meet future demands, a 
five year course is at least subcon- 
sciously being considered. 

Those who recall the old 1913 days 
will remember the chemical laboratory 
was devoted only in part to Chem- 
istry and Chemical Engineering. Grad- 
ually the Biology, Geology and Zoology 
classrooms have given away to chemi- 
cal students, the last to leave being the 
"dead ones" on the top floor. The 
Chemical Engineering course had grown 
numerically, other courses and depart- 
ments have made increasing demands 
for chemical work and the building is 
now entirely given to the needs of the 
Chemistry and Chemical Engineering 
work. The present year the laboratory 
is very much overcrowded, in some 
cases two students working in one desk. 
Ground has already been broken for 
an addition to the laboratory which will 
incerase its present capacity by sixty 
per cent. This addition will parallel 
the walk and extend over the dry run 
to the south of the building. It will be 
the width of the old laboratory and 
some fifty feet in length. Present in- 
dications are that this will be the first 
of the projected building plans to be 
completed. 

The material equipment of the lab- 
oratory has been increased. A system 
of forced, draft has been installed with 
ample hoods in practically all of the 
laboratories. Blast and reduced pres- 
sure lines have been installed and ap- 
paratus is now on hand for an exten- 
sion of these systems. A small photo- 
graphic dark room and a combustion 
room have been fitted and are now in 
use. We have been provided with py- 
( Continued on Page Ten) 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



i 



>**•»'•»•>"••'•-•"> " » " •*'•■ 



!"••■• " •■■«»■ »l.»..»..«^»».»»«..»..»w«-»«»-.i 



—•"•-•-•-•••••••-••• *% 



About the Hill 



—•"••^••••••««— •••••••••••••••••••— •»• " • ■ 



PHI PSIS ENJOY 

FOUNDERS' DAY 



HILL AND BURG 



The Bucknell chapter of Phi Kappa 
Psi fittingly observed "Founders' Day", 
February 19, with a banquet held in 
the chapter house on Third street. 
Promptly at nine o'clock forty hungry 
men repaired to the dining room where 
justice was administered to the roast 
chicken. 

The after-dinner program was made 
up of speeches and songs. Rev. Joseph 
R. Wood, '94, was toastmaster and 
handled the affairs of the evening as 
only a Joe Wood can. Charlie Clement, 
'97, the well-known mayor of Sunbury, 
spoke, and in addition, led the singing. 
Dr William C. Bartol, '71, and Prof. 
William G. Owens, '80, spoke for the 
older alumni and enlivened the evening 
with stories of "the good old days". 
George Lowry, '20, instructor in mathe- 
matics on the hill, and Morris D. 
Hooven, '20, represented the younger 
alumni on the floor. Other Alumni 
guests were Hiram Bloom, '18; J. Or- 
ville Fraker, '20; Henry Pontius, '20; 
Hayden Evans, ex- '22; Harold Dentler, 
ex-'22, and Kenneth Kennedy, ex-'22. 

Greetings were received from many 
other alumni brothers and all expressed 
their regrets at being unable to attend 
the banquet. 

The evening closed with a loud 
"High-High-High" and the singing of 
"Auld Lang Syne". — The Bucknellian. 

■ ® 

Golightly Wins Golf Cups 



J. R. Golightly, B. U., 1914, of Wilkes- 
Barre, Pa., was the winner of two lov- 
ing cups in the final tournament con- 
ducted by the Golf Association on the 
Municipal Links in Hollenback Park, 
according to an announcement made 
today by City Clerk Fred H. Gates. 
The games were played off on Novem- 
ber 5th and 6th, and were participated in 
by a large number of the association 
members. 

Mr. Golightly won cups offered by 
M. A. Oppenheim and A. C. Fry. The 
Oppenheim cup was offered to the play- 
er whose total gross score in the final 
tournament and two other tournaments 
of the season was the lowest. The Fry 
cup was for the player whose net score 
in the final tournament and two other 
tournaments of the season was the 
lowest. In addition the winner received 
$1.5 00 worth of golf supplies. 

® 

The Seventy-fifth Anniversary 

Plans for the celebration of the 
seventy-fifth anniversary of the found- 
ing of the University are gradually be- 
ing shaped by a committee headed by 
Judge J. Warren Davis, '96. 

As they are formulated, they will be 
announced in the Monthly. 



As the Monthly goes to press final 

preparations are being made for the 

coming of Sherwood Eddy, March 8-10. 

The final act is a mass-meeting of all 

students, held in Bucknell Hall Sunday 

evening, March 6, under the guidance 

of the student committee having the 

meetings in charge. 

* * * 

The Glee Club is polishing off the 
rough spots, preparatory to its Eastern 
trip. The itinerary includes Pitman, 
N. J.; Vineland, N. J.; Bridgeton, N. J.; 
West Chester, Pa.; North Plainfield, 
N. J.; the concerts to be given on the 
evenings of March 28-April 1. 
■:v * * 

Bucknell lost both ends of the Tri- 
angular Debate held with Penn State 
and Dickinson, February 25. At home 
the one Bucknell team defended, 
against Penn State, the affirmative of 
the question: Resolved, that a rigid 
Japanese exclusion law should be pass- 
ed by the United States. The other 
Bucknell team debated the negative of 
the same question at Carlisle. Dickin- 
son won the debate, defeating both 
Bucknell and State College. 

■X- -if * 

The Devereux Dramatic Company 
presented Ibsen's "Ghosts" to an appre- 
ciative audience at Bucknell Hall, 
March 1. 

■^ -A- «- 

Among the Bucknellians who revisit- 
ed their Alma Mater during February, 
were Dr. W. E. "Billy" Thompson, '01 ; 
Aileen Lott, '20; Elizabeth Wickum 
Replogle, ex-'22; Catherine Gehret 
Thompson, '19; Elthera Corson, '20; 
"Jimmy" Pangburn and "Jimmy" Craig, 
'20; Helen Reed, '20; Errol H. Derby, 
'20; Helen Beck, ex-'21; John A. Davis, 
'02; Hayes Person, '20. 

Miss Grace Jenkins, student of the 
Broad Street School of Music of Phila- 
delphia, and of Gilbert Raynold 
Coombs, has been appointed to the 
voice instructorship made vacant by 
the death of Professor Howard. 
« * -K 

C. Palmer Bateman, formerly a lieu- 
tenant in the Bucknell unit, S. A. T. C, 
at present a student at Wesleyan, visit- 
ed the hill during February, 

* * * 

Professor Bromley Smith, '95, gave 
an interesting talk on local history to 
the residents of the Brady Apartments 

on February 15. 

* * » 

The annual conclave of the fifth dis- 
trict of Kappa Sigma was held at the 
local chapter house February 18-19. 
Many guests from other chapters were 
present. 

The Women's Glee Club is filling con- 
cert engagements in nearby towns. 

* * * 

Professor Glenn V. Brown gave a 
very interesting demonstration of liquid 



air at the Chemical Laboratory, Feb- 
ruary 11. 

* -If * 

The Bucknell Lyceum has been de- 
voting the Wednesday afternoons of 
February to popular authors. Mark 
Twain, James Whitcomb Riley, and 
Kipling have been taken up. 

President Hunt and Professor F. E. 
Burpee were both on the month's sick 
list, each being confined to the house 
for several days. 

.K- -A- -X- 

Dean Anna R. Carey is convalescent 
from an operation for appendicitis, per- 
formed at West Chester in the middle 

of February. 

* -» * 

February chapel talks included a grip- 
ping address by President Horr, of 
Newton, and an interesting talk by 
Mr. Decker, of Richmond College, under 
appointment as a missionary to China. 

Dr. Rosalie Morton, who served dur- 
ing the war as a surgeon in Serbia 
spoke in Bucknell Hall February 14, in 
behalf of Serbian students in America. 
Over $75 was collected at the meeting. 
» * -x- 

The annual College Women's Recep- 
tion was held February 18. 

The concert of Rafaelo Diaz, tenor, of 
the Metropolitan Opera Company, was 
given February 16 as the third number 
on the Mu Phi Epsilon course. 

E. Harold Geer, Vassar College organ- 
ist, appeared at the Lutheran Church, 
February 17. 

Professor Nelson F. Davis is recover- 
ing slowly from the effects of a heavy 
fall which he suffered early in Febru- 
ary. The most serious consequence 
was an injury of the nerves of vision, 
which made the use of the microscope 
dangerous. 

Ground has been broken for the ad- 
dition to the Chemical Laboratory. The 
extension will be erected on the east 
side of the present building. 

® 

M. E. Alumni, N. B. 



Professor F. E. Burpee calls the at- 
tention of the Mechanical Engineering 
Alumni to the Annual Joint Meeting of 
the Student Branches, A. S. M. E., 
April 1, at 29 W. Thirty-ninth street. 
New York, N. Y. 

The afternoon session at four o'clock 
will be addressed by George Kingdon 
Parsons and W. S. Murray. A buffet 
supper will be served in the building, 
and an evening session held at eight, 
the program being furnished by the 
Professional Section on Management. 

All M. E. Alumni near New York are 
invited to attend. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



**«i***««>'»H«>*«***~«faM«H«t*«M«Han».>i 



Personals 



..•»*..«..«»»..i 



'••••»•••••••"•••< 



1868 

Dr. Leroy Stephens attended the Dis- 
trict Conference of Baptists at Wil- 
liamsport, February 15. 
1871 

The Rev. George Ballentine is spend- 
ing the winter with his daughter in 
Nebraska, Pa. 

1872 

Dr. John Ballentine is staying during 
the winter months in California. 
1873 

John W. Hague has been spending 
several months at Hot Springs, Ar- 
kansas. He expected to leave there for 
Washington early in March, reaching 
Pittsburgh about April first. His 
Pittsburgh address is 375 McKee Place. 

The Rev. Joseph Wayland Allen, of 
Farmingdale, S. D., has been confined 
to the hospital with a broken hip. 
1879 

Dr. A. J. Irey, of Danville, was in 
Lewisburg during the first week in 
March. 

1880 

The Rev. Sidney W. Rivenburg, 
ex-'80, is located at Kohima, Assam, 
India. He has been a missionary in 
Assam for thirty-seven years. 

The Rev. George W. Stone is located 
at Hollywood, California. 
1883 

The Rev. William J. Coulston re- 
moved March 1st from Sac City, Iowa, 
to New Hampton, Iowa. 

The Rev. Newton B. Williams, ex-'S3, 
is now located at Banning, California. 
1884 

Belated notice of an informal reunion 
of three members of this class is taken 
from the North East, Pa., Breeze, of 
July 28, 1920. The Chautauqua corres- 
pondent writes the Breeze: 

"Rev. Dr. Goodchild, pastor of the 
Second Baptist Church of New York 
City, with his wife and the Misses Stel- 
la and Elizabeth Griffin, of North East, 
Pa., came to Chautauqua and spent 
a day as guests of Dr. Franklin Pierce 
Lynch, who is at home for a year from 
the Congo, Africa, where he is doing a 
wonderful work as a medical mission- 
ary. Dr. Goodchild, Dr. Lynch and 
Elizabeth Griffin were classmates at 
Bucknell, and this was a very happy 
reunion. Later, Dr. Lynch went to 
North East for a return visit and was 
much impressed with the beauty and 
fertility of the famous grape belt". 
1886 

Judge L. S. Walter is a prominent 
candidate for the Republican nomina- 
tion for Judge in Northumberland 
County. 

1888 

The Rev. H. J. Roberts, ex-'88, resides 
at Sunnyvale, California, where he is 
pastor of the First Baptist Church. 

E. T. Derr, ex-'88, is now located at 
5303 Alaska street, Seattle, Washing- 
ton. 




C. W. Lotte, '14 

President New Jersey State C. E. 

Association 

1892 

George W. Wagenseller, editor and 
publisher of the Middleburg Post, is 
president of the Pennsylvania Weekly 
Newspaper Association. 
1894 

Dr. Mary Harris, of Trenton, N. J., 
was called home early in February by 
the illness of her father. Dr. John H. 
Harris. 

1895 

Mrs. Sara Merriman Dyer is instruc- 
tor in student nursing at the Hahne- 
mann Hospital, Philadelphia. 

Dr. G. C. L. Riemer was one of the 
speakers at the conference of the Na- 
tional Education Association at Atlantic 
City during the latter part of February. 
1897 

The Rev. William Hammond Parker 
is secretary of the National Conference 
of Social Work. He is located at 2 
Glen Armand avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Mrs. John Jones, formerly Kate God- 
dard, arrived in Vancouver, December 
7th, and is spending the winter with her 
cousin, Mrs. Carcellas Kendall, in Holt- 
ville, California, while her husband is 
undergoing treatment for a nervous 
breakdown. 

1898 

Mrs. M. L. Drum, formerly Grace 
Slifer, who is Secretary of the Lewis- 
burg School Board, attending the meet- 
ings of the Pennsylvania School Direc- 
tors' Association at Harrisburg in Feb- 
ruary. 

H. W. G. Savidge, ex-'98, is manager 
of sales agencies for the Cooperative 
League of America. His business ad- 
dress is the Standard Life Building, 
Pittsburgh. 

A. A. Leiser, Jr., visited his parents 
in Lewisburg earlv in March. 
1899 

The Rev. Samuel J. Cleeland, ex-'99, 
is a clergyman residing at 405 East Vine 
street, Mount Vernon, Ohio. He is 
married and has six children, four girls 
and two boys. 



1900 

Edgar Reed resides at 24 Drum 
street, Pittsburgh. 

The Rev. Edward Stanton Comrey 
has been for eight years pastor of a 
church in Westwood, Cincinnati, Ohio. 
He resides at 3815 Woodbine avenue. 
1901 

Dr. A. M. Jacquemin is practicing 
medicine at Boise, Idaho. His offices 
are at 9 and 10 Gem Building. 
1903 

G. Herbert Stewart is supervisor with 
the Pennsylvania Railroad at 41 West 
Main street, Newark, Delaware. 

Samuel A. Hart, who has been with 
the Pennsylvania Railroad since gradu- 
ation, is at present supervisor of track 
at Mt. Holly, N. J. He is married and 
has two daughters, Mary, aged four- 
teen, and Ruth, aged nine. Mr. Hart 
hopes to return for Commencement this 
year. 

1904 

Mrs. William R. McClintock, former- 
ly Mary A. Fowler, ex-'04, resides at 
501 Fairmont street, Glendale, Califor- 
nia. 

"Bill" Roberts, after carrying off 
honors at Bucknell and Harvard Law 
School, located in New York City, 
where he has been very successful in 
the practice of his profession. See fur- 
ther particulars under "Marriages". 
' 1905 

William L. Dentler, ex-'05, resides at 
1732 Brighton Road, Pittsburgh. 

Frank E. Ammon, ex-'05, is special sales 
representative for the B. F. Goodrich 
Rubber Company. He is located at 
414 North Craig street, Pittsburgh. 

The Rev. George W. Chessman is a 
minister at Benton Harbor, Mich, re- 
siding at 328 Broadway. 

Postmaster Thomas Wood, of Muncy, 
visited friends in town during the first, 
week of March. 

1906 

Catherine MacLaggan is Assistant 
Professor of French at DePauw L'ni- 
versity. 

Frank C. Shirley, ex-'06, may be ad- 
dressed at Box 356, Erie, Pa. He is an 
accountant with the Wire Forge Com- 
pany. 

Mary I. Campbell is a clerk in the 
Census Geographic Department, resid- 
ing at 210 East Capital street, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

1907 

Cecil M. Winbigler is an architect in 
the service of the LTnited States Gov- 
ernment. His address is "The Cario", 
Washington, D. C. 

Ralph E. Winbigler, ex-'07, may be 
addressed, % The Railroad Y. M. C. A., 
Washington, D. C. 

B. M. Frymire, ex-'07, is supervisor 
with the Pennsylvania Railroad Com- 
pany at Freeport, Pa. 

Gilbert S. Perez may be addressed at 
915 Piescott avenue, Scranton, Pa. He 
is home for a year's leave of absence 
from his work in the Philippine Islands. 



THIS IS YOUR PAGE TO EDIT 



If the Monthly has been, even imperfectly. 

What we have tried to make it for you - 

A reporter of progress and problems at the Hill, 

A refresher of memories of the good old days, 

A putter-in-touch with old comrades. 

And a bearer of greetings from Alma Mater-- 

Will you take out your pen i 

And do your part? 



Professor F. M. Simpson, 
Lewisburg, Pa. 



Date 



Dear Professor Simpson: 

As a token of my appreciation of the effort being 
made by the Alumni Association to keep us old grads in 
touch with the college and with one another, and in order 
to make possible the. maintenance and progress of the Alumni 
Monthly, I enclose check for $ 

Signed Glass 

Address 

(Checks from life-members under the old plan should be for $1.50, 
from all others $2.50.) 



Having now obtained the full status of contributing editor, 
I wish to make the following contribution of suggestions and 
criticisms : 



Suggestions 



Criticisms 



I wish to contribute also the following items to the news columns: 



Class 

Name 

Item 



Class 

Name 

Item 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



190S 

Dr. J. E. Ratajski, ex-'OS, is an ear, 
eye, nose, and throat specialist in Scran- 
ton. 

Dr. Benjamin I. Brody is located at 
5116 Woodland avenue, Cleveland, O. 
1908 

Dr. David J. Hawk is practicing his 
profession in Tower City, Pa. 

Miss Elsie Owens is studying anaes- 
thesia at the Lakeside Hospital, Cleve- 
land, O. 

1909 

E. Wharton Shortledge is in the ware- 
house business at Westgrove, Pa. 

Robert C. Woodward, ex-'09, is chief 
chemist for the Lycoming Motors Cor- 
poration, residing at 1025 Rural avenue, 
Williamsport, Pa. 

Mrs. A. N. Pierce, formerly Gertrude 
M. Townsend, resides at Passumpsic, 
Vermont. 

R. G. Winegardner, '09, is assistant to 
the general manager of the Merchant 
Shipbuilding Corporation, of Chester, 
Pa., residing at 218 West Garfield ave- 
nue, Norwood, Pa. 

Harry M. Walter is manager of pro- 
duction for the Charles Eneu Johnson 
Company of Philadelphia. He resides 
at 40 East Benedict avenue. South 
Ardmore, Philadelphia. 

Charles J. Lepperd was transferred 
January 1 to a main line subdivision of 
the Philadelphia and Reading Railway, 
of which he is now supervisor. He may 
be addressed at Pottstown, Pa. 

The Rev. C. S. Roush, formerly as- 
sistant pastor of the First Baptist 
Church of Elmira, has accepted the pas- 
torate of the First Church of Wilkes- 
Barre. 

C. C. Fries, who is spending the year 
in graduate work in English at the Uni- 
versity of Michigan, is specializing in 
Dramatic Literature. 
1910 

James C. Clark, ex-'lO, is an engineer 
at Beaumont, Texas, residing in the 
Dean Apartments. 

Weaver W. Pjingburn addressed the 
N. E. A. Conference held at Atlantic 
City, February 26, on the subject: "The 
Work of Community Service in Neigh- 
borhood Organization". 
1911 

Allan M. Fitch resides at 220 North 
Fifth street, Camden, N. J. 

Howard M. William, ex-'ll, is a con- 
fectioner at 207 Longfellow street, Van- 
dergrift, Pa. 

Blaine J. Morgan, ex-'ll, is a min- 
ing engineer with the Evans Coal and 
Coke Company, of LTniontown, Pa. He 
may be addressed at Post Office Box 
139, LTniontown, Pa. 

C. H. Heacock is a roentgenologist 
with the Mayo's at Rochester, Minn. 
1912 

Benjamin L. Grier, ex-'12, is located at 
1837 South 57th street. West Phila- 
delphia. 

Dr. John M. Askey, who after leav- 
ing Bucknell took his medical course 
at Medico-Chi, is located at Car- 
michaels, Pa. 

Samuel Blair, Jr., is in newspaper 
work in Chicago. He resides at 6222 
Wayne avenue. 

Walter S. Eisenmenger is Professor 
of Chemistry at Albright College. 

James P. Harris was in town early in 
February visiting his parents. 



Frank W. Langford, ex-'12, is a farm- 
er at Coatesville, Pa., R. R. D. No. 2. 

1913 

Howard V. Fisher, Esq., on February 
14th entered into partnership with Rob- 
ert S. Taylor, Esq., in the practice of 
law. The new firm will have offices in 
the First National Bank Building, 
Bethlehem, Pa. 

Paul R. Wendt has recently been pro- 
moted to be General Agent of the 
Equitable Life Insurance Company of 
Iowa, for the State of New Jersey, and 
has moved' his family to Orange, N. J. 
His offices wi'.l be at 517 Essex Build- 
ing, Newark. Mr. Wendt's career of two 
years in the life insurance business has 
been phenomenally successful and his 
many friends rejoice in the honors that 
have been accorded him. 

John Ralph Bogert, who has been the 
Philadelphia representative of the Pitts- 
burgh Bridge and Iron Works, has been 
transferred to New York and given 
charge of both the New York and 
Philadelphia offices of the concern. 

John F. Sheehan, Jr., ex-'13, is a steel 
inspector for the Pennsylvania Railroad. 
He may be addressed at 1706 Oregon 
avenue, Philadelphia. 

1914 

Mrs. Harry S. Miller, formerly Mary 
E. Race, resides at Sparta, N. J. Mr. 
and Mrs. Miller have two children, 
Vivian Alice, aged four, and Stuart 
Race, aged one. 

Ellen W. Martin is located at Iloilo, 
Philippine Islands. 

William H. Eyster is Professor of 
Botany and Plant Breeding in the De- 
partment of Botany of the LTniversity 
of Missouri, at Columbia, Missouri. 

D. D. Zinn is located at HUlsboro, 
Ohio, R. D. No. 6. 

1915 

E. Willard Samuel, ex-'15, is finishing 
his college course at Stanford Univer- 
sity, where he may be addressed at the 
Sigma Chi House. He is rejoicing in 
the recent addition to his family of a 
baby boy. 

R. K. Hoke may be addressed at Cal- 
vert Court Apartments, 31st and Cal- 
vert streets, Baltimore, Md. He is own- 
er of the Keystone Electric Co. 

Melville Beardsley recently resigned 
his position in the Department of Tran- 
sit, City of Philadelphia, and has em- 
barked in business as a decorating and 
painting contractor. He maintains 
fjachelor apartments at 1420 Allegheny 
avenue, Philadelphia. 

1916 

M. B. Cooke is a research chemist 
for the Bureau of Mines at Pittsburgh. 
His address is 4800 Forbes street, Pitts- 
burgh. 

Joseph E. Malin is head of the Sci- 
ence Department of the Swarthmoie 
High School. 

1917 

H. C. Fisher, formerly with the Penn- 
sylvania Highway Department, is now 
with the United States Geological Sur- 
vey at Washington, D. C. 

G. Grant Painter was recently elected 
President and Treasurer of the Sun 
Printing and Binding Company of Wil- 
liamsport, Pa. 



Dr. Earl Deppen, ex-'17, may be ad- 
dressed at St. Joseph's Hospital, St. 
Louis, Mo. 

Dr. Edward R. McNutt, ex-'17, is 
practicing medicine at Leechburg, Pa. 

Dr. Fontain Burlew, ex-'17, is engaged 
in dental practice at South Amboy, 
N. J., residing at Freneau, N. J. 

Calvin James Smith, ex'17, is assistant 
chief chemist with the Midwest Re- 
lining Company at Casper, Wyoming. 

Norman R. Hill, ex-'17, is in the in- 
surance business at 341 Pine street, Wil- 
liamsport, Pa. 

Joseph R. Fisher, ex-'17, is located at 
635 First avenue, North, Great Falls, 
Montana. 

Howard Liebensberger and wife, for- 
merly Mary Reese, '17, are living at 
Lansford, Pa., where he is chief drafts- 
man for the Lehigh Coal and Naviga- 
tion Company. 

Jeannette Owens is teaching in the 
Williamsport High School. 

Frank E. Stetler is with the Cutler 
Hammer Company of Milwaukee, Wis. 
1918 

A. E. Paulhamus, after a long con- 
finement in the Williamsport private 
hospital, the result of an operation for 
appendicitis, returned March 1 to 
Hughesville, where he resumed his posi- 
tion as principal of the high school. 

The new address of Mr. and Mrs. 
Louis W. Sipley is 421 Ashbourne Road, 
Elkins Park, Philadelphia. 

Elmer R. Conner is in the clothing 
business with his father at Elwood 
City, Pa. 

1919 

Robert Carulla has removed to 1425 
Master street, Philadelphia. 

Mrs. C. C. Fries, formerly Agnes 
Carswell, is a librarian at the LTniversity 
of Michigan. 

James C. Pierce, ex-'19, resides at 966 
East 19th street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Samuel Abrams has returned from 
Bartlesville, Oklahoma, and at present 
is residing with his parents in Milton. 

David C. Gall is at Gibbsboro, N. J., 
studying the paint business. 
1920 

David J. Martin visited the hill 
March 6th. 

Harry T. Wagoner was in town early 
in the month. 

Harvey E. Kauffman, ex-'20, is a gov- 
ernment clerk located at 1135 North 
13th street, N. W., Washigton, D. C. ' 

Mary K. Glover is back at Bucknell 
for graduate work. 

John Nevin Bauman is now located 
at 913 Rebecca avenue, Wilkinsburg, 
Pa. He is a mechanical engineer with 
the Standard Steel Car Co. 

Helen Reed resides at 201 Livingston 
avenue, New Brunswick, N. J. 

Merrill W. Brown was in town di^r- 
ing the early part of March. 

William E. C. Speare has accepted a 
position with the Lewisburg Trust and 
Safe Deposit Company. 

Ralph M. Dyer is teaching Algebra 
at the high school of Chester, Pa., and 
may be addressed at the Y. M. C. A. 

J. Orville Fraker was in Lewisburg 
during the early part of March visiting 
his Phi Kappa Psi fraternity brothers. 

J. Lester Houser is supervisor of 
athletics in the Lewistown high school, 
not the Lewisburg high school as was 
erroneously reported in the last issue. 



10 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



LEWISBURG ALUMNAE CLUB 

MARKS FORTIETH MILESTONE 



(Continued from Page Three) 

The college tried to regain any lost interest, for through 
indifference and absence some old friends had been alienated. 
Within five years all such had renewed their interest. It 
took 6,000 announcements to invite the friends of the college 
to Commencement, and as many as 17,000 catalogues were 
sent out, giving the institution a great constituency. 

Last June a girl from Texas was among the seniors. 
Why did she come to Lewisburg when the University of 
Texas was near her home? More than sixty years ago 
George M. Spratt visited a family in Shirleysburg, Pa. There 
he found a little boy, Davy Leas. And it was a kinswoman 
of that family who persuaded the Texas maid to come to 
Bucknell. 

So it is, said Dr. Harris, that we get students. So the 
seed grows. It was the founder of Emmanuel College at 
Cambridge who said in that school he was planting a seed 
and only God knew how wide that seed would spread. Here 
John Harvard was educated. Today that fruit is seen in 
all our schools, modeled on our oldest university. It is seen, 
too, in us. 

The end of education, continued Dr. Harris, is the 
moral, the religious. By that, he explained, he did not 
mean the ten commandments, nor yet the sermon on the 
mount. Rather by the moral he meant energy, power, in- 
itiative, leadership. Christ's most important command was: 
"Go ye into all the world and disciple the nations". His 
command was to do. 

Sometimes it is said that the world is saved by bad boys. 
The rough and tumble boy, the boy who won't stay put, 
will probably go a long way. He is the sort of man who de- 
velops initiative and leadership. For making this a good 
world to live in, Bucknell has contributed her proportion 
of men of initiative. For consider who come here to col- 
lege. Three-fourths of our students come from Christian 
homes. 

In attaining the end of education we must give the 
student plenty of work and see to it that he does it. One 
can't lay down rules with penalties for their violation and 
expect to handle students successfully, said Dr. Harris. One 
must assume that young men and young women mean well, 
mean to do right. Of the 6,000 that have been under Dr. 
Harris' care during his teaching, almost every one responded 
to just treatment. 

Yet we had to make some discriminations, too, he con- 
tinued. It didn't do, before the Eighteenth Amendment was 



passed, to have the son of a liquor dealer among our stu- 
dents. Nor could we allow an)' man who was injuring the 
university to stay here beyond the end of his sophomore 
year. If he didn't eliminate himself, we had to tell him not 
to return. For an upper classman has influence. It was 
necessary to develop first-class seniors, then the whole prob- 
lem was solved. The lower classmen would follow the 
seniors. So every Monday morning Dr. Harris met with 
the seniors in lectures, but chiefly his object was to come 
to know them. And never, said he, in his thirty years at 
Bucknell, did a senior class fail him. 

Yet work is not all. We must have recreation and play. 
It is important to acquire initiative. Thus bona fide athletic 
teams acquire initiative and so are an excellent help in main- 
taining order. 

Referring to the women at Bucknell, Dr. Harris said 
that they hadn't room enough. In 1911, he said, he recom- 
mended to the trustees the purchase of land sufficient to give 
us a campus of 200 acres, approving the purchase of the 
Miller farm as soon as it should come upon the market. 
Half of this campus he planned to give to women and make 
this the Bryn Mawr of centra! Pennsylvania. You can't do 
this on a three-acre lot, he said. One hundred acres is none 
too much. But if the women want the land, they'll have 
to go after it. 

Another main contributor to the spirit of the institution 
is the Department of Music. It gives courage, hopefulness, 
and good moral qualities to the whole school. Lender the 
leadership of Dr. Elysee Aviragnet, one of the most unselfish 
of men and ablest of musicians, and under its present head, 
this department has contributed largely to the well-being 
of every student. Indeed, said Dr. Harris, money spent 
for the erection of a separate building for the School of 
Music and for its endowment would be to the advantage of 
every person who attended any department of the Uni- 
versity. 

Coeducation was new at Bucknell when Dr. Harris came. 
Miss Stanton, or as the club knows her better, Mrs. Gundy, 
was a path-breaker and conquered a place here for women. 
Indeed with the class of 1894, which entered with ten women 
and was graduated with five, all objection to coeducation 
ceased at Bucknell. 

The religious influence in the institution has been con- 
served especially in the women's department. One has but 
to mention the names of Principal Harriet Spratt, Principal 
Jonathan Jones, Mrs. Larison, Miss Stanton, Dean Thomas 
E. Edwards, to recall how beneficial an influence, beyond all 
calculation, was theirs in religion, morals, music, art. Here 
women lead. Or to use Goethe's phrase: "Eternally it is 
woman that leads us on". — Mary Bartol Theiss. 



Chemical Engineering 



(Continued from Page Six) 

rometer, Emerson and Parr calori- 
meters, Sayboldt viscosimeter, flash- 
point apparatus. Abbe and butyro re- 
fractometers, Schmidt and Hench 
polarimeter, Duboscq colorimeter, Lovi- 
bond tintometer, etc., etc. An electro- 
metric titration apparatus is now over- 
due, and is daily expected to arrive. 
The students of the various Senior 
classes in Chemical Engineering have 
fol'owed the precedent established by 
the Class of 1913, and each year have 
turned over to the department their 
excess breakage d'eposit. So far this has 
been used for the purchase of books 
and several hundred dollars worth have 
been placed in the chemical library 
with funds from this source. Bucknell 
was one of the fifty-two educational in- 
stitutions which were chosen as reci- 
pients of the benefactions of the E. I. 
du Pont de Nemours Company, and for 
three years a "du Pont Scholarship" of 
three hundred and fifty dollars has been 
given to a Bucknell Chemical Engineer- 
ing student. 

There have been approximately 
seventy-five graduates of the Chemical 
Engineering course, many of them oc- 
cupying prominent positions. A census 



of our graduates taken just prior to the 
entrance of the United States into the 
war gave us over eighty-five per cent, 
of our graduates in research and mana- 
gerial positions. There are sixteen 
men in the present graduating class, 
and about eighty of the student body 
are registered as Chemical Engineers, 
including the daughter of Prof. Owens. 
She is the first woman to elect this 
course. 

The best way to realize who we are 
and what we are doing is to visit your 
Alma Mater and make it a point to 
visit us. Come to the laboratory, let 
us show j'ou what we are attempting 
to do, talk with us about our future 
plans and thus assist us to advance. 
® 



12— Bucknell, 28; Gettysburg . .29 

24— Bucknell, 31 ; Juniata 23 

1— BuckneU, 27 ; Juniata 19 

2— Bucknell, 23; Pittsburgh . . .20 
3— Bucknell, 31 ; Carnegie T., 34 

4 — BuckneU, 26; Duquesne 2.) 

The Alumni game scheduled for Mar. 
11 has been called off, because of the 
difficulty of getting a representative 
Alumni team. In its place will be play- 
ed a game against a picked team from 
the Inter- Fraternity League. 



Feb. 
Feb. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
Mar. 



-(t>- 



Basketball Season Ends 



The Pittsburgh trip, in the course of 
which the varsity won three out of four 
games played in and about the Smoky 
City and was loyally entertained by the 
Pitts alumni, ended a very successful 
basketball season. 

The scores for the second half of the 
season were: 

Feb. 5— Bucknell, 32; F. and M. ..12 
Feb. 10— Bucknell, 33; Susquehanna 2.5 
Feb. 11— Bucknell, 25; Dickinson ...20 



Musser, '18, Captains Champions 



Malcolm Musser, '18, who has been 
center and captain of the Salem, N. J., 
Old Oak basketball team, has led his 
five to the championship of South 
Jersey. In the fifteen straight victories 
of the Old Oaks, Musser's work has 
stood out. 

The game played January 29 against 
Millville was especially interesting be- 
cause Musser was pitted against an- 
other Bucknellian, Ray Archer, ex-'15. 
In a battle royal between the two form- 
er wearer of the Orange and B'ue, Mus- 
ser carried off the honors with three 
field goals to Archer's one. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



11 



CALIFORNIANS ACTIVE IN MANY WAYS 



(Continued from Page Five) 

here. We have been in the same oflfice for some five or six 
years now. As you no doubt remember, he married a 
Bucknell girl, Olive Long, of Mill Hall, Pa. They are living 
at 1759% North Vermont avenue, Los Angeles. 

On a recent trip to Seattle, Haggerty tells me, he had 
a very pleasant visit with Paul M. Iseman, ex-'09. Isemau 
is living in Seattle with his family, which consists of a wife 
and two children, one boy and one girl. He is superinten- 
dent of the Vulcan Iron Works in Seattle, and resides at 
3601 38th street. 

On another occasion, Haggerty saw Harold Hunter, '09, 
in Winters, California. "Happy", as we used to call him, has 
three little children, and is a firm believer in Teddy Roose- 
velt's doctrine concerning the perpetuation of the race. 

Here in Los Angeles we see Roy Farr, '08, quite fre- 
quently. He is practicing law in the Merchants Trust Build- 
ing. He has taken quite an active interest in the affairs of 
the Pennsylvania State Society, which is an organization com- 
posed of former residents of the State of Pennsylvania, and 
he was for several years its president. 

When Don Humm, '09, was in this part of the country, 
he was also interested in the Pennsylvania Society, and acted 
as its secretary. I understand Humm is now in Phoenix, 
Arizona, teaching school there. 

Dr. Eddy Shields, one of Bucknell's stalwart and enthu- 
siastic graduates, is practicing medicine here in this city 
with offices in the Merritt Building. I believe he is living 
with his family at La Crescenta. He spent some very in- 
teresting years in China, and has many instructive tales to 
tell about conditions in Asia. He is specializing at the pres- 
ent time in diseases of the lungs and throat and has done 
some excellent work with the tuberculosis patients at some 
of the hospitals here. He is always interested in meeting 
people from Lewisburg, or who have attended school there. 

Rev. George W. Stone was one of the oldtimers from 
Bucknell. He is living out in Hollywood, California, where 
he is engaged in newspaper work. He is no longer active in 
the ministry, and is living with his son here. 

Not long ago I was pleased and surprised to meet in 
the court house. Baron Hilton, ex-'lO. He is married and 
living on a ranch near Burbank, in this county. For some 
years he was' located out near Victorville, in San Be*nardino 
County. 

lola B. Quandt, ex-'09, is living in Santa Monica, and is 
engaged in laboratory work with Dr. Wagner, one of the 
leading physicians there. 

We had many delightful visits with Reuben W. Shrum, 
'08, who is chaplain on board the U. S. S. Arkansas. The 
Arkansas is with the Pacific Fleet, and is in the Harbor at 
San Pedro at various times during the year. Haggerty and 
I with our wives took dinner with him recently aboard the 
ship, and had a delightful Bucknell reunion. Rube is hav- 
ing a great deal of success in his work as chaplain. The men 
all brand him as a real fellow. One of the officers told me 
recently that he was the best chaplain in the fleet. At pres- 
ent they are cruising in South America. They have been up 
and down the coast here and over to the Orient, so that the 
chaplain is getting to see a good bit of the world. He told 
me that when he was in Honolulu recently he met two or 
three Bucknell people, among whom I believe he said was 
Jean Hopwood, '07. 

Every now and then some alumnus gets out this way, 
although it is not often. 

Drew Leiser was here not long since, and last summer we 
were delighted to see Prof. Lindeman and his wife, when 
they were having their trip through the west. Oliver Decker 
was also here a year ago for a short visit. 

This about concludes the roster so far as personal knowl- 
edge of the same occurs to me at this time. There have 
been other alumni in this neighborhood at various times 
since I have been residing here, but a great many of them 
have been here only as transients or have moved away to 
other parts of the country. 

AVith best personal regards to you, I am 
Sincerely yours, 

A. G. Ritter. 



RECEIPTS ON ENDOWMENT AND EQUIP- 
MENT FUND 

(Continued) 

Amount previously reported $5,241.32 

W. M. Woodward, McKeesport, Pa 500.00 

Francis B. Tietz, Philadelphia, Pa 5.00 

Marsh C.- Lewison, Milton, Pa 100.00 

Martha Detwiler, Penhurst, Pa 1.00 

Sarah E. Raup, Milton, Pa 25.00 

Eleanor G. Raup, Milton, Pa 25.00 

Lloyd Webster, Cambridge, Maryland 5.00 

Elmer E. Shimer, Milton, Pa 100.00 

Katherine P. Reed, Sunbory, Pa 10.00 

D. E. Hottenstein, Millersburg, Pa 25.00 

George M. Righter, Muncy, Pa 25.00 

Amy L. Patterson, Eatontown, N. J 5.00 

Roy W. Sauers, MifHinburg, Pa 1.00 

Mary E. Grove, West Milton, Pa 5.00 

J. R. Golightly, Wilkes-Barre, Pa 10.00 

Wm. Van V. Hayes, New York, N. Y 20.00 

Cecile McCollum, Montrose, Pa 2.00 

Louise A. Bassell, Philippi, W. Va 5.00 

Mrs. R. E. Thomas, Crystal Lake, Minn 10.00 

Hugh M. Bullard, Fox Hill, Long Island, N. Y 20.00 

Fred R. Zug, Carnegie, Pa 20 00 

Elmer B. Woods, Glassboro, N. J 20.00 

T. D. Morris, St. Clair, Pa 5.00 

Mrs. W. H. Cassidy, Pittsburgh, Pa 50.00 

Norman E. Henry, Pittsburgh, Pa 10.00 

Margaret E. Wright, Bellevue, Pa 5.00 

Mrs. Roy S. Porter, Crafton, Pa 2.00 

Thresa McCollum, Montrose, Pa 5.00 

D. V. Sampsell, Winfield, Pa 20.00 

Mrs. M. Strickler, Winfield, Pa 5.00 

Charles R. Reagen, Winfield, Pa 5.00 

Mahlen Dyer, Winfield, Pa 50.00 

George Ballentine, Milan, Pa 100.00 

Charlotte E. Ray, Pittsburgh, Pa 20.00 

George F. Bailets, Hamburg, N. J 5.00 

Frank W. Dillon, Erie, Pa 50.00 

A. J. Murphy, Pittsburgh, Pa 100.00 

Lora E. McQuay, Frederick, Maryland 3.00 

Harold E. Smith, Wilkinsburg, Pa 10.00 

Harry B. Wassell, Pittsburgh, Pa. 200.00 

S. A. Hart, Mt. Holly, N.J 50.00 

Margaret Curtis, Montrose, Pa 5 00 

Gwendolyn Hanna, Erie, Pa 5.00 

Bina E. Carr, Pittsburgh, Pa 3.00 

Ralph J. Hess, St. Louis, Mo 20.00 

Emma E. Bolenius, Lancaster, Pa 25 00 

Food Sale, Milton, Pa 36.50 

Elizabeth Griffin, North East, Pa 2.00 

Kenneth C. Richie, Wellsville, N. J 20.00 

H. N. Cole, Cleveland, Ohio 500.00 

Harry C. Fithian, Williamsport, Pa 50.00 

Susannah D. Grove, West Milton, Pa 5 00 

Margaret B. Groff, West Chester, Pa 25.00 

Frances L. Groff, West Chester, Pa 10.00 

Harold L. Shimer, Milton, Pa 100 00 

Henry C. Munro, White Hall, Pa 50.00 

George A. Marr, Swarthmore, Pa 20.00 

Mary B. Beatty, Woodcliff-on-Hudson, N. J 10.00 

Enos C. Baker, Coatesville, Pa 5.00 

Mrs M. M. Barber, Swarthmore, Pa 100 00 

Edwin Paul, Milton, Pa 100.00 

Mrs. E J. Armstrong, Erie, Pa 500.00 

W. E. Thompson, Pittston, Pa 100.00 

John V. Sinton, Imlaystown, N. J 25 00 

Virginia M. Durkee, Bridgeton, N. J 25 00 

Maude T Bowen, Trenton, N. J 5 00 

Roy G. Bostwick, Pittsburgh, Pa 1,000 00 

Ruth R. Frary, Montclair, N. T 10.00 

S. Lewis Ziegler, Philadelphia, Pa 2,000.00 

W. H. Krauser, Milton, Pa 50 00 

Bazaar, Trenton, N. J 3.31 

Mary L. Hayman, Turbotville. Pa 1 00 

Edith Fetherston, New York, N. Y 100.00 

Beulah H. Nisbet, New York, N. Y 25.00 

Inez E. Olds, Haddonfield, N.J 20 00 

Fannie J. McGalliard, Bridgeton, N. J 5.00 

Mary M. Bubb, Dalmatia, Pa 10 00 



$11,846.13 



12 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



The Dix Reunion Plan 



What would you think of a reunion 
plan that would quadruple the number 
of old friends that you would meet in 
your reunion year at the college? A 
plan that would bring back not only 
your class, but three other classes that 
were at college with you? A plan which, 



while it did not make your reunions 
any more infrequent in occurrence, 
would make them more worth while by 
restoring more fully the atmosphere 
and the friendships and rivalries of the 
old days? 

That is precisely what the so-called 
"Dix plan" makes possible. Further- 
more, it brings it about that in four 
reunion cycles you have met with all 



seven of the classes with which you 
were in college. 

It can be introduced without interfer- 
ing with the old five-year scheme — in- 
deed, it can be carried on alongside of 
this scheme. 

Is it worth while for the Alumni As- 
sociation to consider the advisability of 
adopting the Dix plan? 



Year 


1921 


1922 


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T 


he Dix 


Reur 


ion P 


Ian as 


it wc 


uld w 


ork at Bucknell 













EUROPEAN TOUR 

ITALY, SWITZERLAND, FRANCE, BELGIUM AND ENGLAND 

Duration, Sixty Days Sailing, June 30 

Organized and Conducted by 
PROFESSOR B. W. GRIFFITH, BUCKNELL UNIVERSITY 



Cost, $885.00 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI DIRECTORY 



13 



For Real Service, Let B. U. Men Serve You 



During the past few years over five hundred (500) Bucknell Students Kave taken 
out Life Insurance policies -with tne EquitaDie Life of Iowa. Successful men invari- 
ably are men -wKo, in early years, realized the value of life insurance. 

Life Insurance makes for Success 

Tyson, '11 RICE ^ TYSON, Gen. Agts., 906 Kunkel Bldg., HarrisLurg, Pa. 



Andrew A. Leiser 
U. at L., '69 



Andrew A. Leiser, Jr. 
B. U.. ■98. Yale, '99 



Law Offices of 
Andrew Albright Leiser 
Andrew Albright Leiser, Jr. 

Lewisburgh, Union County 
Pennsylvania 

H. B. WEAVER, '14 

Catalogs, Yearbooks, House 
Organs. 

THE PITTSBURGH PRINT- 
•ING CO. 
530 Fernando St., 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 



G. F. RASSWEILER 

Professor of Public Speaking, 

BUCKNELL UNIV. 

Dramatic Reader, Lecturer, and 
Entertainer. 



Ralph L. Belford, '05 

Attorney-at-Law 
Milton, Pa. 



WM. R. FOLLMER 

ATTORNEY-AT-LAW 
Notary in Office 



Lewisburg 



Pennsylvania 



Jolin F. Winkelblech, '14 
Invest in a Farm! 

E. A. STROUT FARM AGENCY 
Knows the Good Ones, 
Advertises and Sells Them. 
Phone 113R8 Lewisburg, Pa. 



FOR LEGAL SERVICE IN PITTSBURGH 

'96— A. C. ROHLAND, 1203 Oliver Building. 

'00— H. B. WASSELL, 1404 Union Bank Building. 

'04— E. P. GRIFFITHS, '/o Legal Dept., Philadelphia Co. 

'05— E. A. MORTON, 1204 Park Building. 

'05~R. G. BOSTWICK, 1101 Berger Building. 

'09— H. G. FLORIN, 1101 Berger Building. 



WHEN IN ATLANTIC CITY 

Remember 

The Chelsea Baptist Church 

is on Atlantic Ave., between 

Brighton and Morris 

THOS. J. CROSS, D.D., '91, Minister 

PAUL G. SMITH, 05 

Attomey-at-Law 

HARRISBURG, PA. 

State Department practice, in- 
cluding Corporation Tax and 
Public Service Commission mat- 
ters. 



Harold C. Edwards,' 1 5 
Attorney-at-Law 

Stroudsburg, Penna. 

Geo. P. Miller, '84 
FIRE INSURANCE 

82 University Ave., Lewisburg, Pa. 



New and Used Motors Phone 

Heavy Construction Calvert 

Rewinding 3673 

The Keystone Electric Co. 

R. K. HOKE, '16 

108 S. Grant St., Baltimore, Md. 

A. Donald Gray, '14 
Landscape Architect 



8120 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, Ohio 



SAFETY SAVES SORROW 

Many Bucknell "Grads" have been wise enough to protect their lives with Aetna Life Insurance, 
their incomes with Aetna Health and Accident Insurance, and their business with Aetna Compen- 
sation Insurance. The Aetna is the largest company in the world writing these lines. 
THE WILLIAM S. ESSICK General Agency, Union Trust Building, Harrisburg, Pa. 

FRED V. ROCKEY, '12, Agency Manager 



14 



These Lewisburg Firms Support the Monthly ; Patronize Them. 



COLLEGE IKIV 

Inseparably Linked With Life "On the Hill" 
GOOD EATS AND GOOD TIMES, THE LAW AND PROPHETS OF OUR MENU 



"ON THE QUADRANGLE" 



PAYNE, '09 



Lewisburg Trust 
and Safe Deposit Co. 

Commenced Business 1907. 

CAPITAL $125,000 

SURPLUS AND PROFITS, 87,000 
DEPOSITS 1,025,000 

Your Business 
Solicited, 

Appreciated, 

and Protected 

DANIEL F. GREEN, Treas. 

Renew Your Acquaintance With 

"The Purity Special" Sundae. 

Take home with you a box of our 

HOMEMADE CANDY. 

THE PURITY 
W. A. BLAIR 

FRESH AND SMOKED MEATS 

Wholesaler of Pork, Sausage, etc. 

Fancy and Staple Groceries 

OYSTERS IN SEASON. 

J. FRED ZELLER 

JEWELER and 
OPTOMETRIST 



J. C. REEDY 

Dealer In 

Furniture and Carpets 

530 Market Street 

THE 

SHIELDS 

Photographic 
Studio 

Distinctive Stationery 

AT 

BAKER'S PHARMACY 

DELMAR INN 



A. J. DUNKLE, Prop. 



WAIN I ES 

Opposite the Trust Co. 
The Home of 

HOMEMADE ICE CREAM 
Luncheonette and Parlor 

"GRADS". Your Mail Orders for 

Bucknell or Fraternity Felt and 

Leather Goods will receive our 

Prompt and Careful Attention. 

H. F. DONEHOWER 

"Varsity Outfitter" 

W. L. DONEHOWER, '06, Mgr. 

JAS. P. BENNETT 

Local and 
Long Distance Hauling 



Phone 84 



Lewisburg 



University Book 
Store 

Books, Stationery 

and School Supplies 

Mail Orders Promptly 
Attended to 

We Pay Postage 

WE WANT YOUR SHIRTS 

Mail 'em in 

Peerless Laundry 

Thompson, '04. Donehower, '06 

Milton Lewisburg Sunbury 

E. C. NOLL 

THE 
FEED MAN 

DR. E. S. HEISER 

DRUGGIST 
Developing and Printing 

IREY'S 
SHOE STORE 

A. J. Irey, '79. 



Union National Bank 

strong Capital and Surplus 

Government Supervision 

Member Federal Reserve 



Employees Acquainted with 
Business and College World. 



SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES 

SAVINGS DEPARTMENT 

TRAVELERS' CHECKS 



John K. Kremer, Cashier. 

RAEZER'S 

Cask ana Carry Groceries 
Lewisburg and Milton. 

H. J. Nogel & Bro. 

Jeweler ana Optometrist 

Lewisburg, Pennsylvania 



Engraving 



Watch Repairing 



GRENOBLE BROS. 

University Jewelers 

Exclusive Columbia Agents 

STEININGER CAFE 

Open 6 a. m. to 1.30 a. m. 

Rooms With Hot and Cold Running 

Water 

GEO. E. IRVIN, Mgr. 

Third & Market St., Lewisburg, Pa. 

Herman & Leiser 

Dry Goods, Notions, and 

Ladies' Ready-to- Wear 

Apparel. 



W. C. Walls, 
Pres. 



John W. Bucher, 
Cash. 



The Lewisburg National Bank 

The oldest Bank in Union County. 
Established 1853. Capital $100,000. 
Surplus and Profits $100,000. 3% In- 
terest paid on Savings Accounts. 

HILL'S DRUG STORES 

2 Stores 2 
Lewisburg, Penna. 



Transact Your Business In Lewisburg Through Our Advertisers. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



15 



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AGENCY 

549 Union Arcade, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Teachers urgently needed 
for high grade positions. 



Teachers fop 

Schools 



NATIONAL TEACHERS' AGENCY, Inc. 

D. H. Cook, Mgr., 326-27-28 Perry BIdg., 1530 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
"I HAVE PROMOTED OVER 15,000 TEACHERS. WHY NOT YOU?"— D. H. Cook. 

Bucknell Graduates Wanted. 



Schools for 
Teachers 



Have Placed Hundreds of Them 



Under the Same Management Thirty- 
Seven Years 
The School Bulletin Teachers' 
Agency has on its lists many Buck- 
nell graduates, and has placed Buck- 
nell men and women in high and nor- 
mal schools in New York, New Jer- 
sey, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, 
Vermont, Kentucky, West Virginia 
and Texas. An agency which per- 
sonally recommends its members to 
places for which it has been asked 
to offer candidates. Registration 
blanks and full information on re- 
quest. 
C.W.Bardeen, Mgr., Syracuse, N. Y. 



Modern Teachers' 
Bureau 

1002 Market St, PhUadelphia 
Needs Hundreds of High Grade 
Teachers for every department of 
educational work. 

FREE REGISTRATION 

and no expense unless position is 
secured. 



MOORE BUILDING 
SUPPLY CO. 

Milton, Pa. 

Distributors of 

All Kinds of Building 
Material 

Agents for 

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BUCK^JEUL UINIVERSITV 

EMORY W. HUNT, D. D., LL. D., PRESIDENT 

Alumni : Help us maintain and increase a waiting list of applicants for admission by filling 



out the blanks below: 

THERON CLARK, Registrar 

Dear Sir: — 

The following are prospective 
college students of the first rank and 
should be on Bucknell's roll next fall. 
[ recommend them on the basis of 
scholarship and leadership. 



Signed 



Theron Clark, Reg^istrar 
Dear Sir: — 

Please send information about 

. .Arts Courses 

. .Preparation for Ministry 

. .Preparation for Teaching 

..Preparation for Law 

..Preparation for Medicine 

..Preparation for Business 

..Preparation for Social Work 

..Mechanical Engineering 

. . Electrical Engineering 

. . Civil Engineering 

. . Chemical Engineering 

. .Science Courses 

. .School of Music 

..General Catalog 

. .Campus Views 

..Expenses 

. . Application for Admission 

To 



Signed 



G. G. PAINTER, '17, Secretary Printers of the Alumni Monthly 

Lne Sun Printing Q? Binding Co., Inc. 

Designers and Proaucers of 

DISTINCTIVE PRINTING 

Booklets, Catalogues, Direct-by-Mail Advertising, Office Forms, Etc. 

Sun Building, WiUiamsport, Pa. 



16 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



COMMERCIAL ADVANCE CORPORATION 
ORGANIZED BY BUCKNELL ALUMNI 

The Corporation Will Engage in Commercial Banking, Loaning 

on Assigned Accounts Receivable to Substantial Manufacturers, 

Jobbers and Wholesalers 



Capitalization 



).00 per share $1,000,000 



20,000 shares of 8% cumulative Preferred Stock, non-assessable. Par value 
20,000 shares Common Stock no par value. 

The business of the corporation is usually known as Commercial Banking, the advancing of money on open 
accounts, to responsible wholesalers, jobbers and manufacturers, who guarantee the payment thereof. Upon 
receipt of the proper documents 80% of the face value of the account is advanced, the balance being paid only as 
collections are received. Collection of the accounts is in the hands of the company borrowing the money. 

There is a demand for this kind of service far in excess of the ability of the existing companies to supply. 

The profits are exceedingly satisfactory. Existing companies are paying the required dividends on their 
Preferred stock and earning an additional 257o to 35% on their Common Stock. 

Safety is the keynote of the business. Money is advanced only on the best of security to concerns that 
pass a rigid credit examination. 



Offi 



cers 



LOUIS W. ROBEY, President. 
Director of the Corporation. 
Alumnus of Bucknell University, Class of '04. 
President of the Overbrook Bank, Phila. 
Director of the Parkway Trust Co., Phila. 
Head of Real Estate Law, Temple University, 
Phila. 

JAMES A. TYSON, Vice President. 
Director of the Corporation. 
Alumnus of Bucknell University, Class of '11. 
General Agent, Equitable Life Ins. Co. of Iowa, 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

CHARLES L. KINSLEY, Secretary. 
Director of the Corporation. 
Manager, Geo. H. Buchanan Co., Printers, 
Phila. 

WALTER S. WILCOX, Treasurer and General 
Manager. 
Director of the Corporation. 
Alumnus of Bucknell University, Class of '04. 



For five years Registrar and Business Man- 
ager of Bucknell. 

For five years Registrar and Business Manager 
of Bucknell. 

Treasurer of Richards Manufacturing Corpor- 
ation, Phila. 

Lecturer in Department of Commerce, Temple 
University, Phila. 

O. J. McNITT. 

Director of the Corporation. 
Bucknell University, Class of '03. 

Manufacturer. 

Wholesale Producer of Furnace Limestone, Har- 
risburg, Pa. 

JOSEPH CHARLESTON. 

Director of the Corporation. 
Manufacturer, Phila. 

WM. A. PURKS. 

Director of the Corporation. 

Heating and Plumbing Engineer, Phila. 



Subscription Terms 



One share of Preferred Stock and one share of Common Stock are being sold for a limited time at S60.00 
per block, payable $10.00 with the subscription, and the balance $10.00 per month. 
For more complete information address 

WALTER S. WILCOX, Treas., 

201 Fuller Bldg., 10 South 18th St., 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



Invest for Safety and Income. 

Invest with those who are known to you. 

Salesman wanted to sell stock of this corporation, 



WOMAN'S EDITION 



Bucknell Alumni Mon 




Vol.V 




Lewisburg, Pa., April, 1921 


No. 7 




75th Anniversary Commencment 

June 11-15, 1921 

Be I'here 






■ *^^I^^B^^^^''''i'?^'''^'^'Si'-^ "'^ ' y? " \ r^^^^^T 




F ^i.<40^'^SimfKKtk ■^'>.-- ■.■ 




--^t>' ' m^wmm 


11 








Left 
and Instr 
Larison, 
Bell, His 


INSTITUTE FACULTY 1895 

to right, standing — Minnie Gould, Voice; Elizabeth C. Eddelman, Latin and German; Elysee Avirag 
umental Music and Romance Languages. Seated — Juliet Aiken, Instrumental Music; Mrs. KatI 
Principal, and Instructor in Literature; Harriet Clare Armitage, English, Elocution, and Gymnast 
.ory and English. Front Row — Candace Wood, Drawing and Painting. 


net. Vocal 
lerine B. 
ics; Eliza 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



Bucknell Alumni Monthly 

LEO L. ROCKWELi,, '07, 
Editor 
ANNE WHITE GALBRAITH, '07, 
Editor WomanV Edition 

Published monthly during the college 
year by the Bucknell University 
Alumni Association. 

Entered as second-class mail matter 
at the Postoffice at Lewisburg, Pa., 
under the act of Congress, March 3, 
1879. 

Annual subscription to non-members, 
$2.00. 

To life members under the SIO plan, 
$1.50. 

To life members under the new plan, 
it is sent gratis. 

To annual members under the new 
plan, subscription is included in the 
annual dues. 

Checks should be made payable to 
Frank M. Simpson, Treas. 



"THE REGULARS" 



In attempting a Woman's Edition of 
the Buckneil Alumni Monthly those 
most concerned want first of all to bow 
to the right, to bow to the left and say, 
"Greetings, comrades, and good mor- 
row! " 

In trying to limit the material ap- 
pearing here to matters pertaining only 
to women we have been just as hamper- 
ed as the real editor would be were he to 
attempt to shut out from regular edi- 
tions, personals, articles and editorials 
that refer to us. 

For the real Bucknell fabric may be 
said to have feminine warp and mas- 
culine woof, if it be permitted to old 
grads. to use queer "mixed-up" figures 
that are forbidden to undergraduates. 
At any rate, the idea is there, the co- 
operation and mutual dependence of 
the men and women of Bucknell are 
both important, if Alma Mater is to 
hold her high place. 

Special thanks are due to the kindly 
offices of Mrs. Gundy, Mrs. Rockwell, 
Ida Luchsinger, Mrs. Theiss and every- 
body else who sent in any material for 
this issue. 

Two things at least this experience 
has taught us: first that there really are 
folks who heed the copy-book maxims 
of our youth, since any evidences of 

1 

SEMITES OF YE OLDEN DAYS 

Be ye hereby notified that the 
annual alumnae business meeting 
will be held at the Evangelical 
Church, of Lewisburg, at eleven- 
thirty, Tuesday morning, June the 
fourteenth. This meeting, as usual, 
will be followed by luncheon at 
twelve-thirty. Tickets will be one 
dollar. 

Out-of-town-folk kindly send 
names to the secretary, Miss Carrie 
Foresman, of Lewisburg, at earliest 
convenience. 

Why not let us make this reunion, 
in memory of the days of Auld Lang 
Syne, the liiggest and best we have 
ever had in "old Lewisburg Town?" 



haste that may be apparent to you in 
this edition are due to the too literal 
interpretation that modern printers are 
threatening to put upon one of the most 
frequently quoted of those maxims, 
"Strike while the iron's hot". 

Second, our hats, spring and summer, 
tailored or bedecked with flowers, are 
"off" to the regular editor, for we have 
a glimmering now of what his "regular 
job" is in putting this paper before us 
each month. Worse than that he has had 
to stand back of us, coaxing, cajoling, 
prodding (gently, to be sure) or this 
edition would never have seen the light 
of day. And having said that much we 
ask the Freshman in the front row, the 
one with the megaphone, to lead us in 
a real B. U. yell, ending with "The 
Regulars! " 

(•>- 

ALUMNI OPINION 



Madam Editor: 

It seems to me that the Women's Is- 
sue offers a timely opportunity for rais- 
ing the question of the relation of 
alumnae to the proposed reorganization 
of the Alumni Association. 

At present there is an Alumnae Asso- 
ciation, which, I believe, confines its 
activities to an annual luncheon at com- 
mencement time. At least I have never 
heard of any other activities. Just 
what the relation of the women to the 
present Alumni Association is I am sure 
I have never clearly known. I know 
Mrs. Gundy was for a long time secre- 
tary, and I believe Mrs. Theiss has an 
important committee at the present 
time, but most of the women are very 
hazy about it and have little interest 
in it. 

If now the Alumni Association is to 
undergo a reorganization looking to a 
broadening of its activities, it seems to 
me the women have a choice between 
two courses of action. Either they 
should become a part of the general 
Alumni Association, on an equal basis 
with the men, and with a definite recog- 
nition of their particular interests, or 
they should reshape the Alumnae As- 
sociation into a working organization, 
at least to the extent of federating the 
existing local clubs and forming a cen- 
tral agency to coordinate their work. 

For my part, I believe the former to 
be the logical move. If a full-time sec- 
retary is employed, he or she (and why 
shouldn't it be she?) could look after 
the general interests of all Bucknellians, 
and committees of the Association 
could take care of the particular in- 
terests of the women. 

One other point I should like to dis- 
cuss. In case such action is taken, 
should not some allowance be made in 
the fee for an "AU-Bucknell" family, 
i. e., one in which both husband and 
wife are Bucknellians. Would it not 
be possible to offer a "family-rate", say 
of three dollars for annual membership, 
or thirty-five for life membership, in 
each case to cover the subscription for 
one "Alumni Monthly" for the family? 
It would help some of us in saving up 
college fees for future Bucknell freshmen 
if such a scheme were adopted. 

I think these problems should be 
worked out and settled at the coming 
Commencement. With all due respect 
to the men, I believe the women are 



more wide-awake than they to the is- 
sues which will engage loyal Bucknel- 
lians during the next few years, and I 
am very anxious that we have a chan- 
nel through which to make our knowl- 
edge and interest effective. 

Humbly submitted. 

Uxor Bucnellensis. 
® 

IN RETROSPECT 



A writer in the Bucknell Mirror of 
February, 1905, described the early 
campus with its "neat drab-colored pal- 
ing fence" shielding a row of struggling 
Arbor-vitae that optimistic planters 
expected to develop into a fine hedge. 
This was in the 60's when some of the 
first girls attended the "University 
Female Institute", at Lewisburg. But 
in spite of its perfectly good Latin root 
the Arbor-vitae slowly withered away. 

In place of this weakling growth a 
high board fence next served to set the 
limits to the "Insteetoot" campus along 
Loomis street. Father Time, however, 
aided and abetted by strong and reck- 
less young hands, disposed of this dis- 
figurement sometime late in the SO's. 

In its wake followed the Institute 
garden, with its quince trees, beneath 
which asparagus beds were wont to 
flourish; ancient peach trees, that yield- 
ed no fruit, lusty grape vines and wild 
blackberry bushes. 

To take their place came, among 
other innovations, the Reading railroad, 
synonomous, — so far as a newer and 
larger Bucknell was concerned — with 
Progress, writ large, led with a capital. 

But not even Mrs. Larison and her 
young charges of other years would 
care to change either "Sem" or campus 
of today with those of yesterday, nor 
these days with those that are no more. 
Yet a kindly warmth of feeling, a 
mutual love for all that was and is and 
shall be Bucknell in some subtle way 
links 1865 and 1921. If you doubt it 
read this bit of sentiment written by a 
girl of 1907 for a former women's edi- 
tion of the Mirror. Her room was a 
tiny one at the head of the stairs on 
second floor, Main Building. 

JANE 

In my little room in Main Building 

On one of the old window panes. 
Are written, I think with a diamond. 

Several old-fashioned names. 
But one among them I fancy 

Better than all the rest; 
It's quaint and very old-fashioned — 

(But old-fashioned names are best). 

Of all the names that the diamond 

Engraved on my window pane, 
The one that I like best — I'll confess it, 

Is simply old-fashioned "Jane". 
A long, long time it has been th«re; 

For Jane also engraved the date, 
And after her name, the diamond 

Wrote "eighteen sixty-eight". 

I often sit here and wonder: 

"What sort of girl was my Jane?" 
I always picture her dainty 

And quaint, like her dainty, quaint 
name. 
Little friend Jane, did you like to peep 

From your curtain of purest white. 
To watch the men building bonfires 

In the deepest gloom of the night? 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



Did you know the road down the river. 

And the one past the willows, too? 
Did you like to go 'round the "Four- 
mile", 

In spring when the skies were blue? 
Dear Jane, with your quaint little hoop- 
skirts, 

And funny, tight little curls — 
Did you ever go walking in June-time 

With — well, not with one of the girls? 

(Years have passed by since then, Jane, 

But let me whisper true — 
Times didn't change so very much. 

We're all just about like you! ) 
Goodby, little girl, I must leave you. 

For the night is growing late. 
But all through my sleep I'll be dream- 
ing 

Of my Jane, of sixty-eight. 
® 

Heard in Passing 

An interesting bit of conversation 
took place at the Women's College last 
week. It ran something like this. 

Girl Student — "I've just been reading 
a serial story with the description of a 
college that sounded for all the world 
like Bucknell. If I had taken pencil 
and notebook and started out to de- 
scribe the 'Sem' I couldn't make it 
sound any more natural and true to 
life". 

Dean Carey — "Perhaps it was an 
alumna of the college. Do you remem- 
ber the name?" 

Student — "I think it was Ida Wil- 
liams Rea". 

And so it was. Ida. has been writ- 
ing consistently for about ten years. 
As consistently, that is, as the mother 
of two lively little girls can write. Per- 
sonally, we have often wondered 
whether she did not have to do much 
of her early typing with a baby on her 
lap. She has found a steady market 
for her work in the Youth's Companion, 
Sunday School publications and numer- 
ous other papers. This is one of the 
many, many instances where Bucknell 
has given her children inspiration and 
confidence which has later come back 
to her in honor to her name. 



Tiie Coming of the College 

Woman at Bucknell 



-®- 



A Bucknell Wife 



An old grad who visited the hill re- 
cently quite unwittingly contributed, 
this item to the Woman's Issue. He 
was relating a conversation with his 
good wife, which we report, as nearly as 
we can, as he told it. « 

Grad — "Yes, I feel very kindly toward 
Bucknell; Bucknell did a lot for me. 
The work I got about the hill enabled 
me to get through with my course; and 
I owe much of my success to my Buck- 
nell training. What do you think we 
ought to do for the Endowment Drive?" 

Wife — "Well, what do you think?" 

Grad— "Why, I should think I could 
give $50 a year". 

Wife — "Yes, you could do that with- 
out feeling it". 

Grad — "Yes, I think I could". 



it? 



Wife— "Well, then, why not double 



And he did. 



-®- 



Frank Davis, '11, had an article in 
"School and Society" for September 18, 
entitled "A School Bank". 



(Reprinted from the Bucknell Mirror, 

feoruary, 1905). 

While it is wise to keep our eyes fixed 
steaalasuy on the heights we wish to 
reach, it may be profitable sometimes 
to look back over the traveled ways 
behind us. 

ine problem of the education of 
women may be looked upon as only one 
pnase of tne great woman movement. 
Women has asserted herself as an in- 
uividual and her c-aim is finally for an 
equal selfhood with man. The past 
tun ty years have brought great changes, 
i here has been a period of rapid growth 
and, as usual, growth has been attend- 
ed by self-consciousness. The endless 
hive of women's societies, women's 
buildings at our expositions, special edi- 
tions ot papers and magazines by women 
and devoted exclusively to women's in- 
terests — these are eviaences of a phe- 
nomenal self-consciousness. We shall 
all be glad when this painful stage is 
over and we have attained to fullness 
of stature, when the interests peculiar 
to our sex may be lost sight of in the 
larger human interests which concern 
us ail. When we can see that the 
"woman's cause is man's", that sex, like 
occupation and social position, is an 
element in the environment of life, like 
them it is not life. 

In 1885 Bucknell first conferred the 
bachelor's degree upon a woman. Miss 
Chella Scott (Mrs. G. W. Beale). She 
had not taken the full college course 
With the class, however, having been 
admitted to college the autumn before 
her graduation. 

The class graduated in 1887, during 
its four years' history enrolled four 
women, Annie L. Hay, Lizzie Laning, 
Frances Rush and Mary Rebecca 
Schreyer. Miss Rush and Miss Schrey- 
er completed the course and were gradu- 
ated. 

In the autumn of 1887 three women 
were admitted, Eveline Stanton to the 
Sophomore class, Harriet Pitts and 
Ophelia Staufft to the Freshman class. 
Margaret Evans had entered before as 
a special student. She became identi- 
fied with the class of 1891 and was 
graduated with it. Eveline Stanton 
completed the course and was gradu- 
ated in 1890. Harriet Pitts dropped out 
of college at the end of her Junior year, 
while Ophelia Staufft was out for a 
time, but returned and was graduated 
with the class- of 1892. 

From thac time on co-education 
dared to be a question and became an 
established fact. 

Women were never formally and of- 
ficially admitted to Bucknell. If there 
was any official act on the part of the 
board of trustees the public never knew 
of it. The attitude of those in author- 
ity was not very encouraging, still it 
was not interpreted by the women 
themselves to be in opposition. 

There may have been a suggestion 
now and then that the desire for the 
higher education on the part of woman 
was a whim, in which she was to be 
humored, rather than a real hunger and 
thirst which ought to be satisfied. For- 
tunately the women did not quibble 
aboi*t whether they were wanted or tol- 
erated at Bucknell. They were getting 
what they wanted and little did they 



care whether the president and faculty 
welcomed them or not. 

Of course, there was a good deal of 
opposition to co-education on the part 
of the students. Bitter abuse was some- 
times indulged in. Some members of 
the faculty were wordy with their ob- 
jections and the women suffered the 
hardships which always attend pioneer- 
ing in a cause, but the people who had 
any power over the issue were fair and 
even generous toward the women. 

During the years when co-education 
was making a beginning at Bucknell 
William Bucknell was president of the 
Board of trustees. He was a man with 
strong opinions and his opinions went 
very far toward shaping the policy of 
the University during the time he held 
office. He warmly favored allowing the 
women to enter the college. Those who 
knew him well assert that he was in- 
fluenced to this policy by his belief that 
a woman as well as a man should have 
an education if she wanted it, and that 
economic reasons led him to favor co- 
educational institutions rather than 
separate colleges for women. He had 
observed the Western colleges where 
women were admitted, and the growth 
and prosperity of these, particularly 
Northwestern, convinced him that co- 
education was not such a deadening in- 
fluence. 

Mrs. Larison was at the head of the 
department for women. She read right- 
ly the signs of the times in those first 
days of co-education and became its 
champion. Had she opposed it she 
might have delayed for several years 
the final outcome. Her advice was 
sought and followed when the problems 
incident to pioneering became too per- 
plexing. 

The praise or the blame of co-educa- 
tion at Bucknell cannot be placed upon 
any one person exclusively. Two presi- 
dents and our acting president were 
concerned in it, but to explain the 
forces which made co-education a fact 
at Bucknell would be to explain the eco- 
nomic and industrial tendencies of our 
time, to explain that large drift of 
things which lies outside the human 
consciousness. — Eveline Stanton Gundy. 
® ■ 

Bucknell Song 

Appropriately enough, the Women's 
Issue contains a song submitted by two 
Bucknell women. The words are by 
Alif Stephens, '01, and the music by 
Ruth Stephens Porter, '05. The song 
is dedicated to that staunch Bucknel- 
lian, Dr. Leroy Stephens, of the class 
of 1868. 

The collaborators' who have been for 
some time working together in this 
field, having published last fall a school 
song-book entitled, "Songs of the Sea- 
sons", have tried to make the song sing- 
able. It covers a range of only one 
octave in the soprano, the range and 
progressions being simple. 

_® 

Captain C. F. Brandt, '21, of Sharon, 
has picked a team from the winners of 
the tournament held last fall, including 
J. C. Koch, '23. of Harrisburg; John 
Purnell, '23, of Lewisburg; and Robert 
Gray, '24. Other candidates may ob- 
tain a place by challenging and defeat- 
ing any of these men. 



2 BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 

........... .-.-.... . . • — .-►..-.-►.^".•■.^— * ."•• — . — •"- — •"-"• — ►**.►..-..--."...> 



About the Hill 



THE EDDY MEETINGS 



.."...."."•".".-•"•"•-•"•"•"•■••"•"•"•"••'•"•** 



...«.»•».-»...«.».»•«.»...«.....•••••.»•"•••••••"•■• 



...»..........■......*.".".".■■.......♦»* 



It would be foolish at the present 
time to attempt to prophesy the ulti- 
mate effect of the coming of Sherwood 
Eddy to Bucknell. Suffice it to say 
that Mr. Eddy's three-day stay was a 
revelation to all the college. This wide- 
ly-heralded Y. M. C. A. worker is one 
of the few men who exceed the expecta- 
tions placed on them. Combining in- 
tellectual breadth and wide tolerance 
with unmistakable sincerity and deep 
spiritual fervor, he makes an appeal al- 
most irresistible to college people. Com- 
manding the respect of all hearers by 
these qualities, he hits out straight 
from the shoulder in his effort to bring 
home to every individual the signifi- 
cance of the religious factor in life. His 
earnestness and vigor in attacking the 
present-day problems of the individual, 
the community, the nation, and the 
world, gripped the Bucknell student- 
body in a manner unparalleled in the 
recent history of the college. 

In his first address on "The World 
Problem", given to the men of the col- 
lege in Bucknell Hall, March 8, Mr. 
Eddy summed up his view of world 
needs as he had seen them in his recent 
visit to twenty countries, in the phrase 
"Bread, Peace, God". In his later talks 
before the entire college in Commence- 
ment Hall he brought these world needs 
constantly closer home to his hearers 
in a series: "The National Problem", 
"Campus Problems", "The Problem of 
Religion", and "The Personal Problem". 
Every address was logically thought 
out and carefully presented as an in- 
tellectual appeal. Each was illustrated 
with a wealth of concrete illustrations 
from Eddy's own experience. Drawing 
the lines ever closer, in his final talks 
he brought home the necessity of the 
choice by every individual of the ideal- 
istic or the materialistic life, and show- 
ed how the idealistic life is inevitably 
bound up with the religion of Jesus. 

The immediate effect of the meetings 
was evident in the student chapel held 
the day after his departure. It is re- 
ported as follows in "The Bucknellian": 
"The crowning event of the Sher- 
wood Eddy campaign was the chapel 
service held in Commencement Hall 
Friday morning by the students only, 
faculty excluded. Led by 'Die k' 
Mason, Senior president, the meeting 
resolved itself into something like an 
old-fashioned 'experience meeting'. 
No less than twenty students arose 
and told frankly what they had re- 
ceived from the addresses of Sherwood 
Eddy. Two worth-while reforms were 
discussed. One was an honor system 
of examinations. The other was a new 
system of 'Co-educational Student Gov- 
ernment', aimed to exclude 'rotten 
politics' from the circles of Bucknell. 
President Mason expressed a desire to 
see a more democratic form of student 
government in which the power of one 
man, the Senior president, is more re- 
stricted. He will appoint a committee 
of leading men and women of the col- 



lege to formulate a constitution for such 
a government. Announcement of the 
results of this action will be published 
in the near future". 

As a further result of the meetings, 
classes in Bible study and social-in- 
dustrial study were organized. Fifty- 
one students signed up for the former, 
one hundred and thirty-five for the lat- 
ter. Forty-five students signed up for 
summer work in industrial plants, to be 
combined with a seminar study of the 
social problems involved in the present 
industrial situation. 

® 

Glee Club's Eastern Trip 




The Glee Club left Lewisburg Mon- 
day, March 28, 1921, and arrived the 
same afternoon at Pitman, N. J. The 
concert was held in the Park Theatre of 
Pitman and was well attended. Among 
the Alumni present were Mr. and Mrs. 
J. Gurney Sholl, and Mr. and Mrs. Ed- 
ward O. Clark, all of whom entertain- 
ed some of the boys during the time 
they were in Pitman. 

The following morning the club went 
on to Vineland. In the afternoon it 
sang a few numbers in the High School 
and in the evening gave a concert in 
the Baptist Church, where the concert 
was held last year. Owing to the good 
reputation made by the club the pre- 
vious year, the house was packed. Paul 
E. Harding was taken sick and 
forced to remain in Vineland for two 
days, and then came directly home. 
This caused a rearrangement of the 
stringed trio. The club was well taken 
c<ire of by Prof. Weidner, Superinten- 
dent of Schools of Vineland, who has a 
daughter attending Bucknell. In the 
evening after the concert, a dance was 
held for the club at the home of Morris 
Troost, ex-'17, at which T. C. WiUiams, 
'19, was present. Among the Alumni at 
the concert were Edwin Reber, '10, and 
Dr. Clement B. Lowe, '65. 

The following morning the club en- 
trained for Bridgeton, N. J. It was met 
at the station by M. K. Mohler, '21, 
and taken to the church. In the after- 
noon it sang a few numbers in the local 
High School, at which Miss Elthera 
Corson, '20, is a teacher. The concert of 
the evening was very good, even better 
than that of the previous year. 

The succeeding morning the club 
started for West Chester and landed 
there about 2:00 P. M, It went im- 
mediately to the High School where it 
sang several numbers. In the evening 
the club was entertained at supper by 
the youngladies of the Baptist Church. 
The concert was given in the Century 
Club building and was a decided suc- 
cess. 

Rev. E. C. Kunkle fostered the con- 
cert at West Chester and Dr. Walker 
presented the boys to the audience. 
Among Alumni present were Miss 
Agnes Hoffman, D. W. Korth, Eliza- 
beth Patterson, Mr. and Mrs. E» C. 
Kunkle and Dr. and Mrs. Charles 
Walker. 



With this issue the Monthly institutes 
the Bucknell Book-Shelf, in which pub- 
lications by Bucknell folk will be 
noticed. 

It is hoped that the Alumni will co- 
operate by sending us word of books or 
articles by themselves, or other Buck- 
nellians. Only by such general cooper- 
ation, can the Book-Shelf be made as 
complete and valuable as we should like 
to have it. 

In the case of books, it is planned 
to have them commented on at some 
length, and it is requested that authors 
suggest to their publishers the advis- 
ability of sending the Monthly a re- 
viewing copy for this purpose, or send 
one themselves. An effort will be made 
to have the review written in each case 
by some specialist in the field in which 
the publication appears. 

In this way there will be accumulated 
gradually in the Alumni Office ma- 
terial to fill a real "Book-Shelf", which 
in the course of time will constitute a 
valuable collection of very great in- 
terest to all Bucknellians. 

While the principal aim of this de- 
partment will be to keep the Alumni 
in touch with the current output of 
their fellow-Bucknellians, older publi- 
cations of distinct value will from time 
to time be considered. 
* « * 

The January "Garden Magazine" 
contains an article "Under His Own 
Vine and Fig Tree", by Lewis E. Theiss, 
'02. Three of the illustrations are pic- 
tures of the Theiss home near Muncy. 
Lewis and Mary Theiss write in the 
February "Peoples' Home Journal", on 
"Our Remodeled Fruit Trees". In the 
February "Pictorial Review" they write 
on "What Shall We Raise In Our Gar- 
dens?" They also have an article in 
the February "Good House-keeping", 
entitled "When You Build Your Home". . 
» » * 

H. B. Weaver, '14, of Pittsburgh, has 
a very readable article entitled "Dis- 
tribution and Growth of Pennsylvania 
High Schools" in "School and Society" 
for March 19. In brief compass he gives 
a survey of the great increase in the 
number of high schools and in the 
actual and proportional high school at- 
tendance during the years 1880-1915. 

For college people it is interesting to 
learn that according to Mr. Weaver's 
statistics there were in 1880 four, in 1890 
twelve, in 1915 sixty-seven pupils in 
high school to every thousand in the 
public schools; in 1880 two, in 1890 
four, in 1915 twelve students in college 
to every thousand in the public schools. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



•••»•..•»••••• A 



About the Hill 



^« .«»a..a««««»*«i 



•"••••••••••• 



»«»•»•»•»■•« 



WHO? 



Who is the secretary of your class? 
Who works up your class reunions? 
Who sends in "Personals" to the Alumni 
Monthly? Who feels it to be his obli- 
gation to keep in touch with all his 
classmates? Who will represent your 
c'ass in the new Alumni Executive 
Council, in case the new organization 
ca'ls for class representation? 

The fact that many alumni would be 
quite unable to answer any of these 
questions points to a weak spot in our 
alumni organization. Have you ever 
said: "Yes, I'd like to go back for Com- 
mencement this year. It's my reunion 
year, but I don't know whether any of 
the class will be there. No one seems 
to be working it up?" Too often it has 
been true that no one has worked it 
up. No one has felt that it was his to 
do. 

For some weeks the Alumni Office has 
been making an effort to find out the 
exact state of things in the various 
classes. By inquiry from local mem- 
bers of the classes and others, the names 
of the secretaries of the following class- 
es have been learned to be as indicated. 
The Alumni Office would be grateful 
for information concerning the classes 
not included in this list. 

Reunion Classes for 1921 

1871. Professor William E. Martin, 

Lewisburg, Pa. 

1881. Rev. F. W. Kramer, Flora, Ind. 

1891. ? 

1896. Dr. Mary Wolfe, Pennsylvania 
Village, Laurelton, Pa. 

1901. Mrs. Llewellyn Phillips, Lewis- 
burg, Pa. 

1906. Romain C. Hassrick, 1028 Land 
Title Bldg., Philadelphia, Pa. 

1911. Rev. N. K. Grossman, Coates- 
ville. Pa. 

1916. '-'"Dayton Ranck, Narrow Fabric 
Co , Reading, Pa. 
Other Classes 

1872. Prof. William C. Bartol, Lewis- 

burg, Pa. 
1880. Dr. S. Lewis Ziegler. 

1884. Hon. E. L. Tustin, 306-311 

Crozer Bldg., Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

1885. William P. Beaver, Orange, 

N. J. 
1888. Rev. W. H. Clipman, Mifflin- 

burg. Pa. 
1890. Mrs. C. A. Gundy, Lewisburg, 

Pa. 

1892. Dr. E. G. Gourson, ? 

1893. Pro{. E. M. Heim, ? 

1894. George E Deppen, Esq. 

1895. Prof. N. E. Davis, Lewisburg, 

Pa. 

1897. Willard M. Bunnell, Esq. 

1898. Mrs. M. L. Drum, Lewisburg, 

Pa. 

1899. Prof. F. G. Ballentine, Lewis- 

burg, Pa. 

1900. Rush H. Kress, New York City. 
1902. Prof. M. L. Drum, Lewisburg, 

Pa. ? 

(Conunued on Page Six) 



Representative Undergraduates 

Miss Marguerite T. Lotte, '21, a sister 
of Walter Lotte, '14, is this year's Y. W. 
G. A. President. 

She is a graduate of the Paterson, 
N. J , High School. In college she has 
served on the Y. W. C. A. cabinet, the 




Miss Marguerite Teresa Lotte 
Student Executive Committee, and has 
served as Girls' Glass President. She 
was the winner of the Freshman Latin 
and* Mathematical Prize. 
* * * 

Miss Elizabeth Weidner, '21, is Presi- 
dent of the Mathematics Club. This 
exceptional honor has fallen to her for 
her unusual ability in mathematics, in 
which she is majoring. 

She is a graduate of the Vineland, 
N. J., High School. In college she has 




Association. She is a member of the 

Girls' Glee Club. 

* * * 

Miss Matilda E. Bell, '21, has Ijeen 
chosen this year for the responsible task 
of guiding the destinies of Student Gov- 
ernment at the Women's College. 

She is a graduate of Clearfield High 
School. In college she has taken part 




Miss Matilda Bell 

in the Freshman Declamation Contest 
and the Elocution Contest. She is a 
member of Frill and Frown, has served 
as Junior Girls' Secretary, and Vice- 
President of Student Government. 
* * * 

Miss Emily Devine is Women's Class 
President of the Senior class. 

She entered Bucknell from Dunmore 
High School. She is a member of the 
Girls' Glee Club, and Frill and Frown, 




Elizabeth Van Scoyoc Weidner 
served on the Y. W. C. A. cabinet, the 
Student Executive Committee, and the 
Executive Board of the Girls' Athletic 



Emily Kathryn Devine 

the Girls' Dramatic Club. She has won 
her gymnasium "B", and been a mem- 
ber of the Bucknellian staff. Last year 
she was Women's Class Vice-President. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



•%i..«H».4M««»t.a*.*..»..*>.«..»»«»a>^>*»»i 



Bucknell of Today 



A VISION 



ALMA MATER. 

SPIRIT OF THE FUTURE. 

VOICES OF THE PRESENT. 



ALMA MATER. The future crowds 
close upon us. Each step forward push- 
es us into a maze of clamoring demands. 
Our usefulness threatens to be stopped, 
choked by overwhelming obstacles. 
And now — alas! — is the very season 
when a sorrowing world most needs us. 
Who is to come to the rescue? 

SPIRIT OF THE FUTURE. Why 
not thy women, O Alma Mater? This 
is the day of their triumph. It is but 
the beginning of their achievements. 
Why not call them to thine aid at this, 
the critical hour? 

AUMA MATER. It is good. Buck- 
nell has been blessed with women, fine- 
spirited, true-hearted. Let us turn to 
them. Women of Bucknell, where are 
ye now? 

FIRST VOICE OF THE PRES- 
ENT. Here, O Beloved Mother, in the 
school room. Here we are spending our 
lives in passing on the knowledge and 
experience gained in thy sacred halls, as 
well as that which is greater than these, 
the blessing of human interest. • It is 
this which has broadened us and en- 
abled us to brighten and enlighten the 
lives of hundreds of those about us. ■ 
May we ever be worthy of the trust. 

SECOND VOICE. Here in the pro- 
fessions from which those of our sex 
were formerly barred. Thanks to thy 
teaching, the confidence inspired by thy 
guidance, we are taking our place on 
the vast human stage. We are doing 
our part in lifting the unfortunates of 
humanity upward and onward. We owe 
it to thee to succeed. Great Mother. 

THIRD VOICE. Here in the home, 
the blessed American home. Here, as 
wives and mothers, we are carrying on. 
Our litt'e domain is suffused with the 
peace born of our own struggles to be 
worthy of thee while the love for our 
own we find intensified by the bigger 
love for all, which we have learned of 
thee. And, Mother Dearest, is it not 
mete to add that many of us owe to 
thee the very husbands whose love and 
protection bring us daily companionship 
and happiness? For all these we thank 
thee. Alma Mater. 

FOURTH VOICE. Here in the 
world of business are we. Here we are 
living the principles of uprightness and 
honesty acquired when we sat at thy 
feet. No less are we living in the light 
of sincerity and truth as evinced and 
insiiired by thine own spirit. Our suc- 
cess is thine, O Mother! 

ALMA MATER. It is good. My 
daughters have not forgotten me. I 
still live in their hearts and memories. 
Were I to ask them aught, they would 
respond. Women of Bucknell, I fain 
would know at what my gifts are 
valued. At what price would ye sell 
that which ye have gained from me? 
VOICES IN UNISON. It is impos- 



sible. For no price would we sell that 
which has come from thee. 

ALMA MATER. Ye say my gift is 
priceless. No sum can purchase it. 
Why, then, good daughters, what would 
ye do to show me gratitude? What 
proof thereof? 

VOICES IN UNISON. Only point 
the way. Our hearts and hands are 
with thee. 

ALMA MATER. Then help me 
solve the problem of my future. Help 
me build and grow. My halls no longer 
hold all who would come. Well nigh 
an hundred of your younger sisters 
knocked at my doors last year — and 
were denied an entrance. There was no 
room. It was not so for you. Suppose 
it had been— What joys, what profits 
and what friendships had been lost! 
For the sake of those who now come 
pleading as ye once did plead to show 
appreciation for your priceless gift re- 
ceived, help ye me now! Your heart 
and hands are with me, say ye? Then 
will your purse be likewise! — V. C. 
R., '11. 

® 

Home Economics 



Student Government 



The course in Home Economics was 
introduced at Bucknell in 1914. As 
first planned, the course was but two 
years in length and aimed to give the 




Dean Carey 

girls a thorough knowledge of cookery 
and to prepare them to teach Domestic 
Science or for work as dietitians. At 
the end of the two years a certificate 
was granted. In 1917 two years were 
added to the course. The added years 
were designed from the Junior and 

(Continued on Page Six) 



Those of us who attended Bucknell 
in the good old days were so accustom- 
ed to hanging onto the skirts of the 
teachers — or, perhaps, avoiding them 
when it best suited our purpose — that 
the introduction of the newest thing in 
government as already practised at 
other colleges, for a long time seemed 
very remote, if not, indeed, somewhat 
visionary and impractical. 

But a bit of leaven found its way in- 
to the old "Sem". Little by little, with 
such live spirits as Olive Cooper and 
Sallie MacSparran to stir it around, the 
bit grew until it affected the whole 
lump. And in the years '12 and '13, a 
revolution — albeit a most peaceful and 
welcome little affair — swept out the old 
way and established the new. 

The change was pleasing to the 
teachers, for whom the system of es- 
pionage had become very irksome as 
well as for the students who felt that 
by the time they had achieved the posi- 
tion of college women they must surely 
have enough backing of good sense and 
judgment to govern themselves wisely 
and well. Of course there would be 
"weak sisters" to be disciplined, but was 
there not a chance that such discipline 
coming from contemporaries might not 
be more sane, more just and more ac- 
ceptable than was strictly possible from 
those higher up? 

It was a chance. The girls took it 
eagerly. If there have been any re- 
grets, they have come from the girl who 
preferred to have no responsibility, who 
would rather run the risk of being 
caught by the teacher than exercise her 
poor, little, under-nourished conscience. 
Or perhaps there may have been sighs 
of regret from the brave, fine-spirited 
girl who has served on the student gov- 
erning body and has sometimes felt the 
strain of bearing another's burdens al- 
most too heavy. In either of these ex- 
tremes, who will say that the self-dis- 
cipline and responsibilty, however 
burdensome, have not been of the type 
to uplift and strengthen beyond any- 
thing the old system could offer? 

The Student Executive Board, or 
"Student Ex." for short, is presided 
over by a senior elected by popular 
vote. The board, consisting of two 
seniors, two juniors and one sophomore, 
meets once each week to consider vari- 
ous problems and disciplinary meas- 
ures. It has power to impose all punish- 
ments even to expulsion. The whole 
body of women students meets once a 
month to conduct general business. 

In the nine years of its existence, the 
Student Government has more than 
justified itself. It has proved to be ef- 
ficient for it has been human, just and, 
where duty demanded it, inexorable. 
And all of this has proved that Buck- 
nell sirls of today make the fine, 
staunch, worth-while women we alum- 
nae like to see starting out to represent 
Alma Mater— V. C. R., '11. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



HILL AND BURG 



Work on the Chemical Laboratory 
addition has progressed rapidly during 
the past few weeks. The foundations 
are complete, and the walls rising 
rapidly. 

•X- ->^ -A- 

Y. W. C. A. elected ofificers early in 
March. Emma Kunkel, of Newberry, 
is president; Esther Fleming, of Pater- 
son, N. J., vice-president; Eleanor Lit- 
tle, of Picture Rocks, secretary; Ara- 
villa Peters, of Grampian, treasurer. 

vv- -X- -X- 

L'Agenda has gone to press and is ex- 
pected to appear early in May. Alumni 
wishing the book should send their 
orders to Hugh D. Kyttle, Kappa Sigma 
House, Lewisburg, Pa. 

The Varsity basketball team defeated 
the "Vultures", a picked team from the 
Inter-fraternity League, by a score of 
37-24. The game was hotly contested, 
but better team-work won in the end 
for Coach Glass's five. 

^- -X- -x- 

The Phi Kappa Psi five won the in- 
ter-fraternity basketball series, defeat- 
ing the Lambda Chi Alpha team in the 
deciding game by the score of 22-20. 
-:c- * -^ 

The Swarthmore debating team de- 
feated the Bucknell team on March 18 
on the question, "Resolved, that labor 
should share in the management of cor- 
porate industry". The Bucknell team 
was composed of Finley Keech, '22, of 
Netcong, N. J.; W. H. Sugden, '22, of 
Wilkes-Barre, and Lawrence M. Kim- 
ball, '23, of Vineland, N. J. 
•X- -X- * 

Fourteen delegates from Bucknell 
were in attendance at the recent Stu- 
dent Volunteer Convention at Lafayette 
College. 

It w'ill be entirely safe for Alumni to 
return to Commencement June 11-15. 
A squad of Pennsylvania State troopers 
has been stationed at Lewisburg. 
» * ■ -x- 

President Hunt served recently as one 
of a committee of four delegated to ap- 
pear before Secretary of State Hughes 
in behalf of victims of religious perse- 
cution in Rumania. 

* * * 

Mr. John C. Kelly, who will be re- 
membered by many Alumni as the long- 
time station agent of the Pennsylvania 
Railroad Company at Lewisburg, was 
retired recently after forty-eight years 
of service with the Pennsylvania. He is 
the father of Edith Kelly Fetherston, 
'05. The Alumni Monthly congratu- 
lates hira on his remarkable record of 
service. 

Among the Bucknellians who passed 
the Easter recess in Lewisburg, were 
Merle Edwards, '03; Laura McGann, 
'11; A. A. Leiser, '98; Charlemange T. 
Wolfe, '10; Emily Lane, '10, and Frank 
Rorabach, '19. 

Professors Burpee and Phillips re- 
moved during the vacation into their 

new residences. 

'X- -X- -s 

President and Mrs Hunt enjoyed the 
Easter recess at Southern Pines, N. C. 

-X- -X- -x- 

A large number of college people took 



Why a Woman Trustee? 



Well, why not? Will you answer 
me that, man? Don't the women 
have the interests of Bucknell at 
heart and aren't they as capable of 
safeguarding them as the men? 
Isn't the appointment of women 
trustees coming to be a general prac- 
tice among coeducational colleges? 
Can't you think right now of several 
Bucknell women who are entirely 
capable of meeting the problems 
which confront the Trustees, with 
clear minds and business judgment? 
Don't you want Bucknell women to 
have the privilege of being admitted 
to membership in the Association of 
Collegiate Alumnae, which is denied 
graduates of any institution in which 
women are discriminated against on 
the faculty and Board of Trustees? 
Won't it-stimulate their interest and 
their loyalty to feel that they are 
specially recognized in this way? 
Can you think of any valid reason, 
why as a principle or as a practice, 
membership should be denied 
women? Well, then, why not? 



part in the presentation of the "Cruci- 
fixion" at the Lutheran Church, March 
20. It was conducted by Hobart 
Brown, '21. 

The annual college catalogs were re- 
ceived late in March and copies have 
been mailed to all the graduates and 
matriculates of the college and gradu- 
ates of the Institute and School of 
Music. If you have not received yours, 
please notify Registrar Clark. 

* -X- * 

The spring vacation was signalized 
by a number of fraternity dances and 
house-parties. 

"Snow flakes", a film showing the 
various stages in the conversion of 
water power into electric power, was 
shown by the Electric Engineering So- 
ciety in Bucknell Hall, March 16. A 
large audience of engineering students 
enjoyed the picture. 

The Alumni Office is putting the fin- 
ishing touches on the Quinquennial 
Catalog, and expects to have it ready 
for distribution late in May. 

^- -X- -A- 

Superintendent Frederick W. Rob- 
bins, '98, of Williamsport, addressed the 
Civic Club of Lewisburg, recently, on 
Modern school training. His address 
was very well received. 



The firm of H. F. Donehower, one of 
the o'dest in Lewisburg, which is now 
conducted by William H. Donehower, 
'06, is making extensive additions to its 
store rooms in preparation for the in- 
troduction of Victro'as and Victor re- 
cords. Some time ago the firm added 
to its wall paper and athletic goods 
lines the Brunswick agency, and with 
the new Victor agency expects to de- 
vote a great deal of attention to this 
end of its business. The display room 
and booths will be modern in every 
respect. 

-X- -X- 'X- 

William C. Walls, '73, gave a Saint 
Patrick's Day dinner to fifty of his 



"Irish" friends, among whom were many 
Bucknellians. 

Eta chapter of Alpha Chi Omega, 
established at Bucknell in 1898, and 
later discontinued, has been re-establish- 
ed, the charter being conferred on the 
Zeta Nu Sorority. The new sorority en- 
tertained representatives of the various 
fraternities at a reception April 2, 

-X- -X- -X- 

John Dietrich, '23, of Reading, has 
been elected basketball captain for next 
year. Varsity letters have been award- 
ed Dietrich, Bihl, Searles, Wilsbach, 
Dayhoff, Bunting and Reamer, man- 
ager. George Mathieson, '22, of Mun- 
hall, has been elected manager for next 
year. The assistant managers will be 
G. R. Rentz, '23, of WiUiamsport; A. 
M. Gehret, '23, of ShiUington; F. U. 
Davis, '23, of West Chester. 
* * -s- 

Manager High Sowers, '22, of Steel- 
ton, is arranging a tennis schedule which 
will include matches with Penn State, 
Swarthmore, and Susquehanna; match- 
es are pending with Lafayette, Mora- 
vian, Pitt, Canegie Tech, Gettysburg, 
and Dickinson. 



-<>>- 



MARRIAGES 



Roberts-Cannert 

William Edward Roberts, of the Class 
of 1904, was married to Miss Annette 
Cannert in the city of New York, Jan- 
uary 15, 1921. They will be at home 
after February 21, at 4 Greenacres 
avenue, Hartsdale, N. Y. 
Maclay-Royer 

Miss Grace V. Royer, of the Class of 
1908, was married March 22, to Mr. 
Robert M. Maclay. The ceremony was 
performed in the Reformed Church of 
Sunbury, the Rev. Charles E. Roth of- 
ficiating. They left after the ceremony 
on a wedding trip to Cuba. 

Pontius-Lawrence 

Mr. Clarence Henry Pontius, '20, was 
married March 29 to Miss Thelma 
Lawrence, at the home of the bride's 
parents in Sunbury. The ceremony 
was performed by Rev. Charles R. 
Bowers, of the Zion Lutheran Church. 

They will be at home after April 14 
at 454 North Fourth street, Sunbury. 

Jenkins-Weiser 

Miss Mary Weiser, ex-'12, was mar- 
ried on April 5, to Mr. Thomas Jenkins, 
at Mifflin, Pa. Mr. and Mrs. Jenkins 
will be at home after June 1 at 910 
Center street, Bethlehem, Pa. 

Mrs. Jenkins is a sister of John Hol- 
man Weiser, of the Class of 1902. 

« 



'Moose" McCormick Manager 



Robert W. Maxwell, sporting editor 
of the Evening Public Ledger, has the 
following to say of Harry E. McCor- 
mick, ex-'04: "Harry 'Moose' McCor- 
mick, the famous pinch-hitter of the 
New York Giants, who gained fame a 
few years ago with his 'Rock-'em-and- 
sock-'em' stuff at critica' periods in the 
ball games, is located in Philadelphia. 
'Moose' is in business here and intends 
to remain permanently. He will prob- 
ably manage one of the semi-pro teams 
around Philadelphia this year. He 
wants to keep in touch with the game". 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



The View Point of 

Men and Women 



"In a co-educational institution", says 
Dr. William Westley Guth, President of 
Goucher, in an article which appeared 
some time ago in the New York Times, 
"everything is done from the viewpoint 
of men, and women receive the sort of 
education that men, who are more en- 
thusiastic about the education of the 
male sex than they are about higher op- 
portunities for women, can give her. 
On the other hand, in a coUeg.e ex- 
clusively for women, everything is done 
from the viewpoint of women. A high- 
er education of a cultural sort is af- 
forded the students, but special atten- 
tion is given to developing initiative, 
responsibility, and keenness of vision, 
and the results are remarkable". 

Far be it from one of the feminine 
gender, one who never hopes to attain 
a doctor's degree or the presidency of 
a college, to take issue with so learned 
a person as the one quoted above. 
However, as in many bodies it is the 
privilege of the minority to make a re- 
port, report be it then, for to this 
woman there appears to be one class 
omitted in the learned doctor's disser- 
tation. 

There are co-educational institutions 
and co-educational institutions, just as 
there are men and men, just as there 
are women and women, and we of 
Bucknell must be pardoned if we claim 
for her a unique position among these 
co-educational institutions. Her position 
may be defined as the golden mean 
so lauded in days long gone by, by one 
Quintus Horatius Flaccus, a man of 
whom we heard much as we sat at the 
feet of Dr. Rockwood, "the stern old 
Roman". 

We claim, and fairly, that the sane 
policy and wisdom exercised by those 
in authority at Bucknell tend to do 
everything from the viewpoint of men 
AND women. All the more, too, will 
this be the case when we, who now ex- 
ercise the right of suffrage, see a repre- 
sentative of our sex sitting upon the 
board of trustees. (We are not trying 
to force this as an issue, we are merely 
mentioning it in passing). 

True we have our engineering depart- 
ments, and our special courses for men, 
but on the other hand we have also 
special courses for women. And best of 
all, we have splendid work to be taken 
by men AND women, standing side by 
side as good comrades, not as antagon- 
ists at all. 

And right here is where our golden 
mean comes into play. Time was when 
the men and women of Bucknell looked 
at each other inimically across class- 
room, haU or chapel; when this little 
man had privileges and this little 
woman had none. But unlike the little 
pig in the nursery rhyme, the woman 
did not cry either "Qui, oui, oui", or 
"Non, non, non", all the way home. She 
quietly set to work to earn some priv- 
ileges, and today they are hers. 

In those o'd days when things were 
done from the viewpoint of men the 
girl students were treated as little girls. 
Today they have grown to woman- 
hood's estate, and enjoy the privileges 
thereof. Gone is the "Sem", the 
"Female Institute", of the olden days, 



and in its place stands "The Woman's 
College! " 

Side by side in chapel, classroom and 
laboratory stand men and women, with 
the ideas and the ideals of men and 
women, but with a kindly something 
that unites them. Some cynic sneers 
and says, "Yes, and a lot of marriages 
are the result! " 

And why not, pray? An official of the 
college who has been collecting material 
on this subject for some time, and that 
too with special reference to our Alma 
Mater, said not long ago that in cases 
where Bucknell men and women have 
married schoolmates from "The Hill", 
a very large proportion of the marriages 
are happy ones. "An almost unap- 
preciable minimum of Bucknell mar- 
riages are unhappy", he said with 
authority. Doesn't that count for a 
lot? 

Visit the classroom and laboratories 
of Bucknell and you will see the stu- 
dents, men and women, mingling on a 
natural basis. They work together, 
play together, learn to know each other 
at a time when they are impressionable, 
it is true, but at a time when they have 
youth, interest, and enthusiasm, quali- 
ties that they almost invariably carry 
with them to their work in the world. 

A group of college women, including 
several from Bucknell, were once taking 
a hike together, talking over all manner 
of things dear to the hearts of women. 
As they walked one of the Bucknel- 
lians spied a flower with which she was 
unfamiliar. Turning to her neighbor, a 
graduate of a woman's college, she said, 
"Martha, you specialize in botany; tell 
me the name of that flower, please". 

"Oh", replied the graduate of the 
famous college, "I don't know the 
names of flowers, I specialized in cel- 
lular structure! " 

And like the boy in the famous old 
tale of the key flower, the others 
thought that she had "taken what she 
wanted, but had forgotten the best en- 
tirely". 

' ® 

Who? 

(Continued from Page Three) 

1903. Prof. Walter K. Rhodes, Lew- 

isburg, Pa. 

1904. Robert W. Thompson, Lewis- 

burg, Pa. 

1905. Earl A, Morton, Esq. 

1907. Prof. Leo. L, Rockwell, Lewis- 

burg, Pa. 

1908. ? 

1909. ? 

1910. Paul J. Abraham, Greensburg, 

Pa. 

1912. Prof. H. S. Everett, Lewisburg, 

Pa. 

1913. ? 

1914. ? 

1915. Prof. John B. Rishel. 

1917. ■'■■C. C. Gillette. 

1918. *Barton H. Mackey 

1919. *W. L. Gerhart, Lewisburg, Pa. 

1920. *H. L. Nancarrow. 

*Senior President. According to Buck- 
nell tradition, the senior president acts 
as secretary until another is appointed. 
® 

Vera C. Rockwell, '11, has an article 
in the January issue of "Mother and 
Child", entitled "Give The Young 
Mother A Chance". 



Discuss Forming 

Panhellenic Society 

Most of the BuckneU women at Wil- 
liamsport are members of the Woman's 
College club. During the past winter 
the members of the club discussed form- 
ing a Pan-Hellenic society, to meet for 
social purposes only. The plan has not 
been put into practice yet, but will 
probably be taken up more definitely 
in the fall. Marie Volkmar, '17, has 
served most efficiently as Correspond- 
ing Secretary of the club during the 
past year. 

® 

TO WELCOME DIS- 
TINGUISHED SCIENTIST 



Madame Marie Curie, most distin- 
guished of university women, most dis- 
tinguished of women scientists, due 
from Paris May 17, will be welcomed 
by the University Women of the United 
States, May 18, at four-thirty P. M. at 
Carnegie Hall. 

The meeting is being organized by 
the Association of University Women, 
the American branch of the Interna- 
tional Federation of University Women. 
You, a college woman, are invited to at- 
tend. 

More than anything else in the world 
Madame Curie wants one gram of ra- 
dium for experimental purposes. Sci- 
entists hope that, working with a single 
gram, she may be able to eliminate can- 
cer. Let us give her that single gram. 

One gram of radium costs $100,000. 

In the United States there are 100,000 
college women. Send your contribution 
to the Marie Curie Radium Fund. 



-^ 



Junge Bunnell, '00, Visits State 

Judge Charles E. Bunnell, of the 
class of 1900, for twenty years a resi- 
dent of Alaska and President Judge of 
the Fourth District United States 
Court of Alaska, has been visiting the 
States. 

While on a brief stay in Jacksonville, 
Florida, he granted to the representa- 
tive of the "Florida Metropolis" an in- 
terview, in the course of which he pre- 
dicted a tremendous boom in Alaska as 
the result of opening the Seward-Fair- 
banks Railroad. 

Judge Bunnell left Jacksonville to 
tour the Southern States, with stops in 
Louisiana and Texas, before taking ship 
in San Francisco for his return to 
Alaska. 

-® 

Additions to Music School Faculty 



A new addition to the School of 
Music faculty is Professor Robert Sea- 
man, voice teacher. Professor Seaman 
studied four years with William Dun- 
ham, three with Signor Oreste Bimboni, 
and was a scholarship pupil of the New 
England Conservatory. He has sung 
leading baritone roles for the conserva- 
tory operatic performances at the Bos- 
ton Theatre. He later toured with Otto 
Fischer and with Emil Koeppel. He 
has had teaching experience in the Neil 
School of Music and the Wichita Col- 
lege of Music, Wichita, Kansas. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 




BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 




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BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 




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BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 







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BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



11 



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If there's a hole in a' your coats, 
I rede ye tent it; 

A chiel's amang ye takin' notes. 
And faith he'll prent it. 

— Burns. 
1867 

Nettie Dunham-Creary, Institute, 
and her husband, who spent the winter 
at Atlantic City recently returned to 
their home in Warren, Pa. 
1869 

Miss Amanda Derr, Institute, died at 
the home of her nephew, Mr. C. F. 
Deitrich, April 2, 1921. Miss Derr 
taught in the public schools for many 
years. About four years ago she suf- 
fered a stroke of apoplexy and since 
that time she has been an invalid. 
1870 

Mrs. Annie R. MacDonald-Eckles, of 
Millerstown, was in Lewisburg for a 
week on account of the death of her 
sister, Miss Katherine MacDonald. 
Miss MacDonald was also a student of 
the Institute, but was prevented by ill- 
ness from graduating. .She has always 
taken the keenest interest in the wel- 
fare of the students. She was especial- 
ly interested in the activities of the 
Music department. Miss MacDonald 
died in the Geisinger Hospital, April S. 
1872 

Anna Wilson-Lodge, Institute, who 
was with the McCall Mission in Paris 
during the war, is still there. She re- 
cently made a journey into Northern 
Africa, also a sight-seeing trip into un- 
occupied Germany. 

1875 

To Sallie Aurand-Ritter, Institute, 

whose husband, Mr. Wm. P. Ritter, 

died January 16, 1921, goes forth the 

'deepest sympathy from her classmates 

and friends. . 

1878 

Margaret Focht-McClure, Institute, 
was appointed by Governor Sproul to 
serve as a member of the Board of 
Control of the Pennsylvania Village for 
Feeble Minded Women at Laurelton. 
Mrs. McClure has become a very valu- 
able member of the Board. 

1881 

Laura Bower-Hunsicker, Institute, 
died suddenly April IS, shortly after her 
arrival in Lewisburg, where she and her 
husband had planned to make their 
future home. 

1884 

Carrie Purdy, Institute, is now Prin- 
cipal of the Sara L. Keen School for 
Girls in Mexico City. 

1885 

Annie VanGundy, Institute, who 
spent the winter in Port Arthur, Texas, 
with her brother, Morris, has been ap- 
pointed a secretary in the executive of- 
fice of the Woman's Missionary Society 
of the United Lutheran Church, 803 
Fulton Building, Pittsburgh. 

Chella Scott-Beale has moved to 
Chicago so that she may be near two 
daughters who are employed there. The 



oldest daughter recently sailed for 
China, where she will begin work as a 
missionary. Mrs. Beale resides at 4432 
N. Lincoln street. 

1887 

Rebecca Schreyer- Miles is taking an 
extended trip in our own country. She 
traveled leisurely in the south, then 
went west and settled down for the 
winter in Santa Barbara, Cal. 
1891 

Rev. John MacCalman, husband of 
Margaret Evans- MacCalman, died at 
Lakemont, N. Y., January 27, 1921. 
Donald, the older son, is still in the ser- 
vice, located at Norfolk, Va., in the 
aviation department. The younger son 
is a senior in college. 

Maud Bowen, Music, is one of the 
managers of the Bowen School, Tren- 
ton, N. J. The three Bowen sisters 
have a fine old home in Trenton. The 
two big elms in front of the house were 
planted as mere slips to mark the road 
taken by George Washington when he 
made his famous visit to Trenton. The 
Bowen home is noted for its hospitality 
to Bucknell people. 

Caroline Wittenmyer-Greene, Institute, 
lives in Huntingdon, Pa. She has been 
President of the Civic Club there for a 
number of years, regent of the D. A. R., 
representative of the 30th senatorial dis- 
trict for the Woman's Republican 
Committee of Pennsylvania, chairman 
of the Woman's Republician Party of 
Huntingdon County. 

Mrs. Blanche A. Schreiner-Donald- 
son, of Williamsport, was married on 
January 12 in New York City to Mr. 
Watson L. Barclay. After a honey- 
moon spent in Florida they are now 
at home to their friends in Williams- 
port. Mrs. Barclay has been the guest 
of honor at several teas, luncheons and 
dinners in Williamsport where she is 
very prominent socially. 
1893 

Katherine P. Baker, 'Institute, 
(Goucher College, about 1898) who died 
of tuberculosis a year ago after work as 
a nurse in France, was among the fore- 
most Bucknell women. Most of her 
short stories appeared in Scribners and 
the Atlantic Monthly. 
1895 

Mary Wilson-Simpson, Institute, who 
with her mother, Mrs. Mary E. Wilson, 
her son, Geddes, and her daughter, 
Helen, spent the winter in Petersburg, 
Fla., returned to Lewisburg April 1. 

1896 
■ Dr. Mary Wolfe reports that she has 
one hundred girls at the Pennsylvania 
^'illage for Feeble Minded Women at 
Laurelton. She is hoping that the 
Pennsylvania Legislature, now in ses- 
sion, may give the Village a generous 
appropriation so that the further de- 
velopment of the institution may go on 
without delay. It may interest stu- 
dents of Psychology to know that very 
thorough studies in psychological re- 
search are being made at the Village 
now. 



1897 

Maud Hanna-Pitt and family are 
about to move from Berkley, Cal., to 
Norwich, Conn. Mr. Pitt went to Berk- 
ley as pastor of the First Church eight 
years ago. During his pastorate the 
church membership has doubled and a 
new .$85,000 church plant has been 
erected free from debt. Dr. Pitt has 
accepted the pastorate of the Central 
Baptist Church of Norwich, a town of 
about 30,000 inhabitants, considered one 
of the most beautiful New England 
towns. The Central Church has a 
membership of more than ,800. 
1898 

Since the death of her husband nearly 
two years ago, Mary Dunleavy-Tier, 
Institute, has continued to live in Mt. 
Carmel with her little son. She taught 
in the public schools this year. 

Amy Gilbert-Allison, Music, came up 
from Elysburg to attend the reinstalla- 
tion exercises of the Eta chapter of 
A'pha Chi Omega on April 1st. 

Ann Gilchrist Strong, ex-'98, is in 
New Zealand, where she accepted, last 
fall, a professorship in the Llniversity 
of Otago, at Dunedin, N. Z. 
1899 

Clara Wilson-Brown, Institute, died 
March 14, 1921. She leaves a husband, 
Mr. William Brown, of Rochester, Pa., 
and three children. 

Eloise Schuyler, ex-'99, teaches history 
in the West Philadelphia High School 
for Girls. 

Grace A. DeWitte, ex-Institute, was 
elected a delegate to the National Bien- 
nial at Des Moines last June to repre- 
sent the State Federation of Women's 
Clubs of Pennsylvania. It was a great 
disappointment to both her and the 
Williamsport Club that . she was pre- 
vented by illness from attending. 

Mary Emily McCreight, Institute, 
'99, is head nurse at the Arnot-Ogden 
Hospital at Elmira, N. Y. 
1900 

Gertrude Willburn Roos was mar- 
ried to Frank Beecher Emery, of Wil- 
liamsport, in New York City on March 
24. After a short honeymoon in Atlan- 
tic City they will reside in Williams- 
port, being at home to friends after 
May 1, at 914 High street. Gertrude 
was overseas during the war and has 
since been employed in New York City. 

Anna Judd has been giving instruction 
during the winter in First Aid to Troop 
1 of the Girl Scouts of Lewisburg. 

Genevieve White-Shorkley and her 
husband. Dr. Thornton M. Shorkley, 
are both practicing medicine at Tidi- 
oute, Pa. 

1901 

Jennie Davis-Phillips is getting her 
household goods arranged in her hand- 
some Colonial home on Taylor street. 
1902 

Florence Rothermel, ex-'02, teaches 
mathematics in the West Philadelphia 
High School for Girls. 

Mary Unger-McCracken is enjoying 



12 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



life on the small farm which she and 
her husband, John W. McCracken, re- 
cently bought. The farm is on the trol- 
ley line which runs out from Rochester, 
N. Y., so that Mr. McCracken goes in 
to his law office each morning, and the 
daughter goes in to school. 

Jeanette B. Shepard is a cataloguer 
in Crozer Theological Seminary Li- 
lirary at Chester, Pa. 
1903 
Emily Ebling is teaching English in 
the West Philadelphia High School for 
girls. Miss Ebling is Secretary of the 
Bucknell Alumnae Club, of Philadel- 
phia. Her address is 5000 Knox street, 
Germantowfl. 

Ida Luchsinger is always ready to do 
a good turn for Bucknell. She is still 
in Wilkes-Barre High School perparing 
students for the old college. 

Bessie' Burchett, ex-03, received her 
A.B. from Temple College, and her 
Ph.D. from the University of Pennsyl- 
vania. She is now head of the Language 
Department of the South Philadel- 
phia High School for Girls. She is the 
author of a Latin book for first year 
students. 

1904 
"April Weather", a volume of poems 
by Blanche Bane-Kuder, has been an- 
nounced by Cornhill and Company, 
Publishers, Boston. 

Alif Stephens writes from Norwich, 
Conn., where she is visiting her aunt, 
that she went to a concert and heard 
eight of her songs sung by a little girl. 
"The audience seemed to like them". 

Olive Schillinger and her sister have 
built themselves a house in Munhall 
where they are teaching. They are en- 
joying the comforts of a home in con- 
nection with their school duties. 
,1905 
Pearl Smith-Burpee has gotten her 
family nicely settled in their beautiful 
new house on South Second street, op- 
posite the Court House. 

Ruth Shorkley-Bliss and her family 
are nicely settled in Fresno, Fresno 
County, Cal., where Mr. Bliss is en- 
gaged in the fruit business. 

Margaret Forgeus is librarian in 
Meredith College, Raleigh, N. C. 

Bess Harpel, ex-'05, is Mrs. F. T. 
Burke. She lives at 126,5 Culver Road, 
Rochester, N. Y. She has two daugh- 
ters. Her husband is treasurer of the 
Graham Company Nurseries. 
1906 • 
Mrs. Don R. Freary, formerly Ruth 
Royal, who attended the Institute, is an 
accomplished pianist, and has given a 
number of recitals in Montclair, N. J. 
Carrie McCaskie-Wise lives in Ash- 
bourne, Pa. A son, William, aged 9, 
keeps her time occupied with interest- 
ing experiences. 

Helen Rickabaugh is now teaching in 
McKeesport, Pa., High School. 

Hazel Knapp-Cole is the enthusiastic 
help-mate of Dr. Cole, who is a rising 
specialist in Cleveland, Ohio. 

Ruth Hammitt-Kauffman (Mrs. Reg- 
inald Wright Kauffman), Columbia, Pa,, 
did some fine war writing, including 
verse, as a member of the Vigilantes. 

Mary M. Moll, of Reading, was a re- 
cent visitor in Lewisburg. 
1907 
Bess Taylor, Institute, ex-'07, is with 
her parents in Williamsport, where she 
leads a very useful life. 



Mertie Alexander-Stilgen lives in 
Seattle, where her husband is in the 
Northwest Investment Company. 

Mary Stanton-Speicher has settled 
down in Reading, 1050 Madison avenue. 
After going through the unsettled years 
of the war the Speichers bought a 
house and moved what household ef- 
fects had escaped the fire and the nu- 
merous movings into it where they are 
living very comfortably while Mr. 
Speicher practices law in the city of 
Reading. There is a son. Jack. 
1908 
Katherine MacLaggan is not dead as 
was reported, but very much alive, — 
she needs to be. She is an Assistant 
Instructor of the Romance Languages 
at DePauw University, Greencastle, In- 
diana. Jennie MacLaggan-Black lives 
at Matoon, 111. 

Grace Royer was married on March 
22, 1921, to Mr. Robert Maclay, of Bell- 
ville, Pa. They will live at Bellville, 
and Mr. Royer, Grace's father, has con- 
sented to go to Bellville. 

Olive Richards is with the national 
board of the Y. W. C. A. She is Pub- 
licity Director of the Service Campaign 
Bureau, Financial Department. Her 
work brings her frequent changes of 
scene and varied experiences. She spent 
January in Charlotte, N. C, February 
and part of March in Lowell, Mass., the 
latter part of March in Trenton, N. J., 
and is now booked for Charlotte again. 
Olive and her sister, Beatrice, spent the 
Easter week-end with Emily Ebling, '03, 
at her home in Germantown. Olive 
may be reached at her New York busi- 
ness address, 600 Lexington avenue. 

Jean Hopwood is teaching at Kawaia- 
hao Seminary, Honolulu, a branch of 
the Mill's School, of which her brother 
is Principal. She has already booked 
her passage for return to the States for 
June 14. Although she has tempting 
offers for next year she prefers to get 
nearer home. 

Beatrice R. Richards is still teaching 
in the technical high school at Scranton. 
She spent several months of the past 
year in Honolulu. 

Elsie Owens is a nurse at the Arnot- 
Ogden Hospital, EHmra, N. Y. 

1909 

Edna Meacham is engaged in gradu- 
ate work at Cornell University. Her 
address is 422 Eddy street, Ithaca, N. Y. 

Hazel Craig-Jackson is now living in 
Danville, where her husband is Super- 
intendent of the State Hospital for the 
Insane. 

Lillian Turner has been making a 
special study of methods of teaching 
Latin. She is the author of a book for 
beginners. 

Eunice Hall is the the assistant of the 
County Superintendent of Public In- 
struction in Lackawanna County, with 
offices in Scranton. 

Mrs. David Finley (Gertrude A. 
Myers) is now in Coblenz, with her 
husband, Lieut. Finley, who is still in 
the U. S, military service. 

Margaret Dougal, who did special 
work in both "Sem" and college, and 
later studied in both France and Ger- 
many, is now teacher of French in the 
High School at Bridgeport, Conn. She 
reports occasional glimpses of Julia 
Brown. 



1910 

Claire S. Shellhamer is practicing 
medicine at 285 Webb avenue, corner 
Hamilton Blvd., Detroit, Mich. 

Emily Lane is manager of the Pitts- 
burgh office of the National Teachers' 
Agency. 

Jane Chapman has changed her 
work and is now secretary to the Su- 
perintendent of Allegheny County 
Schools. 

Eva Weddle is at 601 East 10th street, 
Tucson, Arizona, with her brother, 
Henry, who has not been well since he 
came from France. They are house- 
keeping in a furnished cottage and lik- 
ing it immensely. 

Georgia Weddle-Balliet, with her lit- 
tle daughter, Frances, is now at home 
with her parents. West Newton, Pa. 
Her husband is traveling for the Joy 
Machine Co., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Miss Charlotte C. Lloyd, ex-'lO, of 
the Spanish department of the Wilkes- 
Barre High School takes work each 
summer at Ann Arbor: She was just 
sent word by the Jewish women's coun- 
cil, of New York City, that a pupil of 
hers was given the position of interpre- 
ter for the Spanish Naval Commission 
now in this country. The position was 
filled by an oral examination. 

Ida K. Wiiliams-Rea has for some 
time been a contributor to children's 
and young people's magazines, where 
her stories are always we'.comed. Just 
at present she has been writing a series 
of immigrant life that are appearing 
from time to time in the Youths' Com- 
panion. 

1911 
Katherine Carpenter is teaching Eng- 
lish at the South Philadelphia High 
School for Girls. She was formerly at 
William Penn. Katherine lives at her 
home and commutes. 

Ruth Safford is teaching in the High 
School at East Orange, N. J. 

Edith Harpel-Poorman lives in Dan- 
vil'.e, 111., where her husband is in busi- 
ness. 

1912 

Olive Long-Haggerty finds life in 
southern California very interesting. 
She is living in Los Angeles. 

Sue Weddell has charge of the work 
for "teen age" girls in Chicago under 
the Y. W. C. A. Last summer she open- 
ed a girls' camp near Chicago where al- 
most 1000 girls from the high schools 
spent their vacations. She can be ad- 
dressed at 515 Garland Building, 5S 
E. Washington street, Chicago, 111. 
1913 

Helen Bartol is booked for a trip 
through Europe this summer with the 
party conducted by Prof. Griffith. 

Hazel Galloway-Hemphill now lives 
in the new bungalow built on the spot 
where her husband used to hunt, so the 
location is fresh and roomy. The ad- 
dress is 1916 11th avenue. North, Seattle, 
Wash. Hazel is a member of the LTni- 
versity Club and a sub-captain on the 
membership drive. When a thousand 
meml^ers are secured a $150,000 club 
house will be built. 

1914 

Helen Waite, '14, who is now Mrs. 
Roliert F. Lawrence, is living at De- 
troit, Mich. 

1915 

Margaret C. Weddell may be address- 
ed until June at Broddus College, Phil- 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



13 



ippi, W. Va. She reports almost enough 
Bucknellians at Broddus to have a real 
Bucknell club — Karl Hulley, Stanley 
Harris, Ruth Embrey Harris, Dr. El- 
kanah Hulley and Mr. Walter B. Pimm. 
1916 

Amy Patterson-Stevenson's address is 
565 W. 175th street. New York City. 
Her husband, Dr. Stevenson, is at the 
Psychiatric Institute, Ward's Island, 
New York, N. Y. 

Theresa McCollum is teaching Latin 
in the High School at Vandergrift, Pa. 

Cecile McCollum is giving private 
lessons in piano to pupils near Mon- 
trose. 

Mrs. Staunton Greenwald (Marian 
Vosburg, ex-'16) and her young son, as 
well as her sister, Evelyn Vosburg, '16, 
are living at their home in Watertown, 
N. Y. Mrs. Greenwald's husband has 
been dead for several years. 

Anne Waite (Mrs. P. E. Daugherty) 
is now living in Williamsport, where her 
husband has recently accepted a new 
and interesting position as Manager of 
the National Seed Association, a com- 
pany, engaged in growing and distribut- 
ing seeds free from germs. Her address 
is the Maples, 850 Louisa street. 

1917 

Born, to Albert El'iiot and Margaret 
Collins-Elliot, a daughter, Nancy Jane, 
the second child. The Elliots are at 
the old address at Baltimore, 2117 Guil- 
ford avenue. 

On Easter Sunday Mr. and Mrs. F. 
B. Clayton, of 229 Northland avenue, 
Buffalo, N. Y., announced the engage- 
ment of their daughter, Katherine, In- 
stitute, '14, University, '17, to Mr. 
Samuel Lyon Russell, of Bedford, Pa. 
1918 

Louise Bassell (Mrs. E. J. Belcher) 
lives at 1722 73rd street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Zelda Hawes is engaged as a dietitian 
at the Walter Reed Reconstruction Hos- 
pital at Washington, D. C. Hazel Gay 
and Elizabeth Champion, of this class, 
spent the Easter vacation with her in 
Washington. 

Mary Dewees is at the State Home 
for Women, Jacksonville, Ark. The 
farm is located in the foot hill of the 
Ozarks, about 26 miles from Little 
Rock. The present capacity is about 
fifty, but each department is being de- 
veloped with a view of accommodating 
several hundred. 

Mary Speece, who is teaching in the 
High School at Pittston, Pa., is back at 
her work after an absence of some time 
on account of illness. 

Dorothy Kanter, who is assistant to 
Charlotte C. Lloyd, ex-'lO, in her 
modern 'anguage work in the Wilkes- 
Barre High School, is now on leave of 
absence due to ill health. 

Martha Wettlaufer, who is Assistant 
Principal of the South Williamsport 
High School, spent the summer at Mid- 
dlebury College, Middlebury, Vt., in the 
study of French. She recently put her 
knowledge of the French language to 
practical use by drilling and presenting 
a French playlet, "La Surprise d'Isidore", 
which was pronounced a real success, 
more so as most of those taking part 
were only first year pupils of the school. 

Dagmar James has left New York 
City, and with her brother, has gone to 
California. Her address is 861 Sutter 
street, San Francisco, Cal. 



1919 

Marguerite I. Quigley, who is head of 
the ancient and modern language de- 
partments in the Williamsport High 
School, recently wrote a paper on Indian 
folk lore, which was read before the 
Woman's College Club. She has been 
elected Corresponding Secretary for the 
same organization for 1921-22. 

Miss Edith Schillinger, who is now 
teaching in the State Home for Girls, 
Trenton, N. J., writes with great en- 
thusiasm of her work there. Miss Schil- 
linger has charge of physical training 
and recreation work. 

The Bucknell women of the Pitts- 
burgh section have organized an Alum- 
nae Association of about twenty mem- 
bers. Louisa Seiler-Dumont, Institute, 
'00, is President; Bina Carr, ex-'Ol, In- 
stitute, is Secretary; Mabel Browning- 
Pogue, Music, '01, is Treasurer. 

Mrs. Florence Penny MacDonald, 
who for several years was matron of the 
Institute, died at the home of her son 
in Washington, D. C, January 2, 1921. 
The girls of the 90's will remember Mrs. 
MacDonald as a woman of unusal re- 
finement and dignity. 

Born, to Prof, and Mrs. C. C. Fries, 
(Agnes Carswell, '19), at Ann Arbor, 
Mich , a daughter, who has been named 
Agnes Caroline. 

Easter and the week preceding 
brought a host of Bucknell girls back 
to Lewisburg — Pearl Ream-Wil'iaras 
came down from Nanticoke to visit her 
family. Laura McGann came from Al- 
toona, where she is teaching, to visit 
her mother. Mar-y Leiser-Bostwick and 
Sarah Judd-Shields came from Wilkins- 
burg to visit their parents. 

Mary Young, of Palmyra, N. J., High 
School, visited her sister. 

Mabel Batten-Dutton, of Buffalo, 
N. Y., visited Mrs. Llewellyn Phillips. 

Edith Kelly-Featherston, of New 
York, visited her Lewisburg friends. 

Eleanor Lawshe came up from Read- 
ing to spend a few days with her many 
friends. 

Florence and Frances Barber spent 
their Easter vacation in Lewisburg with 
their father. Dr. W. F. Barber. 

Miss Mabel Jones, of Jermyn, is now 
Mrs. L. A. Winters. 

■■ ® 

Home Economics 

(Continued from Page Four) 

Senior years of the general Science 
course and the women completing the 
four year course received the degree of 
B.S. In 1919 the original two-year 
course was dropped entirely and a new 
four year course leading to the degree 
of B.S. in Home Economics was adopt- 
ed. This course follows close'y the A.B. 
course for the first two years while the 
last two years are devoted to the 
special field of Home Economics. 

The Home Economics Laboratory is 
located on the third floor of the Main 
Building at the Women's College. It is 
planned to accommodate twenty-four 
students and is well equipped. Con- 
nected with the Laboratory is a din- 
ing room. It is the desire of the Home 
Economics department to have a model 
house so that each student may have 
practical experience in the routine of 
housekeeping. 

Alumni who come back to visit their 
old haunts will find in the big, light airy 
room on second floor of Annex, once 



used in connection with the Art de- 
partment, a sewing room, well equip- 
ped with machines, tables, and all that 
is necessary to this work. 




Miss Florence Fowler 

Instructor in Sewing 
When the Home Economics course 
was first introduced into the college 
courses, clothing held a minor place 
and was offered only to students in the 
course. It has developed and grown 
until now many of the women from the 




Miss Olive Douglass 

Instructor in Dietetics 
other courses are electing it. The aim 
of the course in sewing is to teach con- 
struction, to give a knowledge of ma- 
terials and values and to help establish 
a much-needed standard for good ma- 
terials. 



14 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



Representative Alumnae 



(We are grateful to Mrs. Lewis Ed- 
win Theiss for the following sketches, 
selected as alumnae representative of 
Bucknell women who are accomplish- 
ing much in the world today. — Ed.) 

Dr. Mary Moore Wolfe is a Bucknell 
graduate whose family has been closely 
associated with the university from its 
beginning. Her great uncle, Dr. Wm. 
H. Ludwig, was the first chairman of 
the board of trustees; her maternal 
grandfathers James Moore, Sr., and 
Joseph Meixell, her great uncle, James 
Moore, Jr., and her paternal grand- 
father, Samuel Wolfe, all were mem- 
bers of the original board of trustees. 
Her father, the Honorable Chas. S. 
Wo!fe, '66, was a valued member of the 
board in his lifetime. 

Dr. Wolfe, '95, was graduated from 
Bucknell summa cum laude and was a 
Commencement speaker. After study- 
ing for three years in the department 
of medicine and surgery at Ann Arbor 
she received her M.D. from the Univer- 
sity of Michigan in 1899, and that fall 
became assistant physician in the 
woman's department of the Pennsyl- 
vania Hospital at Norristown. In 1901 
she was promoted to be chief physician 
of the woman's department of the same 
hospital, serving most acceptably until 
her resignation in 1909. She then open- 
ed a private san'tarium for nervous dis- 
eases at Stonyhurst, Holmesburg. In 
connection with this private practice 



she served as a lecturer at the Woman's 
Medical College in Philadelphia. 

When Dr. Wolfe left this work she 
was appointed by Governor Tener, in 
1914, a member of the first board of 
managers of the proposed Pennsylvania 
Village for Feeble Minded Women. She 
served as the secretary of this board 
until her election, in 1919, as Superinten- 
dent of the Village. Much of the wise 
expenditure of state funds in the de- 
velopment of this Village is due to Dr. 
Wolfe's careful and skilful handling. 
For six months during the war she was 
absent on leave, serving as physician- in 
the Woman's Hospital at Muscle 
Shoa's, Ala., where she had charge of 
the physical examination of all women 
employees connected with this govern- 
mental undertaking. 

The Pennsylvania Village for Feeble 
Minded Women was formally opened 
at Laure!ton in 1919 with Dr. Wolfe as 
its Superintendent and organizer. Three 
cottages, to house approximately 150 
patients, have already been built and 
equipped. These are now filled. On 
the 634 acres belonging to the Village, 
three more cottages, it is hoped, will 
soon be erected and made ready for ad- 
ditional patients, as the institution has 
already reached the limit of its capacity 
and cannot now accommodate its pres- 
ent waiting list. 

Psychological tests and studies of the 
patients, begun last summer, show that 
25 per cent, of the Village's patient 
population is composed of morons, 55 
per cent, imbeciles, and 20 per cent. 



idiots. It has been possible, with super- 
vision, to have the patients perform 
helpful tasks about the Village. In the 
cottages they have helped with the 
housework and in making necessary 
clothing. Outside the cottages they 
have helped to improve the appearance 
of the grounds by brushing out and 
c'eaning up the woods near the cottages 
as a protection against forest fires. This 
work, done originally about five years 
ago when the first cottage was erected, 
cost nearly S400. At present the girls 
are brushing out the basin of an aban- 
doned dam that is being repaired for 
use as an ice pond. In the truck 
patches, too, they have made a fine 
record. As a large share of play is also 
essential to their well-being, many sorts 
of recreation have been planned for 
them outdoors, and indoors, books, 
magazines and victrolas please them. 

No small part of the valuable service 
Dr. Wolfe has already given to the Vil- 
lage is due to the inspiration of helpful 
gifts from Mrs. John H. Weaver (Ida 
Davidson, Inst., '82), of Williamsport, 
and the efficient interest of Mrs. Harold 
M. McClure (Margaret Focht, Inst., 
'7SI, of Lewisburg, a member of the 
Board of managers. 

Dr. Mary Bartol Theiss, '94, is an- 
other daughter of Bucknell, where her 
father. Dr. Wm. C. Bartol, '72, is as 
well known for his unusual ability as 
a teacher of mathematics as for his old- 
time skill in baseball. Mary Bartol was 
graduated summa cum laude and was 
a Commencement speaker. For two 



CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE ENDOWMENT AND EQUIPMENT FUNDS 



(Continued) 



Amount previously reported §11 

.Anne W. Galbraith, Williamsport 

Mrs. Frank C. Marshall, Phoenixville, Pa 

Anna G. Moyer, Philadelphia, Pa 

Schreyer's Store, Milton, Pa 

l.aMont R. Rentz, North Orange, N. J 

Weaver W. Pangburn, Jersey City, N. J 

Charles M. Teufel, Middletown, Md 

Marian E. Shivers, Trenton, N. J 

Trotter Brothers, Philadelphia, Pa 

T. J. PhiUips, Atglen, Pa 

Mrs. Harry S. Hopper, Philadelphia, Pa 5 

Carl A. Metz, Scranton, Pa 

Dr. Charles H. Dimm, Mifflinburg, Pa 

F. Z. Trax, Meadville, Pa 

Dr. George T. Ritter, Williamsport, Pa 

W. N. Hunter, WiUiamsport, Pa 

Edith H. Evans, Millville, N.J 

Margaret I. Sible, Mountaindale, Pa 

Marguerite T. Lotte, Paterson, N. J 

Frank Domzalski, Nanticoke, Pa 

William H. Clipman, Mifflinburg, Pa 

Alfred Hayes, New York, N. Y 

Dr. Charles Elsen, Kane, Pa 

C. F. Eisenminger, Williamsport, Pa 

John H. Macalpine, Pittsburgh, Pa 

Mrs. John H. Macalpine, Pittsburgh, Pa 

Edwin P. Griffith, Pittsburgh, Pa 

Harlan A. Trax, Brooklyn, N. Y 

Mrs. M. R. Loomis, Lykens, Pa 

Nora M. Green, Lewistown, Pa 

Stephen G. Duncan, Philadelphia, Pa 

Jeannette E. Shepard, Chester, Pa 

J. S. Thomas, Peckville, Pa 

Gladys Emrick, Shamokin, Pa 

W. W. Kelchner, New York, N. Y 

Elizabeth Couffer, Harrisburg, Pa 

S. M. Bryant, Wilmington, Dela 

Helen S. Horton, Donora, Pa 

Ralph J. Hess, St. Louis, Mo 

Florence V. Stauffer, Newark, N. J 



,846.13 

10.00 

5.00 

7.00 

100.00 

25.00 

5.00 

5.00 

50.00 

50.00 

50.00 

,000.00 

2.00 

25.00 

170.00 

100.00 

20.00 

10.00 

2.00 

25.00 

25.00 

10.00 

5.00 

20.00 

25.00 

250.00 

100.00 

50.00 

100 00 

5.00 

31.25 

40.00 

10.00 

10.00 

25 00 

500.00 

5.00 

20.00 

10.00 

15.00 

10.00 



Emanuel Warmkessel, Kingston, Pa 

J. O. Shipman, Brooklyn, N. Y 

H. G. Florin, Pittsburgh, Pa 

M. Eloise Schuyler, Philadelphia, Pa 

S. Homer Smith, Philadelphia, Pa 

Henry L. Fonda, Milton, Pa 

Frank Anderson, Auburn, N. Y 

G. Grant Painter, Muncy, Pa 

Dr. Thomas A. Gill, Philadelphia, Pa 

J. W. Grier, Pittsburgh, Pa 

Elizabeth F. Ewens, Dormont, Pa 

Catherine Engelbert, Philadelphia, Pa 

Hazel Florin, Dormont, Pa 

Minnie G. Eckels, Camden, N. J 

John A. Morris, Soldier's Home, California. 

Ruby G. Pierson, Milwaukee, Wis 

H. C. Thompson, Beaver Falls, Pa 

Mrs. W. F. Davies, Scranton, Pa 

F. Theo. Brown, Philadelphia, Pa 

J. Henry Shoemaker, Trenton, N.J 

Ralph B. Beard, Portage, Pa 

B. E. Butt, Harrisburg, Pa 

Joseph W. Henderson, Philadelphia, Pa. . . 

Emma E. Dillon, Trenton, N. J 

Frank W. Stanton, Cleveland, Ohio 

J. Newton Glover, Vicksburg, Pa 

L. Antoinette Crary, Warren, Pa 

W. F. Kunkle, Williamsport, Pa 



10.00 

25.00 

20.00 
500 

10.00 

500.00 

5.00 

25.00 
400.00 

50.00 
5.00 

20.00 
5.00 
5.00 

10.00 
5.00 
5.00 
2.00 

20.00 

10.00 
5.00 
5.00 

60.00 

50.00 
100 00 
100.00 
500.00 

12 50 



Total to December 1, 1920 $20,742.88 

We feel sure that many of the alumni who have not 
yet subscribed to the new endowment and equipment funds 
fully intend to have a share in helping Bucknell grow. Just 
now there is a fine opportunity to carry out your good in- 
tentions. The addition to the Chemical Laboratory, now 
building, will cost about thirty thousand dollars. No study 
in the curriculum has a more vital bearing upon life than 
Chemistry. Have a share in the new building. Send your 
subscription and check to the Treasurer, Dr. John T. Judd, 
Lewisburg, Pa. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



15 



years she was a graduate student in 
Greek and Romance languages at the 
University of Michigan, which at the 
suggestion of her major professor, in 
1897, gave her the degree of A.B. in 
order that she might retain real con- 
nection with the university. For that 
year her major professor. Dean M. L. 
D'Ooge, had sent to the University of 
Pennsylvania a letter of recommenda- 
tion which resulted in her appointment 
to the Bennett Fellowship in Classics 
at the University of Pennsylvania. This 
fellowship she held fsr two years. She 
refused to accept a graduate scholarship 
offered by Bryn Mawr College and 
continued her studies at the University 
of Pennsylvania, where she received the 
degree of Ph.D., in 1899. 

For two years of this time she served 
as corresponding secretary of the Fed- 
eration of Graduate Clubs. As a repre- 
sentative of Michigan, she was elected 
to this office at a meeting of the Federa- 
tion which included among its delegates 
W. A. Neilson, now president of Smith; 
J. H. McCraeken, now president of 
Lafayette ; Miss Pendleton, now presi- 
dent of Wellesley, and the late F. A. 
Sykes, who became president of the 
Connecticut Woman's College. 

In the fall of 1899 Dr. Bartol went to 
Rockford College, Rockford, 111., where 
for four years she was head professor 
of Greek and Latin. This position she 
resigned in 1903 and was married that 
summer to Mr. Lewis Edwin Theiss, of 
New York City, who for ten years was 
a member of the editorial staff of the 
New York Sun. 

She is a member of both the Bucknell 
and the Michigan chapters of Pi Beta 
Phi and has been actively interested in 
the development of the fraternity. She 
served as member of the Literary 
Bureau of Alpha Province in charge of 
chapter examinations, and as President 
of Alpha Province. She was chairman 
of the Song Book Committee and was 
the compiler of Songs of Pi Beta Phi. 
The first edition of this song book was 
published in the spring of 1899, when 
Miss Bartol was taking her final ex- 
aminations for the degree of Ph.D. 
Mrs. Theiss edited a second edition of 
the fraternity song book in 1906. From 
1901 to 1909 she served as fraternity 
cataloguer, publishing a catalogue of 
membership in 1906 From 1908 to 1912 
she was editor of the Pi Beta Phi Ar- 
row. During her editorship the maga- 
zine's circulation grew from two to 
four thousand copies. At Michigan 
she was elected to Phi Beta Kappa. 

Since her marriage she and her hus- 
band have collaborated in much of their 
magazine writing. For in 1913 Mr. 
Theiss resigned from the staff of the 
Sun in order to be free to devote all his 
time to magazine writing. Mr. and 
Mrs. Theiss began their literary part- 
nership with the publication, by the 
W. A. Wilde Company, of Boston, of 
His Big Brother, a story dealing with 
the Big Brother movement. In 1908 
Pictorial Review sent Mr. and Mrs. 
Theiss on a tour of investigation 
through the various suffrage states to 
study the effects of equal suffrage on 
the men and women of the states con- 
cerned. The resulting series of articles 
appeared in Pictoral Review the follow- 
ing year. Since then their magazine 
work has dealt largely with economic 
and inspirational subjects connected 



with the development of the home and 
family. They have been frequent con- 
tributors to the Century, Country Life, 
Garden Magazine, Good Housekeeping, 
Ladies' Home Journal, People's Home 
Journal, Pictorial Review, Youth's 
Companion, and other periodicals. 
® • 

DEATHS 



Christopher C. Hazen, '74 

Word has been received in Lewisburg 
of the death of Christopher C. Hazen, 
of the Class of 1874. He was in his 
seventieth year. 

Joseph Moore, 71 
Joseph A. Moore, an Honorary Master 
of Arts of 1871, died February 12, 1921. 
Elhanan Fisher, ex-'59 
Be'.ated notice has been received pf 



principal of the Sharon High School. 
A year later he was appointed super- 
visor of schools at Bethlehem and 
Watertown and principal of the Water- 
town High School. In 1915 he was ap- 
pointed principal of the Torrington 
High School on the high recommen- 
dation of Secretary Hine of the State 
Board of Education. This position he 
held until June, 1920, resigning at that 
time to enter the firm of Brooks and 
McNeil, Insurance. Just recently he 
had entered upon business for himself. 

He was a Knight Templar and an 
Elk, a charter member of the Rotary 
Club, director and president of the Y. 
M. C. A., member of the Boy Scout 
Council, and the Torrington Club. In 
college he was a member of Delta Theta 
Upsilon Fraternity. 

He was married in 1916 to Miss Sabra 
Scovi'-le, of Watertown, who survives 




College Girls' Athletic Association, 1896 
Henrietta Allen, Mary Evans Chambers, Anna May Gilchrist, Anna Kate 
Goddard, Mary Belle Harris, Ahce June Lillibridge, Nellie Taylor, Margaret Alice 
Thomas, Mary Moore Wolfe. 



the death, ten years since, of Elhanan 
Fisher, ex-'59. 

Annie Bell-Stubbs, Inst,, '58 
Word has just been received of the 
death on January 26, 1916, of Annie 
Bell-Stubbs, Inst., '58. 

Milton T. Slater, ex-'70 
Milton T. Slater, ex-'70, died eight 
years ago, according to information fur- 
nished by his son, Milton T. Slater, Jr. 
George Tomlinson, ex-'69 
George Tomlinson, ex-'69, died several 
years since at Bridgeton, N. J. 
Charles R. McLain, ex-'OO 
Word has been received of the death 
at an unknown date of Charles Mc- 
Lain, ex-'OO. 

John Wesley Halliwell, '10 
John Wesley Halliwell, '10, died 
March 23, at the Charlotte Hungerford 
Hospital, Torrington, Conn., of appen- 
dicitis. He had been operated on some 
days before, and failed to rally from the 
operation. 

Mr. Halliwell was one of the most 
prominent and popular young men in 
Torrington, where he had resided since 
1915. 

After graduation from Bucknell he 
had taught at Bloomsburg for a year, 
then went to Connecticut to become 



him, as do two children, John W., aged 
three, and William L., aged two. He 
is survived also by his parents, two 
brothers, and three sisters, among them 
Florence Halliwell Hardy, ex-'14. 

Funeral services were held at Water- 
town, where interment was made. The 
schools of Torrington and Watertown 
were closed during the burial service 
and despite bad weather the street was 
lined with school children anxious to 
show their respect and affection. 
William Harrison Mentzer, '72 

The Rev. William Harrison Mentzer, 
'72, died Monday, April 4, at his home, 
102 East Sixth street, Lansdale, Pa. 

Mr. Mentzer was born at Chambers- 
burg, Pa., in 1844. After his graduation 
from Bucknell, he established Baptist 
churches at Athens, Tunkhannock, 
and Hazleton, and was pastor at Potts- 
town, Troy, and Hazleton, and for the 
past five years at Royersford. He had 
been in the pastorate for forty-seven 
years. 

He is survived by his widow, three 
sisters and a brother, and by the follow- 
ing children: Edwin T. Mentzer, of San 
Francisco ; Mrs. Harold Robinson, of 
Norristown; Mrs. C. A. Vance, of 5601 
Willows avenue, Philadelphia, and Ruth 
Mentzer, of Lansdale. 



16 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



BDCKBiSLL 3 CBS 
Allf Sta liens '04 ^*^ Steph.ne-forter '06 

Pedloated Xo oar father, Laroy StaphtuB 



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A - bove Susquehanna' s fair va 

V/e loot to our dear Al - ma Ila 



ters.Tiiat mirror the heavens deep blue 
tcr por all that Is noble and true 



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The tow - ers of dear Al - ma lia - ter Stand statelj' and glorious to view, 

And af - ter we've fone from her Bhel- ter She'll guide n8 In all that Ve do. 



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Buck - nell 



Buck - nell The sound of the chorus we'll swell. 



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BUCKNELL ALUMNI DIRECTORY 



17 



For Real Service, Let B. U. Men Serve You 



During the past few years over five hundred (500) Bucknell Students have taken 
out Life Insurance policies -with the Equitable Life of Iowa. Successful men invari- 
ably are men w^ho, in early years, realized the value of life insurance. 

Life Insurance makes for Success 



Tyson, 11 



RICE y TYSON, Gen. Agts., 906 Kunkel Bldg., Harrishurg, Pa. 



Andrew A. Leiser Andrew A. Lciser. Jr. 

U. ai L.. '69 B. U.. '98. Yale. '99 

Law Offices of 
Andrew Albright Leiser 
Andrew Albright Leiser, Jr. 

Lewisburgh, Union County 
_ Pennsylvania 

H. B. WEAVER, '14 

Catalogs, Yearboolts, House 
Organs. 

THE PITTSBURGH PRINT- 
ING CO. 
530 Fernando St., 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 



G. F. RASSWEILER 

Professor of Public Speaking, 

BUCKNELL UNIV. 

Dramatic Reader, Lecturer, and 
Entertainer. 



Ralph L. Belford, '05 

Attorney-at-Law 
Milton, Pa. 



WM. R. FOLLMER 

ATTORNEY-AT-LAW 
Notary in Office 



Lewisburg 



Pennsylvania 



John F. Winkelhlech, '14 
Invest in a Farm! 

E. A. STROUT FARM AGENCY 
Knows the Good Ones, 
Advertises and Sells Them. 
Phone 113R8 Lewisburg, Pa. 



FOR LEGAL SERVICE IN PITTSBURGH 

'96— A. C. ROHLAND, 1203 Oliver Building. 

'00— H. B. WASSELL, 1404 Union Bank Building. 

'04— E. P. GRIFFITHS, 5^ Legal Dept., Philadelphia Co. 

'05— E. A. MORTON, 1204 Park Building. 

'05— R. G. BOSTWICK, 1101 Berger Building. 

'09— H. G. FLORIN, 1101 Berger Building. 



WHEN IN ATLANTIC CITY 


Harold-C. Edwards,' 1 5 


Remember 




The Chelsea Baptist Church 


~Attorney-at-Law 


is on Atlantic Ave., between 




Brighton and Morris 
THOS. J. CROSS, D.D., '91, Minister 


Stroudsburg, Penna. 


* PAUL G. SMITH,'05 

Attomey-at-Law 


Geo. P. Miller, '84 


HARRISBURG, PA. 




State Department practice, in- 
cluding Corporation Tax and 
Public Service Commission mat- 
ters. 


FIRE INSURANCE 

82 University Ave., Lewisburg, Pa. 



New and Used Motors Phone 

Heavy Construction Calvert 

Rewinding 3573 

The Keystone Electric Co. 
R. K. HOKE, '15 

108 S. Grant St., Baltimore, Md. 

A. Donald Gray, '14 
Landscape Architect 



8120 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, Ohio 



SAFETY SAVES SORROW 

Many Bucknell "Grads" have been wis e enough to protect their lives with Aetna Life Insurance, 
their incomes with Aetna Health and Accident Insurance, and their business with Aetna Compen- 
sation Insurance. The Aetna is the largest company in the world writing these lines. 
THE WILLIAM S. ESSICK General Agency, Union Trust Building, Harrisburg, Pa. 

FRED V. ROCKEY, '12, Agency Manager 



18 



These Lewisburg Firms Support the Monthly; Patronize Them. 



COLLEGE LNIN 

Inseparably Linked With Life "On the Hill" 
GOOD EATS AND GOOD TIMES, THE LAW AND PROPHETS OF OUR MENU 

"ON THE QUADRANGLE" PAYNE, '09 


Lewisburg Trust 
and Safe Deposit Co. 

Commenced Business 1907. 

CAPITAL $125,000 

SURPLUS AND PROFITS, 87,000 
DEPOSITS 1,025,000 

Your Business 
Solicited, 

Appreciated, 

and Protected 

DANIEL F. GREEN, Treas. 


WAINIES 

Opposite the Trust Co. 
The Home of 

HOMEMADE ICE CREAM 
Luncheonette and Parlor 


Union National Bank 

strong Capital and Surplus 

Government Supervision 

Member Federal Reserve 

Employees Acquainted with 
Business and College World. 

SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES 

SAVINGS DEPARTMENT 

TRAVELERS' CHECKS 

Le Roy T. Butler, Cashier. 


"GRABS". Your Mail Orders for 

Bucknell or Fraternity Felt and 

Leather Goods will receive our 

Prompt and Careful Attention. 

H. F. DONEHOWER 

"Varsity Outfitter" 

W. L. DONEHOWER, '06, Mgr. 


Renew Your Acquaintance With 

"The Purity Special" Sundae. 

Take home with you a box of our 

HOMEMADE CANDY. 

THE PURITY 


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Local and 
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Phone 84 Lewisburg 


RAEZER'S 

Casn and Carry Groceries 
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W. A. BLAIR 

FRESH AND SMOKED MEATS 

Wholesaler of Pork, Sausage, etc. 

Fancy and Staple Groceries 

OYSTERS IN SEASON. 

J. FRED ZELLER 

JEWELER and 
OPTOMETRIST 


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Store 

Books, Stationery 

and School Supplies 

Mail Orders Promptly 
Attended to 

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H. J. Nogel Sr Bro. 

Jeweler and Optometrist 

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Engraving Watch Repairing 

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Exclusive Columbia Agents 


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Dealer In 

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530 Market Street 


WE WANT YOUR SHIRTS 

Mail 'em in 
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Tliompson, '04. Donehower, '06 

Milton Lewisburg Sunbury 


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Open 6 a. m. to 1.30 a. m. 

Rooms With Hot and Cold Running 

Water 

GEO. E. IRVIN, Mgr. 

Third & Market St., Lewisburg, Pa. 

Herman & Leiser 

Dry Goods, Notions, and 

Ladies' Ready-to- Wear 

Apparel. 


THE 

SHIELDS 

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Studio 


E. C. NOLL 

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AT 

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DR. E. S. HEISER 

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Developing and Printing 


W. C. Walls, John W. Bueher, 
Pres. Cash. 

The Lewisburg National Bank 

The oldest Bank in Union County. 
Established 1853. Capital $100,000. 
Surplus and Profits $100,000. 3% In- 
terest paid on Savings Accounts. 


DELMAR INN 
♦ 

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IREV'S 
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A. J. Irey, '79. 


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Alumni: Help us maintain and increase a waiting list of applicants for admission by filling 
out the blanks below: 



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Dear Sir: — 

The following are prospective 
college students of the first rank and 
should be on Bucknell's roll next fall. 
[ recommend them on the basis of 
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Signed 



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Dear Sir: — 

Please send information about 

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BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



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NOW OPEN FOR BUSINESS 

The Corporation Is Engaged in Commercial Banking, Loaning 

on Assigned Accounts Receivable to Substantial Manufacturers, 

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Capitalization 

20,000 shares of 8% cumulative Preferred Stock, non- assessable. Par value S50.00 per share §1,000,000 

20,000 shares Commoii Stock no par value. 

The business of the corporation is usually known as Commercial Banking, the advancing of money on open 
accounts, to responsible wholesalers, jobbers and manufacturers, who guarantee the payment thereof. Upon 
receipt of the proper documents 80% of the face value of the account is advanced, the balance being paid only as 
collections are received. Collection of the accounts is in the hands of the company borrowing the money. 

There is a demand for this kind of service far in excess of the ability of the existing companies to supply. 

The profits are exceedingly satisfactory. Existing companies are paying the required dividends on their 
Preferred Stock and earning an additional 25% to 50% on their Common Stock. 

Safety is the keynote of the business. Money is advanced only on the best of security to concerns that 
pass a rigid credit examination. 



Offi 



cers 



LOUIS W. ROBEY. President. 
Director of the Corporation. 
Alumnus of Bucknell University, Class of '04. 
President of the Overbrook Bank, Phila. 
Director of the Parkway Trust Co., Phila. 
Head of Real Estate Law, Temple University, 
Phils. 

JAMES A. TYSON, Vice President. 
Director of the Corporation. 
Alumnus of Bucknell University, Class of '11. 
General Agent, Equitable Life Ins. Co. of Iowa, 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

CHARLES L. KINSLEY, Secretary. 
Director of the Corporation. 
Manager, Geo. H. Buchanan Co., Printers, 
PhUa. 

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Manager. 
Director of the Corporation. 
Alumnus of Bucknell University, Class of '04. 



For five years Registrar and Business Man- 
ager of Bucknell. 

Lecturer in Department of Commerce, Temple 
University, Phila. 

O. J. McNITT. 

Director of the Corporation. 
Bucknell University, Class of '03. 
Manufacturer. 

Wholesale Producer of Furnace Limestone, Har- 
risburg, Pa. 

JOSEPH CHARLESTON. 

Director of the Corporation. 
Manufacturer, Phila. 

WM. A. PURKS. 

Director of the Corporation. 

Heating and Plumbing Engineer, Phila. 

Director of the Overbrook Bank, Phila. 



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Those who are located in towns with limited local banking facilities. 



Bucknell Alumni Monthly 



Vol. V 



Lewisburg, Pa., May, 1921 



No. 8 




BuckneU Varsity Baseball Team, 1896 



Two Eminent Bucknellians 



Baseball Season Opens 
Commencement Plans 



Wanted, Opinions 



75th Anniversary Commencement 
June 11-15, 1921 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



Bucknell Alumni Monthly 

LEO L. ROCKWELL, '07, 
Editor 

Published monthly during the college 
year by the Bucknell University 
Alumni Association. 

Entered as second-class mail matter 
at the Postoffice at Lewisburg, Pa., 
under the act of Congress, March 3, 
1879. 

Annual subscription to non-members, 
$2.00. 

To life members under the $10 plan, 
$1.50. 

To Ufe members under the new plan, 
it is sent gratis. 

To annual members under the new 
plan, subscription is included in the 
annual dues. 

Checks should be made payable to 
Frank M. Simpson, Treas. 



ALUMNI OPINION 



The following suggestions are submit- 
ted to the Open Forum as a basis for 
the reorganization of the Alumni As- 
sociation. The aim of the proposed 
planner of organization is to present a 
^eans which will ensure at once a great- 
er coordination of effort on the part of 
all the alumni in behalf of the institu- 
tion, and a flexible organization which 
shall permit the president of the Gen- 
eral Association to keep constantly in 
touch with opinion in all sections of the 
country. 

First of all, there should be devised 
a plan by which the alumni will be 
brought closer together in communities. 
Secondly, the central alumni organi- 
zation should knit together the various 
local units of BuckneU alumni through- 
out the country to the end that the 
broad fraternal spirit may be cultivated 
among all the local units, and there may 
be instilled in them a desire to build 
up and maintain a general alumni or- 
ganization which wiU work effectively 
on behalf of the institution. 

As to the local, or district organiza- 
tions, I am of the opinion that the 
country might well be divided into the 
following districts, determined on a geo- 
graphical basis: 

1. Maine, Vermont and New Hamp- 
shire. 

2. Massachusetts, Connecticut and 
Rhode Island. 

3. New York City and vicinity 
(Eastern New York). 

4. Central New York State. 

5. Western New York State. 

6. New Jersey. 

7. Eastern Pennsylvania. 

8. Western Pennsylvania. , 

9. Central Pennsylvania. 

10. Maryland aiid Delaware. 

11. Virginia, West Virginia and 
North Carolina. 

12. South Carohna, Georgia, Florida, 
Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, 
Tennessee and Kentucky. 

13. Illinois, Indiana and Wisconsin. 

14. Ohio and Michigan. 

15. Iowa, Minnesota, North Dakota, 
Missouri. 

16. Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas. 



16. New Mexico, Colorado, Ne- 
braska, and Wyoming. 

17. Colorado, Washington, Oregon, 
Idaho, Nevada, Utah, and Ari- 
zona. 

There should be a representative in 
charge of each district. This represen- 
tative should be a member of the ex- 
ecutive committee of the Alumni Asso- 
ciation. Some means of selection of the 
executive committee should be worked 
out, so that each district will have an 
able representative; my own personal 
feeling is that men more aptly suited 
for the position might be appointed to 
the executive committee from each dis- 
trict. 

The annual meeting of the Associa- 
tion should be held at commencement 
time. Prior to the meeting, the presi- 
dent, through the various executive 
committeemen, should make every ef- 
fort to obtain a large attendance. The 
meeting should be devoted to an ex- 
change of ideas as to the best method 
of developing interest in the local units. 
There should also be a plan of activity 
on behalf of the Institution which 
should be determined upon for the en- 
suing year. 

L'nder this plan of organization, the 
president of the Association could keep 
in touch with seventeen men through- 
out the United States and direct ef- 
fectively the work of the entire body 
of alumni. The details of the contact 
by the president of the Association 
with the executive committeemen 
should be left largely up to the indi- 
vidual. This is a simplified plan and 
there ought not to be any difficulty in 
putting it into effect. 

Sincerely yours, 

Romain C. Hassrick. 
® 

OPINIONS WANTED 



For several years Bucknell has 
been without a literary journal; the 
"Bucknell Journal", which was the 
last of the species to flourish at the 
Hill, expired in 1918. 

Such a publication is needed be- 
cause of the real training and inspira- 
tion it affords to the undergraduate — 
as many alumni who were associated 
with the old "College Herald" or the 
"Mirror" can testify. At the present 
time, too, there is a considerable num- 
ber of undergraduates interested in 
things literary, so that of late a de- 
sire for the establishment of such an 
organ has been expressed, and cer- 
tain members of the faculty and stu- 
dent-body have been foi: some time 
discussing its feasibility. 

Now there are three possible plans. 
The first is to merge the new under- 
taking as a monthly or bi-monthly 
supplement with the Bucknellian. The 
second is to establish it as an entirely 
independent venture. A third is to 
add it as a literary section to the 
Alumni Monthly. 

Of these the first plan is probably 
the least practicable. Such an at- 
tempt was made in 1905-06. The 
literary supplement which in that year 
was published with the "Orange and 
. Blue" failed to establish itself,, prob- 
ably because of the inherent disad- 
vantages of such an arrangement. To 
mingle news and literary material 



seems contrary to the American 
genius. In view of the editorial and 
linancial problems it would involve, to 
try this plan would be unjust to both 
periodicals. 

The second plan, that of establish- 
ing an entirely independent literary 
magazine, has manifest advantages. 
It would afford to those undergradu- 
ates chosen for the staff the practical 
training afforded by the entire man- 
agement of the publication. There 
would be no possibility of friction 
such as might arise under the first 
plan. And there would doubtless be 
a stimulus to the contributors in the 
added importance attaching to a pure- 
ly literary organ. 

On the other hand, there are grave 
disadvantages. With the cost of print- 
ing high as it is, there would be great 
difficulty in financing the venture. 
Unless a high subscription price were 
charged, a larger circulation would be 
required than the undergraduate 
body can give; and a purely under- 
graduate magazine would make but 
slight appeal to the alumni, who would 
be the only other source of subscrip- 
tions. Furthermore, advertising could 
not be relied upon to contribute to its 
support, since the only appeal of such 
a magazine would be to local adver- 
tisers, and they already have the quite 
justifiable feeling that they are "black- 
mailed" sufficiently for support of stu- 
dent enterprises. Given a skilful and 
energetic business management, the 
venture might be made a success, but 
almost inevitably a year would come 
in which the management would be in- 
efficient, and the publication would 
languish and expire. 

The third alternative, that of fusion 
with the Alumni Monthly, may seem 
at first view impracticable, but it is 
probably the most promising of the 
possible arrangements. Assume, for 
instance, that the present Monthly 
were expanded to contain twenty print 
pages (it now has twelve) , and as 
much advertising as could be obtain- 
ed; that the additional eight pages 
be assigned bi-monthly to an under- 
.graduate staff for student contribu- 
tions, being filled in the alternate 
months by special articles of interest 
by alumni contributors; that the sub- 
scription price remain the same as 
now for alumni, but a lower price be 
charged the undergraduates — h o w 
would this work? 

Perhaps the most obvious disad- 
vantage is the possible feeling on the 
part of each party that it was being 
"done" for the sake of the other. The 
undergraduate might well ask : "What 
interest have I in the Alumni Month- 
ly? Eight pages every other month 
isn't much. Where do you get that 
stuff, anyway?" and the alumnus 
might ask: "What interest have I in 
undergraduate literary work? I have 
too much else on hand to pay atten- 
tion to that sort of thing". A further 
disadvantage would be a possible dis- 
inclination of the students to submit 
their work to so learned and critical 
a body as the alumni. There would 
be, too, the eternal financial problem. 
The addition of eight pages monthly 
would mean an increased annual cost 
of approximately a thousand dollars. 
(Continued on Page Eight) 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



♦JM"*"*"**^"*"*"*"*"*"*-*"*"*"*"****"*"*"*"*"*"! 



..•»•..««••.••.#•••>•••••-•• 



-••••«•»•«• A 



The Anniversary 



♦♦♦••"•"•-•-•"•"•"•"•"••••••1 



-•"•-••••••••••-I 



COMMENCEMENT PLANS 

NEARING COMPLETION 



General Tasker H. Bliss will be the 
principal speaker at the Seventy-fifth 
Anniversary Commencement held this 
June. This is the most important de- 
velopment so far in the plans being 
formulated by the various committees 
in charge of arrangements. General 
Bliss's consent has been obtained by 
the Trustees' Committee on the Anni- 
versary, which is headed by Judge J. 
Warren Davis, '96. Dr. David Jayne 
Hill, will also be present if his other 
engagements permit. 

The other events of the week are 
gradually taking shape under the 
directions of the faculty program 
committee, of which Professor Nelson 
F. Davis is chairman. 

The program: 

Friday, June 10 

8:00 P. M.— Undergraduate Recital, 
School of Music. Buck- 
nell Hall. 

Saturday, June 11 
10:00 A. M.— Pipe Organ Recital, 
School of Music, Women's 
College. 
1:30 P. M. —Tennis. Bucknell vs. Sus- 
quehanna. College Courts. 

Sunday, June 12 
10:30 A, M. — Baccalaureate Sermon, 
President Hunt. Metho- 
dist Church. 
8:00 P. M,— Oratorio, Handel's "Judas 
Maccabaeus", Baptist 
Church. 

. . Monday, June 13 

10:00 A. M.— Senior Recital, School of 

Music, Bucknell Hall, 
3:00 P. M.— Baseball,. Bucknell vs, 

Susquehanna, Athletic 

Field, 
6:30 P, M.~Twilight Concert, Repasz 

Band, College Campus. 
7:30 P. M.— Senior Class Play. Com- 
mencement Hall. 
9:30 P. M. — Fraternity Symposiums. 

Tuesday, June 14 
7:00-8:00 A. M.— Alumni Breakfast. 

Academy Dining Hall. 
9:00 A. M. — Meeting of the Alumni 

Association. Bucknell 

Hall. 
9:00 A, M.— Meeting of the Board of 

Trustees. Carnegie Li- 
brary. 
11:30 A. M. — Meeting of the Alumnae 

Association, Evangelical 

Church, 
12:30 P, M, — Alumnae Luncheon. 

Evangelical Church. 
12:30 P. M. — Alumni Dinner, Academy 

Dining Hall, 
2:30 P, M.— Alumni Baseball Game. 
4:00 P. M. — Address to the Alumni, 

General Tasker H, Bliss, 

Athletic Field. 



4:30 P, M. — Seventy-fifth Anniversary 
Pageant. Athletic Field. 
6:30 P. M. — Alumni Supper and Class 
Reunions. Reunion Class- 
es: '71, '81, '91, '96, '01, 
'06, '11, '16. (Unless other- 
wise provided by these 
classes, table space will 
be reserved for each of 
them). Academy Dining 
Hall. 
Tuesday, June 14 
7:30 P. M. — Twilight Concert, Repasz 

Band. College Campus. 
8:30 P. M.— President's Reception. 
President's Residence. 
9:00 P. M.— Alumni Assembly. Tus- 
tin Gymnasium. 
Wednesday, June 15 
7:00 to 8:00 A. M.— Alumni Breakfast. 

Academy Dining Hall. 
9:00 A. M. — Academic Procession 

Forms. Bucknell Hall. 
9:30 A. M. — Commencement of the 
College and of the School 
of Music. Commencement 
Hall. 
12:00 P. M.— Corporation Dinner. 
Academy Dining Hall, 
Alumni headquarters for room as- 
signments and meal tickets, etc., at 
Women's College Ofifice. All alumni 
are requested to enroll in the Alumni 
Register at Headquarters. 

Automobiles will meet trains on Mon- 
day and Tuesday to convey alumni 
who may desire it to Alumni Head- 
quarters, 

Alumni wishing to leave an address 
for the forwarding of correspondence 
should have it marked "Alumni Head- 
quarters, Women's College, Lewisburg, 
Pa," 

All alumni who wish accommodations 
in the college buildings are requested to 
notify Professor Leo L. Rockwell, chair- 
man of the Committee on Entertain- 
ment, at once. 

The returning alumni will again be 
the guests of the Corporation. The 
Committee on Entertainment is mak- 
ing arrangements for the accommoda- 
tion of all who wish lodgings at the 
hill, and will make every effort to 
render their stay pleasant. Meals 
will be served as last year by the 
Home Economics Department, under 
the supervision of Miss Florence Fowl- 
er and Miss Olive Douglas, of the 
Home Economics faculty. Dean Anna 
R. Carey will as usual provide for the 
comfort of guests at the Women's Col- 
lege. 

The alumni are urged to begin 
making plans to take their vacation 
the third week in June. It is none 
too early to be looking up trains. A 
big attendance of her children is es- 
sential to making Alma Mater's 
seventy-fifth birthday party a success. 

® ^ 

Miss Nellylou Gardner is Dean of 
Linden Hall Seminary, a preparatory 
school for girls and young women, 
located at Lititz, Pa. 



»•»••.•'.•..«•.•»•»•»•»•..•«•»•»•»•.. t««..»»f.«..«H||.** 



AS OTHERS SEE US 



(Of course the unfavorable criticisms 
don't often come our way, though we 
should like to hear them. We quote 
below some of the flattering comments 
which have come, in the hope that 
this will stir others to comment of the 
contrary kind. Come along with your 
kicks! ), 

I am enclosing $2.50 for the Alumni 
dues and Alumni Monthly. I would 
very much like to have the December 
and future issues. I have received 
October and November issues, and as 
I keep all copies, I'd like to preserve 
my files intact if possible. — E. A. S., '11, 
Enclosed find check for $2,50 in pay- 
ment of my Alumni dues. I have neg- 
lected paying this, but the Bucknell 
Alumni Monthly makes a strong appeal 
and I answer it willingly. Bucknell is 
to be congratulated on its Monthly, and 
much credit seems to be due those in 
charge.— M. R. K„ '19. 

Enclosed find check for $1.50 to cover 
my subscription to the Alumni Monthly 
as required from life-members under the 
o'd plan. Congratulating you upon the 
attractive and readably enjoyable mag- 
azine you are preparing for us news- 
hungry alumni. — E. M. R., '13. 

Just a line, upon receipt of copy of 
the new Alumni Monthly, to say that it 
is a publication worthy of any alumni 
association of any university in the 
country. In make-up and material it 
is full of interest and the press work is 
A-1 at Lloyd's, You've something here 
that every Alumnus might well be proud 
of and in which everyone of us ought 
to take personal interest by submitting 
helpful suggestions and, better, by sub- 
mitting items of Alumni interest from 
his or her section of the country. Per- 
sonally, I think enough of the Monthly 
to quit paying subscription rates and 
enroll myself as a life member of the 
Association, — F, B. J., '03. 

I sure had an awakening last week 
when a copy of the Bucknell Alumni 
Monthly came to my lock box. I have 
been so absorbed in these Texas oil 
wells that I had almost forgotten that 
I had once been a freShman at Bucknell. 
But now since I read the Alumni 
Monthly I feel that I still have some of 
that Bucknell spirit in me when some- 
thing wakens it. So enclosed you will 
find check for $2, for which enter my 
name on your roll of subscribers for 
the Alumni Monthly.— T. W, A,, ex'14. 
As I am a life-member under the $10 
plan, I am enclosing check for $1..50 
for the Alumni Monthly, It has al- 
ways been mighty interesting, and in its 
new form is invaluable to us who are 
interested in Bucknell, — M, B, C, '10, 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



A »««.^.^^»»»n#~ »»»»».*«»■>-»»>"• —•*•"•"• " • " • " *-•"••*•"•"***"*"*"* " *'•* " *"** " 



.,%..%•••••••••-•••••••••••••••••••-•'••-•-•• ♦? 



About the Hill 



"Charley" Harvey, '00, 

Visits Friends on the Hill 



■'■■■■■■•■■•■■•■■•■■•♦^ 



Charles Way Harvey, '00, oq furlough 
from his work in China, returned to 
BuckneU for a brief visit April 13, 14, 
and 15. During his stay Mr. Harvey 
addressed the entire student-body in 
chapel services, talked informally with 
smaller groups, had personal conferences 
with students, and addressed the towns- 
people in the Baptist Church and at the 
Rotary Club. 

In all his talks Mr. Harvey put be- 
fore his hearers the problem of China 
and the opportunity and responsibility 
of America. In one of his chapel talks 
he brought a convincing comparison 
between the missonary work of today 
and that of the past by showing the 
parallel difference in war of today com- 
pared with that of former times. As 
war is no longer a war of armies, but 
of peoples, with every man, woman and 
child bearing a part, so the missionary 
effort of today is no longer a work of a 
few isolated missionaries in far-flung 
out-posts, but one in which every in- 
dividual at home must have a part. 

Mr. Harvey's intimate acquaintance 
with Chinese conditions, and his skill 
in analyzing and presenting the chief 
problems which confront China, made 
his addresses intensely illuminating. 

He will remain in this country until 
mid-summer, returning to the Orient by 
way of San Francisco in August. 

S. A. E. Founders' Day 

Al that the Fourth of July means 
to us as a part of America, Founder's 
Day means to a fraternity man, and 
Sig Alphs experienced the thing last 
Wednesday, March 9. The affair was 
more than one which savored of the 
most unique and sumptuous repast im- 
aginable; it had the flavor of a sym- 
posium, combined with an evening of 
smokes and music and good fellowship. 
Recalling memories around the found- 
ing of S. A. E. the toastmaster at the 
banquet brought forth points of interest 
and introduced speakers who put such 
things before the members to make the 
future of the Fraternity more in keep- 
ing with past ideals. 

The entire affair was arranged into 
a banquet and smoker. The older fel- 
lows started dropping in all day long 
and at seven-thirty grace was murmur- 
ed above a board set with all the deli- 
cacies of the season. Wilcox, '04, acted 
as toastmaster. Lewis, '98; Butler, '98; 
McNitt, '00; Tyson, '11; Bender, 'IS, 
and Stewart, ex-'22, were back for the 
occasion. — Bucknellian. 

® 

The relay team to be chosen to con- 
tend at Penn on April 30, will contend 
with teams from Gettysburg, W. & J., 
Muhlenberg, and Catholic University. 
* » » 

The annual freshman hop took 
place in the Tustin Gymnasium, April 
16th. 



Moyer Receives Ovation 

Professor David Moyer, of the Music 
School faculty, whose piano recital 
April 14 closed the series of recitals pre- 
sented by Mu Phi Epsiion, delighted 
the auditors who filled the Baptist 
Church in greater number than at any 
previous recital this year. The even- 
nmg proved a great personal triumph for 
Mr. Moyer, who was repeatedly recall- 
ed for encores. Music-lovers from many 
surrounding towns were present. 

During the evening Director Paul G. 
Stolz, of the School of Music, presented 
the newly appointed voice instructor, 
Mr. Robert Seaman, whose solo and 
encore pleased the audience. 

Mr. Moyer's program was as follows: 

Etude Symphonique, Schumann. — 
Twelve studies in form of variations. 

a. Ballade A flat Major, Chopin. 

b. Nocturne D flat Major, Chopin. 

c. Polonaise A flat Major, Chopin. 

a. Irish Tune from County Derry, 
Grainger. 

b. Honey, Dett. 

c. Juba Dance, Dett. 

d. Alt-wein, Godowsky. 

e. Scherzo, Grifies. 

a. Etude E Major, Paganini-Liszt. 

5. Nocturne, Scriabine. — For left 
hand alone. 

c. La Campanella, Paganini-Liszt. 

For the encore, at the close, Mr. 
Moyer played the Liszt Rhapsody No. 

10. 

® 

HILL AND BURG 

By challenging and defeating mem- 
bers of the Varsity tennis team, Ste- 
phen Goho, Jr., of Lewisburg, and Ly- 
barger, of Mifflinburg, won places on 
the team. The reconstructed line-up, 
consisting of Captain Brandt, Koch, 
Lj^barger, and Goho, is working out 
now in preparation for the formidable 

schedule which it faces. 
« «■ « 

Frill and Frowrn presented in Com- 
mencement Hall, on April 26, Oscar 

Wilde's "Lady Windermere's Fan". 
* * * 

The Bucknell Lyceum closed its sea- 
son with a program of early Pennsyl- 
vania stories told by Miss Kathryn 
Bennett, of Williamsport, on the even- 
ing of April 6. Miss Bennett gave a 
delightful rendering of Indian legends 
and stories of early settlers, conclud- 
ing the evening's entertainment with 
the story of the romance of John 
Penn, the grandson of William Penn, 
and the daughter of an Indian chief. 
» * * 

The seniors of the Women's College 
recently elected the May Queen for 
the annual May Day Festival. In ac- 
cordance with tradition, the name of 
the ruler of the day will not be known 
until she appears to govern her court 
on the afternoon of the pageant. The 
ones who were eligible because of hav- 
ing taken part in three May Days 
were: Lydia Coene, Barbara Coe, 
Marguerite Coe, Elizabeth Davis, 




William C. Purdy, '99, of Chico, CaU- 
fornia, %vho is special (Plankton) Ex- 
pert for the L'nited States Health Ser- 
vice, has been making extensive in- 
vestigation of the California rice fields 
with reference to mosquito breeding. 
Following up a similar investigation 
which he with others had made in Ar- 
kansas in 1918, Mr. Purdy supervised 
a careful examination in California in 
1919, and publishes the results of his 
%vork in Volume 35, Number 44, of the 
U. S. Public Health Reports. A num- 
ber of graphs illustrate the detailed ex- 
position of methods and results. Briefly 
summarized, the conclusion reached 
was that mosquitos do not breed in the 
rice fields themselves, but do breed in 
moderate or large numbers in near-by 
seepage pools and drainage ditches. 

In another article "Should Rice Rais- 
ing Be Prohibited Near Towns", in the 
November, 1920. issue of the "California 
Board of Health Bulletin", Mr. Purdy 
makes a plea for the control or removal 
of fields in the vicinity of cities or vil- 
lages, because of the dangers to public 
health involved in the presence of ma- 
laria-bearing mosquitos. 
* * * 

P. Blakiston's Son & Co. have just 
published the third edition of Pharma- 
ceutical Botany, revised and enlarged, 
with 238 illustrations and glossaiy of 
Botanical terms — a text-book for stu- 
dent of Pharmacy and Science, by 
Heber W. Youngken, A.B., Bucknell 
Class of 1909. Mr. Youngken graduated 
in Pharmacy from Medico-Chirurgical 
College, Philadelphia, and secured his 
Ph.D. in Botany from U. of P. a few- 
years ago. Mr. Youngken is one of 
iBucknell's students in Botany of 
whom Professor Davis is proud. 



Emily Devine, Lottie Dietz, Kathryn 

Fulford, Emma Fuhrer. Ruth Mount, 

Elizabeth Weidner, LaRue Unger, 

Martha Leiser, Freda Mackereth, 

Mary Reed, Verna Smith, Marjorie 

Sprout. 

* * * 

The contestants for the freshman 
prizes in declamation have been 
chosen. The women who wnll try for 
the prize are: Ruth Weidenhamer, of 
Lewisburg; Alice Ruhl, of Lewisburg; 
Lois Hamblin, of Lewisburg: Helen 
Graham, of SunbuiT; Jessie Wendell, 
of Philadelphia ; Rose Curtis, of Way- 
mart. The men are: Rajanond Faus, 
of Mifflinburg; G. N. Lenox, of Eliza- 
beth ; Harry Roy, of Malvern ; Roland 
Wendell, of Philadelphia; Ebenezer 
Williams, of Nanticoke; Wendell 
Woodside, of Clearfield. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



•••"••*•-•••••••*••"•"•••••••-• -•••( 



In the Public Eye 



*> .•«•»•>.•-•>.•■.•. 



.•^•^^•.•^•^•..•^•^•••^••••"•"•"•••••••••••••"••••"•"•••••••-•-••••••••••— •"••••••••••"••^•t 



••"•"•"•"•"•"•"•"•••I 



Hassrick Made Permanent 

Legal Aid Head 



Appointment of Romain C. Hassrick, 
'06, as chief of the newly created 
Bureau of Legal Aid, Department of 
Public Welfare, Philadelphia, has been 
announced by Director Ernest L. Tus- 
tin, 'S4, with the consent of Mayor J. 
Hampton Moore. 

This is the largest municipally con- 
trolled bureau of its kind in the United 
States. Its business has increased dur- 
ing the six months of its existence so 
that today it is handling 1,100 cases 
monthly. The Evening Bulletin, Phila- 
delphia, the newspaper of greatest cir- 
culation in the city, contained this edi- 
torial February 1, 1921: 

"The fact that the Legal Aid Bureau 
of the Department of Welfare is now 
dealing with a thousand cases a month 
proves" the necessity no less than the 
utility of this municipal activity. 
Though it is organized under city 
auspices, the bureau, in advising poor 
persons as to their rights, is largely 
served by volunteer lawyers and stu- 
dents of law. 

"It is exceedingly gratifying to know 
that the Law Association of Philadel- 
phia is among the organizations which 
lend support and counsel to the bureau. 
The civic and commercial bodies which 
are interested know that society is best 
served by protecting the lowly and the 
needy in the rights which the law guar- 
antees to them. 

"Especially useful is such a service in 
helping to Americanize foreigners who 
are too often the prey of unscrupulous 
persons seeking to take advantage of 
their ignorance. They are reached more 
impr-essively by a city bureau than by 
the praiseworthy societies which have 
given legal aid for years. The bureau 
stands as a further bulwark against the 
exactions of rapacious landlords from 
the poorest class of tenants, and this 
alone would justify its existence". 

"' ® 

Chicagoans Banquet 

and Elect Officers 



The Chicago Alumni Club held its 
second banquet of the year at the 
Great Northern Hotel on March 18th. 
Although there were only fourteen in 
attendance, the best of spirit prevailed 
and the informality of the occasion ad- 
ded greatly to the enjoyment of those 
present. The old songs and yells were 
given in the good old Bucknell way. 
New officers were elected for the en- 
suing year as follows: R. T- Parmenter, 
'14, President: J. Wolfe, '07, Vice-Presi- 
dent; G. T. Keech, '14, Secretary. The 
Rev. F. H. Fahringer resigned the sec- 
retaryship because of his contemplated 
removal from Chicago within the year. 

The Club is planning a Big. B. U. 
Picriic to be held as soon as weather 
will permit. All Bucknellians about 
Chicago are urged to be on hand. 



Hindman, Ex-'08, in 

Oregon Legislature 

C. C. Hindman, ex-'OS, of Portland, 
Oregon, was at the last election chosen 
representative to the legislature from 
Multnomah County. 

Mr. Hindman has served in a num- 
ber of civil positions during his residence 
in Portland. In 1913 he served as As- 
sistant LTnited States Attorney of the 
District of Oregon. The following year 
he was made Assistant District Attor- 
ney for the County of Multnomah. 
During 1918 and 1919 he served as As- 
sistant District Attorney for the City 
of Portland. In August, 1920, he was 
appointed one of five Commissioners of 
the Public Docks of the City of Port- 
land. 

He was married in 1914, and has two 
sons, Thomas, born February 4, 1916, 
and Charles C, Jr., bom May 21, 1920. 
® 

Director Tustin Attacks 

Dance Problem 



Roy G. Bostwick, '05, 

Forms New Law Firm 



Director of Public Welfare Ernest L. 
Tustin, of Philadelphia has opened a 
campaign against improper dancing as 
conducted in many dance halls of the 
city. After personal inspection of con- 
ditions and conference with welfare- 
workers, dancing-masters, hotel men, 
and others, Director Tustin has formu- 
lated a program which it is hoped will 
put a speedy end to the immoral con- 
ditions which have prevailed through- 
out the city. In his campaign he has 
the entire support of Mayor Moore. 
@ ■ 

Dr. Hill Slated for Foreign Post 

Persistent rumors that the Harding 
administration is looking for the best 
place to employ the diplomatic talents 
of Dr. David Jayne Hill are abroad in 
Washington. 

It is believed that one of the two 
most delicate positions in the foreign 
service will be proffered him ; that he 
will be asked to accept the post at 
Tokyo or to return to the more familiar 
field at Berlin. The latest reports seem 
to favor the German ambassadorship as 
the one in which he would be ab'e to 
make the best use of his thorough 
acquaintance with European conditions 
and his former experience. 



-^ih 



Dr. Frear Chief Chemist? 



Professor William Frear, '81, of State 
College, is being actively urged for the 
position of Federal Chief Chemist. 
It is felt that Dr. Frear's experience as 
chief chemist of the Pennsylvania 
Bureau of Foods and his long-time ac- 
tivities in experimental work make him 
the logical man tor the position. 
® 

Delta Sigma presented Kenyon's 
"Kindling" to an appreciative audience 
March 19. 



Roy G. Bostwick, '05, one of the 
Trustees of Bucknell, has formed a 
new partnership for the practice of 
law, having withdrawn from the firm 
of Brown, Stewart & Bostwick. His 
new partners, under the firm name of 
Thorp, Bostwick & Stewart, are 
Charles M. Thorp, '88, Cornell Uni- 
versity; W. Denning Stewart, '10, 
Washington and Jefferson College, '13, 
University of Pittsburgh Law School, 
and Charles M. Thorp, Jr., '16, Cor- 
nell University, '19, Harvard Law 
School. 

H. G. Florin, '09, is associated \yith 
this firm. The new business address 
of Mr. Bostwick is 387 Union Arcade 
Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

® 

"Prexy" Hunt, Good Sport 

The following editorial, taken from 
the "Bucknellian" of April 11, is a 
fitting tribute to "Prexy", character- 
izing accurately his attitude and 
methods : 

"One of the features of the open- 
ing game of Bucknell's baseball sea- 
son was the participation of Presi- 
dent Dr. Emory W. Hunt tossing up 
the first ball. This is typical of Dr. 
Hunt's attitude toward athletics. He 
is an enthusiastic believer in the value 
of wholesome sports, both to the indi- 
vidual and to socie+y, and in spite 
of his busy life as an educator and 
churchman, he never fails to find 
enough time to lend his encourage- 
ment to athletics. He is a very reg- 
ular attendant at p'-actices, and rarely 
misses a game. He enters heartily 
in'"o the spirit of sports, and uses 
sports methods in the performance of 
bis duties as Pres'dent of the Univer- 
sity. He plays the game fair and 
hard, and the enthusiasm he injects 
has a telling effect on the morale of 
h's con.cituency. His broadmindedness 
and effectiveness have won for him the 
approbation of all who come in con- 
tact with him and his methods". 
® 

A Surprise Number 



The early appearance of the May 
issue is due to the necessity of having 
it printed before the beginning of the 
printers' strike in May. The man- 
a.gement, confronted by the choice of 
having it appear early or having it ap- 
pear in all probability very late, 
chose the former alternative. 



-«- 



Mathewson Steadily Improving 



Newspaper dispatches from Saranac 
Lake indicate that "Big Six" is slowly 
but steadily recovering his health. He 
is now able to take auto rides, and has 
no cough or temperature. He hopes 
soon to be able to take light exercise. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



WILLIAM CYRUS BARTOL 

Forty Years a Bucknell Teacher 

By M. L. Drum, '02 



DOUBTLESS every Bucknell alumnus who casts his 
eyes on this page will exclaim, "What a good picture 
of Dr. Bartol!" before noticing a word of print. For 
them there is no need of printed word to introduce 
him. His face and form are inseparably intertwined with 
all the associations of college days. 

Some of the older grads may recognize the smaller group 
picture on page 10, but most of our alumni will not know 
that this group represents the "Varsity" of 71 and 72, the 
forefathers of college athletics. When other students work- 
ed off their surplus energy in croquet, and agitated for a boat 
club, these men supplied their own uniforms and with the 
he'p of a few public- 
spirited citizens of 
Lewisburg and some 
of their fe'.low stu- 
dents met the ex- 
pense of a schedule 
of five games, win- 
ning four. Score, for 
the season: Olym- 
pians (as they called 
themselves I, 159; Op- 
ponents, 108. William 
Cyrus Bartol, whom 
all graduates of the 
last two score years 
know as Professor of 
Mathematxs and 
Astronomy at Buck- 
nell, captain of the 
team, successfully cir- 
, c'.ed the bases sixteen 
times, held down first, 
then crossed the dia- 
mond to third, and 
ended the season re- 
ceiving behind the 
plat e — fielding and 
catcher's mitts not 
yet invented! 

A perusal of the 
records of those days 
shows him the presi- 
dent of Theta Alpha 
Literary S o c ie t y, 
which with Euepia 
at that time was the 
center of interest 
amcng the students, 
both business man- 
ager and editor of the 
Herald, and active in 
ail phases of college 
life. We notice that 
he paid his election 
expenses to his fellow 
members of Theta 
A'pha by presenting 
them on his retire- 
ment from office with 
"a large and delicious 
cake" and we pre- 
sume that some of 
the articles criticising 
the college catalog 
and the curriculum — 

for there is nothing new — and pointing out to the authorities 
their inexcusable neglect in not removing the trees from the 
baseball field and their failure to provide a pump to force 
water from the spring to the buildings on the hill, came from 
his pen or at least met with his hearty approval! Yes, as 
the boys would say in 1921, "He was a regular fellow". 

Some color is given to our presumption by the fact that 
he was a member of a college fraternity and while we do not 
wish to suggest that in any way our honored and learned 
friend would connive at any evasion of the rulings of the 
august faculty, yet we have a faint impression that fraterni- 
ties and secret societies were in those days not viewed with 




Dr. William Cyrus Bartol 



favor in high places, in fact were not recognized as affording 
a proper field for activity for the young gentlemen of the 
L'niversity at Lewisburg. But then, the records fail to show 
just when he became a member and so it may be that he 
joined in happier days when balmier breezes came from 
Olympus. 

After graduation Dr. Bartol for nine years held several 
positions as a teacher. He was instructor in mathematics 
at an academy in Connecticut, principal of the high school 
at Centre Hall, Pennsylvania, superintendent of the schools 
of Union Grove, Wisconsin, principal of the Huntingdon 
Academy, Pennsylvania, and professor of mathematics of the 

State Normal School at 
Afansfield, Pennsylvania. 
During his work at 
Mansfield he was fre- 
quently called upon to 
address teachers' insti- 
tutes. In 1881 he as- 
sumed the duties of the 
Professorship of Mathe- 
matics at Bucknell L^ni- 
v e r s i t y. Dr. David 
Tayne Hill was President 
then and common tradi- 
tion at BuckneU has it 
that the faculty wore 
full dress suits and ar- 
rived at the classroom 
door wearing silk hats! 
We wish we had a pic- 
ture of our friend in this 
regalia to present here- 
with. We have heard 
rumors of these silk-hat- 
ted gentlemen. One ru- 
mor states that a gen- 
tleman so clad was ob- 
served flying down the 
snowy hill on a child's 
sled and another rumor 
avers that behind the 
.\cademy one was no- 
ticed wearing a silk hat 
whi'e beating a rug! We 
do not believe that 
either of these rumors 
. can be successfully at- 
tached to the subject of 
this sketch. We believe 
they refer to another 
dear friend of ours, but 
doubtless tales could be 
told that would bring 
back fond memories of 
more regal raiment than 
is seen today and inci- 
dents more ludicrous 
than the above. 

In 1SS7 the Observa- 
tory was erected. Dr. 
Bartol supervised the 
construction of the 
building and the selec- 
tion and installation of 
the equipment. T w o 
years after, Dr. Harris 
came to Bucknell as her honored President, so our friend 
has seen the college grow from small classes to the present 
crowded condition, from the narrow curriculum and the 
meager equipment of the seventies to the clamoring situation 
of today. 

In 189.5 the degree of Doctor of Philosophy was conferred 
upon him by Adrian College, Michigan. Though carrying 
his full share of the teaching— and sometimes more than his 
share— he has published a text book in Solid Geometry, a 
treatise on Differentiation, has assisted in revising the mathe- 
matical works of Dr. French, and is an occasional con- 
( Continued on Page Nine) 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



WILLIAM EMMET MARTIN 

Fifty Years of University Service 

By Llewellyn Phillips, '92 



PROFESSOR MARTIN has been in the service of the 
University for a half century. Since this period of 
time leaves only about twenty-five years more for 
the entire existence of the institution, it establishes 
him in our midst as an historical figure. Then to pass his 
fiftieth year in silence would be to refuse to build up those 
traditions which distinguish one institution from another 
institution. For the traditions of institutions of learning are 
not created by curricula and buildings, but by men and by 
the recognition of the worth of men. The word which satis- 
fies the tradition associated with Professor Martin, a tradi- 
tion founded on impressions formed while I was still a boy 
in the Academy, is Martin, the Academician. He has served 
the University in a variety of ways, but he has permeated 
all of his service with that type of thought, speech, and cul- 
ture that distinguished the 
first academy in ancient 
Greece. 

In time his service may 
be expressed thus: twenty- 
five years, Principal of the 
Academy ; t w e n t y-fi v e 
years,. Librarian and College 
Professor. 

As a Principal he had a 
distinct character. Recent- 
ly I happened to be talking 
with a member of one of 
the first classes Professor 
Martin taught in the Acad- 
emy. He remarked that the 
young teacher, then in his 
early twenties, was known 
for his wide reading. The 
picture of those Academy 
days in my mind now is 
that of a man at the desk 
with books before him 
ready for reading and about 
him examples of classic art^ 
He conceived his office not 
in terms of administration, 
but of learning. As yet 
learning was not multifari- 
ous; subjects were few; the 
end was definite; the road 
leading to the. end clearly 
marked. In the Academy 
young men from shop, 
mine, and farm were to be 
conducted into a new world, 
the world of mind, where 
dwell those spirits who con- 
stitute a society that does 
not change with each age, 
but that stabilizes the 
changing social order of 
every age. Many a lad sat 
without saying a word 
while his Principal travelled 
from Greece to Rome, from 
Palestine to Europe, in- 
troducing the youth t o 
great names that with the 

increase of knowledge and experience became to the listener 
living personalities. The leader, so felt the youth, had found 
the Elysium of learning and by right of acquaintance with 
the immortals he could guide whom he would to the happy 
home of learning. Such companionship was not in the class- 
room, though it might be, but in the hall, in the parlor, any- 
where where chance gathered those who would wait and listen. 

Of course we all know and our Principal knew that this 
was not preparation in syntax and declensions for college 
classrooms, but he was also aware that many who were with 
him then would never again be at the door which opens to 
the eternal things of the mind, and that now or never to 
them that door must be opened. Last week Thomas P. 
Thomas' was appointed to the general managership of the 
Lehigh Valley Coal Company, the second largest anthracite 
company in the world. Last year he made a pilgrimage to 




the Library on the Hill to see the man who had received 
him from the coal mine and had first opened his mind to 
the learning of the ages before he entered upon his tech- 
nical training at Lehigh University. Our Principal was also 
aware of the psychological truth stressed by Professor James: 
"Strike whi'.e the iron is hot". Therefore he was desirous of 
having his students as they were awakening to the larger life 
of eariy manhood, go beyond the current that is often only 
temporary, into the larger life of the spirit. He did not con- 
cern himself much with what occupies the grammarian in 
the poem, "The Grammarian's Funeral", by his favorite 
poet. Browning: 

"He settled Hoti's business — let it t»e! — 
Properly based Gun — 

Gave us the doctrine of the enclitic De". 

But those who went on 
to college often recalled a 
suggestion and an inspira- 
tion of their Academy Prin- 
cipal. One such I knew, 
who has now passed on, 
who through a somewhat 
disappointing career and 
even in his closing hours, 
resorted for conso'ation to 
the literature of power to 
which be often remarked he 
was introduced in that 
Academy on the Hill. 

Twenty-five years Librar- 
ian and College Professor! 
The significant feature of 
our Library is the Libra- 
rian. That life with the im- 
morta's the Librarian still 
lives. The Freshman who 
comes asking for some 
book or periodical that is 
talked about or recom- 
mended cannot understand 
why he should be told: 
"This is not an ice cream 
parlor". The immature stu- 
dent does not know that so 
distinguished a scholar as 
Prof. Canby, of Yale, has 
pointed out that the liter- 
ary taste of college student.s 
is not so keen and pure as 
it was a quarter of a cen- 
tury ago, and that the Li- 
brarian was not raised on 
pre-digested literature. The 
modern student does not 
know that the Librarian is 
of the day when students 
were supposed to begin to 
accumulate a library and 
not to depend on the pub- 
lic and when all depart- 
ments of the college center- 
ed in the Library. Our Li- 
brarian strives to continue 
the tradidion of learning and culture. 

For no modern field is Professor Martin's mind better 
equipped than for that of Sociology in a college. Today the 
approach to all subjects is social, and conversely the app;;oach 
to Sociology leads from all departments. Literature, science, 
history, education, religion and even technical subjects call 
on .Sociology for contributions and Sociology in turn calls on 
them for their contributions. In a college so vast a field 
needs more than a specialist's approach ; it needs more par- 
ticularly an approach that will lead into many devious ways 
whereby the undergraduate may be oriented in a world 
whose meaning is social. True such a point of view precludes 
from the benefits to be derived therefrom that type of stu- 
dent who is putting in four years of life within college halls 
because he is not yet ready to go on to something more seri- 
( Continued on Page Nine) 



Dr. William Emmet Martin 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



Was He Right? 

From the "Hand-book of Alumni 
Work", published by the Association of 
Alumni Secretaries, we borrow an edi- 
torial originally printed in the Vanderbilt 
Alumnus. Despite its length, we think 
it worth reprinting, because of the clear 
light it throws on the mutual respon- 
sibilities of colleges and their alumni. 

"Hundreds of letters have been receiv- 
ed in the alumni office this fall from 
alumni in all sections of America, as 
well as foreign countries. Practically 
alt of these were enthusiastic and con- 
tained substantial endorsements of the 
program undertaken. There has recent- 
ly come one letter, however, which has 
attracted our attention because it was 
so different from the rest. It is a re- 
markable document. The author must 
be a strange something himself. No one 
except the person addressed knows the 
name of the writer of this letter, and no 
one else ever will know. The letter has 
been preserved, but the signature de- 
stroyed. But here's the letter: 

" 'I have had quite a number of circular 
communications from Vanderbilt, ask- 
ing for donations. Is it possible that a 
university like Vanderbilt is in such 
straits it is necessary to send out let- 
ters of solicitation to students of 
twenty-five or thirty years ago? I paid 
my tuition at Vanderbilt, had value re- 
ceived, and consider the matter closed'. 

"My dear mistreated man, you are too 
generous. You say you paid your tu- 
ition at Vanderbilt and 'had value re- 
ceived'. No, no, you got nothing. You 
wasted the time you spent here. That 
can never be recalled, for these precious 
years you can never be repaid. 

"But you probably would think more 
of the money than 'the previous years' 
of your youth. You paid your tuition. 
Vanderbilt took it. She was bound by 
honor and law to give you something 
in return. We need not stop here to 
consider the fact that no student pays 
in tuition and fees more than about 
one-fourth of the actual cost to the Uni- 
versity of giving him his training. A 
student pays a little more than .$100 a 
year. Against that Vanderbilt furnishes 
all the income from the endowment and 
the use of everything invested in 
grounds, buildings and equipment. To 
have secured these things alone would 
require a tuition fee four times as great 
as the student pays. 

"She can do this because of the fact 
that God didn't make everybody like 
the writer of this letter. He made most 
men more generous with some vision 
and with some passioti for good works. 

"But leaving all consideration of this, 
you still have been cheated. Even if 
you didn't pay Vanderbilt much, you 
paid what little you did pay, with the 
understanding that Vanderbilt would 
give you something in return. She gave 
you nothing. She made a failure of 
you and had as well admit it, whether 
you do or not. Of course, you owe 
Vanderbilt nothing. The opposite is 
nearer justice. Vanderbilt really owes 
you something for having taken your 
'pay' and making nothing of you. 

"We have never seen the author of 
this letter. We want to — such things 
are always interesting. Do you suppose 
he ever did an unselfish thing in his life? 
Do you suppose he ever votes? Do you 
suppose he ever goes to church before 



the collection? He is the kind of man 
who would whip children on Christmas 
eve to keep them from asking for candy 
on Christmas Day". 

®- 

When Is a Curve a Curve? 



Graduate Manager C. E. Glass re- 
cently dug up an interesting bit of 
Bucknell athletic history which has 
been going the rounds of the sporting 
pages of the country. This is the way 
Mr. Glass tells the story: 

"An amusing incident in connection 
with thfe progress of our national pas- 
time has recently been recalled by some 
of the patriarchs among the alumni of 
Bucknell University. It was the cul- 
mination of a controversy over the pos- 
sibility of curving a thrown ball, and 
occurred about the time in the history 
of the game in which pitchers first be- 
gan to develop the twister now in uni- 
versal use. The parties to the con- 
troversy were a Varsity pitcher and a 
former professor of mathematics. To 
the claim that he could see "the ball 
curve, advanced by the pitcher, the 
professor replied that it was contrary 
to the laws of motion, and absolutely 
impossible. An experiment was de- 
vised and conducted before a large 
crowd of spectators, to test their claims 
by eliminating all chance of an optical 
i'lusion. Three poles were set up in a 
straight line, and the "round-house ar- 
tist" was given the chance of proving 
his contention by throwing the ball in 
such a way that it passed the first and 
last pole on one side, and the middle one 
on the other. Mirabile dictu, he did it, 
and upset the professor's laws of motion 
(minus the truth about the air and its 
resistance). 



-®- 



Opinions Wanted 



In another column we print a state- 
ment of the proposition of fusing an 
underg:raduate literary publication 
with the Monthly. The Editor urges 
the alumni to read and consider the 
proposal, and to advise him of their 
opinion. The proposal should be taken 
up by the Board of Managers at its 
next meeting, and a recommendation 
made at the annual meetino; in June. 
Therefore as large as possible a body 
of alumni opinion should be before 
the Board in order that its recom- 
mendation should be thorouehly repre- 
sentative of the feeling of the alumni. 
® 

BIRTHS 



Born to Mr. and Mrs. G. G. Painter, 
March 20, a daughter, Edith Renshaw. 

Mr. and Mrs. Julius Seebach an- 
nounce the birth of a nine-pound 
daughter. May Esther, on April 14, 1921. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Fries announce 
the birth of a daughter, Agnes Caroline, 
on April 12, 1921. 

Born to Mr. and Mrs. D. Clifford 
Ruth, (Evelyn Hillies, Inst., 'ID, on 
December 13, 1920, a son, Richard Hil- 
lies. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederick O. Schnure, 
(Dorothy Bunnell, ' ), announce the 
arrival of Frederick O., Jr., of the class 
of 1942, October 29, 1920. 



Opinions Wanted 

(Continued from Page Two) 

Would the increased receipts cover 
this? 

Let us consider first this last prob- 
lem. There is every probability that 
if the subscription price were set low 
enough, nearly the entire student-body 
would subscribe. It would be wise to 
set the subscription price at the low-- 
est possible rate and rely on numbers 
to make up for it. The advertising 
could easily be increased. The in- 
crease in local circulation would 
strengthen the appeal to local adver- 
tisers, who even as it was responded 
well to the appeal made for the Month- 
ly last fall ; the increasing general 
circulation will make the appeal to 
foreign advertisers constantly greater. 
Moreover, the connection with the 
Monthly would make possible a con- 
tinuity of management, and serve to 
steady the undertaking. 

As to the second possible objection, 
student fear of alumni criticism, it is 
doubtful if that would really exist. 
The necessity of having their work go 
before the Alumni would probably 
serve rather as a stimulus to the stu- 
dents. At any rate it should inspire 
them to greater efforts, spurring them 
on to show the "grads" that the pres- 
ent student-generation is a worthy 
successor of those which have gone 
before. 

And as to the first objection; if a 
grad really feels that he has not time 
for the things that interest the cam- 
pus, is not that perhaps a sign that 
he should make an effort to get in- 
terested in them as a means of scrap- 
ing off some of the moss? — It will of 
course appeal perhaps a bit strongly 
to alumni generosity to allow the stu- 
dents to receive the magazine at a 
cheaper rate than they, but if they 
will look back to the financial status 
of their own student days and recall 
how big a dollar looked, they will per- 
haps be willing to make this sacri- 
fice. And to the student, the arrange- 
ment will probably make more of an 
appeal when he learns what the al- 
ternative plan would imply, and 
knows that he is being favored in the 
matter of price. 

And finally, does not a great op- 
portunity present itself to the com- 
Ijined magazines in the possibility of 
bringing into a more conscious unity 
the graduate and underorraduate 
bodies of the University? Will it not 
broaden and deepen the college spirit 
of the student to learn through the 
columns of the Alumni Monthly of the 
real basis be has for pride in Alma 
Mater in the records of those who 
have gone before? Will it not quick- 
en and refresh the loyalty of the grad- 
uate to be brou.ght again into contact 
with that atmosphere which exists 
nowhere save on the campus of the 
American college, and that minglinar 
of the serious and the burlesque found 
onlv in the soul of the college student? 
Will it not strike at that narrowness 
which tends to encompass us about as 
we become involved in the every-day 
hum-drum of life, and stir our slug- 
p-ish blood as we catch fresh whiffs of 
the familiar campus air? 

WHAT DO YOU THINK? 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



The Basketball Season— a Review 



A bright chapter was added to Buck- 
nell basketball annals during the sea- 
son just closed. Seventeen games play- 
ed resulted in thirteen victories and 
four defeats. All of the defeats were 
lost by very scant margins, and were 
suffered on the tail ends of long, hard ■ 
trips. Bucknell scored 454 points against 
their opponents 378. 

The team was built largely from new 
material. Only two men, Bihl and 
Dietrich, were left from last year's 
regulars. The large number of candi- 
dates who reported for the squad, made 
the problem of elimination a difficult 
one, so that the season was well under 
way before the best men had proven 
themselves. Two out of the first five 
games were lost before the team took 
definite form. After that they arose to 
every occasion except two: one at Get- 
tysburg in the third of three con- 
secutive games that week, when they 
were nosed out by one point in an extra 
period; and the other at Carnegie Tech, 
also on the third game of a three days' 
trip, and by the narrow margin of three 
points. 

Bihl was the outstanding star of the 
team. He scored 189 of the points scored 
by the team. He was always reliable on 
the defense. He pulled several games 
out by his individual work when they 
seemed all but lost. Dietrich was a 
mountain of strength on the defense, 
but did not do much scoring. Searles 
and Dayhoff were second in scoring 
honors, tallying 69 and 64 points re- 
spectively. Wilsbach developed into a 
fine forward and showed remarkable 
improvement during the season. He 



rank next in point-getting with 38 to 
his credit. 

The strength of the team lay largely" 
in its defensive tactics. Their whole 
system of play was built around this 
formation. To spectators it sometimes 
appeared lacking in aggressiveness, but 
it usually brought home the bacon. It 
did not produce as much action as some 
systems, but the action it did produce 
was very highly effective. 

Letters were awarded to the follow- 
ing men: V. A. Bihl, 23; John Dietrich, 
'23; Anthony Wilsbach, '24; H. O. Day- 
hoff, '23; Marvin Searles, '22; Charles 
Bunting, '23, and Alan Dinn, '23. Im- 
mediately after the award the letter- 
men met and elected Dietrich captain 
for the season of 1922. 

® ■' 



clean living and devotion to outdoor 
sports seem constantly to renew his 
vigorous body. We who are his com- 
panions on the Faculty, recognizing his 
work, respecting his scholarly attain- 
ments, have the same affection for him, 
deepened by the remembrance of 
many a kind act or word and enliven- 
ed by many a flash of humor. 
® 

William E. Martin 



William C. Bartol 



(Continued from Page Six) 

tributor to college and other papers. 
In 1913, in collaboration with Director 
Stolz, of the Music Department, he 
published a Bucknell Song Book, the 
words of not less than eight of the 
songs contained in the book being com- 
posed by him — this in spite of the fact 
that his graduation oration was "Poetry, 
a finished art". 

You who read these words have been 
his students. You know the affection 
and esteem in which he is held. You 
know how his hospitable home has been 
the rallying place for many at each 
recurring commencement. You know 
the kindly twinkle of his eye. You 
recognize that he never loses touch with 
undergraduate interests — that his avo- 
cations keep his spirit young as his 



(Continued from Page Seven) 

ous. Years of cumulative learning, 
stores of knowledge drawn from all 
sources of knowledge, are an excellent 
back ground for a subject whose 
boundary is still in dispute. 

During these fifty years Professor 
Martin has been more than a Principal 
and a Librarian and a Professor. He 
has been a servant in the church and 
communit}'". He has carried burdens 
not his own ; he has buoyantly mocked 
the doctors who predicted an early 
death for him. He does not judge an 
act by its possible or real reaction on 
himse'.f; few men are equal to him in 
the spirit of disinterested service. He 
lives in an eternal now. He is a fine 
example of what Arnold means by 
"Sweetness and Light"; that is, "To 
make reason and the will of God pre- 
vail". 

® 

BIRTHS 



Born to Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert Perez, 
February 23, a daughter, Eleanor May. 
Mr. Perez, who was a member of the 
Class of 1907, is home on furlough from 
the Philippines. 



RECEIPTS ON ENDOWMENT AND EQUIPMENT 

(Continued) 



Amount previously reported $20,742.88 

E. B. Donehower, Lewisburg, Pa 50.00 

Mrs. M. R. Loomis, Lykens, Pa 20.00 

C. E. Long, Pittsburgh, Pa 20.00 

W. C. Bartol, Lewisburg, Pa 100.00 

E. B. Weaver, Pittsburgh, Pa 10.00 

Rachel Davis DuBois, Philadelphia, Pa 5.00 

James L. Braddock, Mt. Pleasant, Pa 80.00 

Emory W. Hunt, Lewisburg, Pa 80.00 

Marie Volkmar, Williamsport, Pa 25.00 

Dr. A. J. Irey, Danville, Pa 50.00 

Eliza J. Martin, Lewisburg, Pa 50.00 

James S. Swartz, New York, N. Y 2,000.00 

Glenn V. Brown, Lewisburg, Pa 50.00 

Frank W. Dillon, Erie, Pa 50.00 

Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Johnson, Philadelphia, Pa. . . 500.00 

Dr. Elmer E. Keiser, Tacony, Phila., Pa 50.00 

John A. Morris, Santa Monica, Gal 10.00 

Samuel L. Wilson, Philipsburg, Pa 10.00 

E. A. Armstrong, Newark, N. J 1,000.00 

John T. Shirley, Pittsburgh, Pa 50.00 

C. D. Koch, Harrisburg, Pa 20.00 

Sarah R. Shorkley, Lewisburg, Pa 100.00 

Paul B. Lewis, Lewisburg, Pa 20.00 

William E. Martin, Lewisburg, Pa 60.00 

Samuel Seeman, Pittsburgh, Pa 50.00 

Walter W. DufF, Hillsville, Pa 50.00 

Ernest S. Burrows, Picture Rocks, Pa 50.00 

Llewellyn Phillips. Lewisburg, Pa 40.00 

Lerov Stephens, Lewisburg, Pa 75.00 

W. M. Woodward, McKeesport, Pa 200.00 

Howard Lpiser, Lewisburg, Pa 25.00 

Harry S. Bourne, Lewisburg, Pa 10.00 

Fred J. Zeller, Lewisbure, Pa 5.00 

Ira Sheppard, Newark, N. J 5.00 

Mrs. George Ogden, Philadelphia, Pa 5.00 



Lewisburg Chair Company 

Anna L. Reilly, Philadelphia, Pa .. . . 1 

Frederic B. Jaekel, Doylestown, Pa 

Emory B. Bickel. Mifflinburg, Pa '. 

Charles Grant Shaffer, Newark, N. J 

Naomi B. Lane, Trenton, N. J 

Evelyn H. McCaskie. Mayaguez, Porto Rico . . . 

F. M. Simpson, Lewisburg, Pa .' 

Walter K. Rhodes, Lewisburg, Pa 

Sterling R. Mench. Lynn, Mass 

Fred W. Robbins. Williamsport, Pa 

Coit R. Hoechst, Pittsburgh, Pa 

Vincent B. Fisk, WilkinsBurg, Pa 

Dr. Mary M. Wolfe. Lewisburg. Pa 

Andrew G. Loomis, New York, N. Y 

Ralph Elliott. Seattle, Wash 

B. K. Focht, Lewisburg, Pa 

Fred W. Lindi,g, Lewisburg, Pa 

Isabelle F. Bond, Lewisburg, Pa 

John H. Macalpine, Pittsbursrh, Pa 

C. Ray Speare, East Greenville, Pa 

Herbert K. Bower, Bellwood, Pa 

Belle Bartol, Sunbury, Pa 

Mrs. W. G. Payne, Lewisburg, Pa 

Frank E. Burpee, Lewisburg. Pa 

Mr,';. F. E. Burpee. Lewisbura-. Pa 

Walter C. Beaver, Franklin, Pa 

T. Lamar Williams, Mt. Carmel, Pa 

Horace B. King. Harrisburp-. Pa 

Harry J. Blair, Pittsburgh, Pa 

Eup-ene Kerstetter, Lewisburg, Pa 

H. D. Kresge. Cranford, N. J 

Martha E. Wolfe, Lewisburg, Pa 



250.00 

,000.00 

100.00 

20.00 

20.00 

3.00 

50.00 

200.00 

100.00 

10.00 

10.00 

15.00 

10.00 

100.00 

25.00 

10.00 

25.00 

10.00 

10.00 

250.00 

3.00 

5.00 

5.00 

10.00 

10.00 

5.00 

25.00 

100.00 

200.00 

50.00 

5.00 

10.00 

10.00 



Total to April 1, 1921 $28,313.88 



10 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



>«»»»9*.a»«»«»i 



"••••••••••-•-••I" 



Athletics 



•»«Ha»*t.ft~«»ft-«..«..«..«. A 



••••••"•«f« 



Baseball Opens With a Defeat 

GETTYSBURG, 6; BUCKNELL, 1. 
Bucknell's green team fail to con- 
nect consistently with the ball in the 
opening game on April 7, and for that 
reason lost to the strong Batttle-field 
battalion. Bellack, a freshman from 
Johnstown, pitched a good game, but 
a series of extra base hits in the sixth 
and seventh allowed Gettysburg to ob- 
tain a lead which was never threaten- 
ed. The score: 

BUCKNELL 

R. H. O. A. E. 

Jones, cf 1 1 

Gdaniec, If 

Kostos, 3b 3 2 

Linker, If 2 1 1 

Julian, c 9 2 1 

Wilsbach, lb 7 1 

DeCoursey, 2b 1 1 2 

Schultz, ss 1 1 1 1 

Bellack, p 2 9 

Dietrich, rf 2 

Harris, ss 1 1 



Totals 1 6 27 17 3 

GETTYSBURG 

R. H. O. A. E. 

Kvle, lb 1 1 8 

Gingerich, 2b 2 2 1 3 

Redcy, ss 1 1 1 1 

Plowman, cf 1 1 2 

Keiser, If 2 1 1 

Mordan, 3b 1 1 3 

Hersh, rf 2 1 

Schulis, c 1 1 12 

Wise, p 1 11 



Totals 6 12 27 19 

Bucknell 10000000 0—1 

Gettysburg 0001320 0—6 

Struck out by Bellack, 7; by Wise, 
11. Bases on balls off Bellack, 2; off 
Wise 2. Home run, Gingerich. Three 
base hits. Linker, Hersh. Two base 
hits, Hersh, Keiser. Stolen base, Jones. 
Left on base — Bucknell, 6; Gettys- 
burg, 7. Umpire, Logan. 



BUCKNELL, 15; DELAWARE, 8. 



In a game featured by heavy hitting 
and loose fielding the Varsity defeated 
Delaware, April 13. Bucknell amassed 
six hits for four runs in the first inning, 
driving Ramsey from the mound, serv- 
ing Grubb in like fashion in the sixth. 

The score: 

BUCKNELL 

R. H. O. A. E. 

Dietrich, If 1 3 1 

Jones, cf 1 1 1 1 

Kostos, 3b 3 3 3 3 5 

Linker, rf 3 2 1 1 1 

Julian, c 2 2 13 1 

De Coursey, 2b 3 2 2 3 

Schultz, ss 1 3 1 1 

Harris, lb 2 5 2 

Bellack, p 1 1 1 



DELAWARE 

R. H. O. A. E. 

Wilson, 2b 1 1 1 

Donoho, If 1 3 

Dantz, rf 1 2 

Madden, cf .....2 3 2 

McDonald, lb 3 3 9 2 

Underwood, ss 2 1 3 

Marvel, c 1 2 5 U 1 

Ramsey, p 

Robbins, ■ 3b 2 1 1 

Rothrock, cf 1 1 

Nutter, c 1 

Grubb, p. .....'. 2 1 1 

Carll, p 1 



Cockill Goes to Shamokin 

After whipping the Orange and 
Blue nine into shape, George Cockill 
will go to .Shamokin to manage the 
Eagle Silk Mill team of that place dur- 
ing the summer. He recently wired his 
acceptance of the ofEer of the Shamokin 
position, which will make him playing 
manager. He will have complete con- 
trol of determining the personnel of the 
team, and will himself hold down first 
base. 



-®- 



The Varsity of the Jubilee Year 



14 24 6 7 



Total 

R. H. E. 
Bucknel ..40130313 x— 15 19 9 
Delaware 02020030 1—8 14 7 
Three-base hits, Donoho, McDonald 
2, Linker, Julian 2. Two-base hits, 
Grubb, Jones. Struck out by Bellack 
10 bv Grubb 4, by Caril 1. Base on 
balls off Bellack 1, Grubb 2, Carll 1. 
Umpire, Logan. Scorer, Wheat. 

® 

The Varsity of Fifty Years Ago 



The oid Olympian baseball team, of 
which mention is made in Professor 
Drum's appreciation of Professor Bar- 
tol, was an aggregation of sluggers. It 
was no feat for them to run up a score 
of thirty runs. Of course the pitching 




Total ■ 15 19 27 10 9 



was of a different type from that to 
which the fans of today are accustomed. 
The more remarkable thing was that 
they usually ended on top in the slug- 
ging contests of the seventies. The 
season of 1871 shows the following 
scores: 

April 22— Olympian, 33; Hiawatha, IS. 

May 13 — Olympian, 44; Riverside, IS. 

Sept. 16 — Olympian, 37; Union, 25. 

Sept. 23— Olympian, 14; Union, 33. 

Oct. 21— Olympian, 31; Union, 16. 

Nov. 4 — Olympian, 33; Independent, 
16. 

The make-up of this Olympian team 
was: left to right, top row — J. Hump- 
stone, 71; H. H. Bliss, 70; H. S. Hick- 
man, 71; H. M. Shallenberger, ex-73; 
F. G. Teed, 73. Lower row — J. K. 
Bogert, 71; F. S. Marr, 71; Wm. T. 
Grier, 71; William C. Bartol, 72. 



The cover-page of this issue shows the 
Varsity baseball team of 1896. Reading 
from left to right, top row, these youths 
are: G. H. Catterall, e.x-'99, of Berwick, 
Pa.; Barclay Reynolds, Jr., '96, of St. 
Lukes Academy, Wayne, Pa.; Dr. H. 
B. Stanton, '97, of Burn Brae Hospital, 
Clifton Heights, Pa.; Rev. John A. Cut- 
ler, '9S, of 617 S. 57th street, Philadel- 
phia. Middle row — A. M. Devall, ex- 
■99, of 301-4 Mills Building, San Fran- 
cisco- Calif ; the late A. W. Geary, '98; 
Frank Hering, coach; Robert Brady, 
present address unknown; R. B. Mul- 
kie, '98, of Union City, Pa.. Bottom 
row — Rev. E. C. Conover, '99, of Free- 
hold, N. J.; Dr. A. R. Garner, '99, of 
626 DeKalb street. Norristown, Pa.; Dr. 
David S. Grim, '97, of 232 North 6th 
street, Reading, Pa. 

This stalwart team di- 
vided equally the games 
played that season, of 
which, however, only two 
were college games; it 
defeated Dickinson 16-10 
and lost to Penn State 
4-5. Other interesting 
games were with the 
Carlisle Indians, who 
were defeated 12-10, and 
with "Pop" Aldinger's 
Bloomsburg Normal 
team, which, after ob- 
taining a one run lead, 
ouit in the sixth inning 
"to catch a train", much 
to the dissatisfaction of 
the Bucknell contingent, as evidenced 
in the "Mirror" report of the game. 
The other games were played with 
town teams of Milton, Sunbury, Wat- 
sontown, and Dan'ville. 



-w- 



Athletic Council Meets 



The first meeting of the newly form- 
ed Athletic Council was held at Har- 
risburg, February 26. Present were: 
President Emorv W. Hunt; Professors 
E. M. Heim and B. W. Griffith; Dr. A. 
R. Garner, George W. Cockill; Professor 
John A. Davis, Fred Jaekel, Dr. 
Maurice F. Goldsmith, R. W. Thomp- 
son, Edward M. Green, P. G. Smith, 
and Graduate Manager C. E. Glass. 

Arda C. Bowser was elected football 
(Continued on Page Eleven) 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



11 




THE FIVE YEAR CLASS 
Will Have Its First Reunion This June 



Cockili Coaches Baseball 



Track Schedule Looks Good 



George W. Cockili, '05, who was 
selected by the Athletic Governing 
Board to take charge of the baseball 
squad, assumed command immediately 
after the spring recess. He has been 
working the candidates hard in the 
hope of finding a winning combination 
to represent the Orange and Blue this 
year. Coach Cockill's previous ex- 
perience at coaching Bucknell teams, 
with his successful managing of the 
champion Reading and Harrisburg Tri- 
State League teams and more recent 
piloting of the Bethlehem Steel Com- 
pany team at Steelton, make him the 
logical man for the position. He will 
evolve a winning team if it can be done. 

Only four of last year's Varsity team 
n-e sti'l in co'lege, so that the scramble 
for positions will be lively. Julian will 
probably do the catching. Beattie is a 
veteran pitcher. Kostos will hold down 
third base, and Captain Linker center- 
field. There are plently of candidates 
for the other positions. Pitchers are 
Bellack, Greeves, VoUmer, Wagner, and 
Hunt. For the other positions Harris, 
DeCoursey, Woodring, Dietrich, Dif- 
fenbaugh, Wilsbach, Richards, and 
Bunting look promising, but there are 
a number of unknowns who will crowd 
these men hard. At all events, there 
will be a pretty fight for nearly every 
position, until Coach Cockili assigns 
the permanent berths. 



The most ambitious track schedule of 
recent years confronts the Orange and 
Blue team this spring. It is: 

April 23 — Novice Meet, at Lewisburg. 

April 29-30— Penn Relays, at Philadel- 
pha. 

May 7 — Inter-class Meet, at Lewis- 
burg. 

May 14— Midd'e Atlantic I-C Cham- 
pionships, Baltimore. 

May 23 — Dickinson, at Lewisburg. 

May 30 — Central Pennsylvania I-C 
Conference, Harrisburg. 

June 4 — Gettysburg, at Gettysburg. 

Enough men are left from last year's 
team to ensure a good nucleus about 
which to build, and the Novice Meet 
is expected to disclose worth-while new 
material. The old men who are count- 
ed on to hold up Bucknell's colors are: 
Captain Robert Williams, '22, at the 
weights; A. H. Haslam, '23, college-re- 
cord holder for the pole-vault; F. U. 
Davis, '23, in the distance-runs; B. W. 
Hahn, '23, in the quarter-mile; A. J. 
Dinn, '23, in the broad-jump; H. O. 
Dayhoff, in the hurdles; E. W. Tread- 
well, in the high-jump and hurdles; H. 
T. Moore, in the quarter and half-mile; 
K. D .Wren, '23; M. M. Chapman, '23; 
N. W. Morgan. '23; E, B. Sisserson, '22; 
E. W. Ross, '22; P. G. Schmidt, '22; H. 
W. Jones, '23. 

If the freshman class contains ma- 
terial to measure up to last year's class, 
Bucknell should be represented by one 
of the best teams in her history. 



Athletic Council Meets 

(Continued from Page Ten) 

capta n and Voris Linker baseball cap- 
tain for the ensuing seasons. 

It was decided not to enter the pro- 
posed basketball conference, but to take 
out membership in the C. P. C. T. C, 
and send representatives to its annunl 
meet with the recommendation to the 
conference that the limitation of stu- 
dent enrollment to less than 500 be 
dropped. 

A football "B" was voted to Francis 
P. McDermott. 

The selection of a baseball coach was 
referred to a committee consisting of 
the local members of the Council. 

A track schedule was approved, call- 
ing for participation in the Penn Relays 
April 30; an interclass meet May 7; M. 
A. S. C. A. C. Championships May 14; 
a meet with Dickinson at Lewisburg, 
May 21; C. P. C. T. C, May 30; a 
meet with Gettysburg at Gettysburg, 
June 4. 

® 

"Hail! All Hail! Bucknell!" 



The Monthly resumes in this issue 
the series of songs which was interrupt- 
ed by the overabundance of materia! 
in the last few months. 

Both the words and music of "Hail! 
AH Hail! Bucknell! " were composed by 
the Rev. Harry Moore Lowry, '77, who 
proves, in them, to have inherited the 
musical genius of his father. Dr. Robert 
Lowry, '54. 



12 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



Daill HUlbail! Bucknell 



Words and Muiic by 
Harry Moote Lowty, B. U. '77 




s— • 



±4 



± 



» 



Alma Mater fair- 



College dear, on hill of beauty. Alma Mater fair- -Child of faith and 

Richest treasures thou did'st give us. Halting footsteps tend. Ministering to 

In the tumult, toil and battle, 'Round our hearts entwine Memories of 

Raises on high thy glorious standard ! Wave thy colors true ! Gleam of morn me- 



a 



■i-it 



m 



m 



m. 



t [I wTf" 



^ 



:^=f=t 



m 



^ 



=rt 



ZC 



hope and courage, Sacrifice and prayer — Spirits of our noble fathers, Summon us to tell, 
life's enrichment, Guardian, Guide and Friend. So with grateful hearts we offer Thee an Immortelle- 
high endeavor, Fellowship divine. Tho' in far-ofT lands we wander; Or in Homeland dwell, 
ndian splendor. Orange and the Blue. Loyal hearts pledge full allegiance. Loving bosoms swell 

-m^ ^— .-P Pt- 



t^ 



"^^ 



^ 



^^ff#ftff 



I* 




chorus 



J l r:lJ-JJiH^,iin 



^ 



-^ 



By our deeds and deep devotion, What we owe Bucknell. 
Love and loyalty undying — Mother dear Bucknell. 
At thy call thy children gather, Praising thee. Buckneli! 
As we spread abroad thy glory. Hail, all hail Bucknell ! 



Alma Mater. Alma Mater. 



S 



^ 



£ 



:^ 



L^ 



'rrfr'i^-^^^^ ^ 



*-^ 



^ 



weave thy magic spell Over alNthy sons and daughtei=. — Hail, all Kail. Bucknell' 



r i g'UJ l r 



m 



:^=t 






BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



13 



For Real Service, Let B. U. Men Serve You 



During the past fe'^v years over five hundred (500) Bucknell Students have taken 
out Life Insurance policies ■with the Equitable Life of lo^va. Successful men invari- 
ably are men -who, in early years, realized the value of life insurance. 

Life Insurance makes for Success 

Tyson, 11 RICE ^ TYSON, Gen. Agts., 906 Kunkel Bldg., Harrishurg, Pa. 



Andrew A. Leiser Andrew A. Leiser. Jr. 
U. al L.. '69 B. U.. 'ge, Yale. '99 

Law Offices of 
Andrew Albright Leiser 
Andrew Albright Leiser, Jr. 

Lewisburgh, Union County 
Pennsylvania 


G. F. RASSWEILER 

Professor of Public Speaking, 

BUCKNELL UNIV. 

Dramatic Reader, Lecturer, and 
Entertainer. 


WM. R. FOLLMER 

ATTORNEY-AT-LAW 
Notary in Office 

Lewisburg Pennsylvania 


H. B. WEAVER, 14 

Catalogs, Yearbooks, House 
Organs. 

THE PITTSBURGH PRINT- 
ING CO. 
530 Fernando St., 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 


Ralph L. Belford, '05 

Attorney-at-Law 
Milton, Pa. 


John F. Winkelhlech, '14 
Invest in a Farm! 

E. A. STROUT FARM AGENCY 
Knows the Good Ones, 
Advertises and Sells Them. 
Phone 113R8 Lewisburg, Pa. 



FOR LEGAL SERVICE IN PITTSBURGH 

'96— A. C. ROHLAND, 1203 Oliver Building. 

'00— H. B. WASSELL, 1404 Union Bank Building. 

'04— E. P. GRIFFITHS, % Legal Dept., Philadelphia Co. 

'05— E. A. MORTON, 1204 Park Building. 

'05— R. G. BOSTWICK, 1101 Berger Building. 

'09— H. G. FLORIN, 1101 Berger Building. 



WHEN IN ATLANTIC CITY 

Remember 

The Chelsea Baptist Church 

is on Atlantic Ave., between 

Brighton and Morris 

THOS. J. CROSS, D.D., '91, Minister 

PAUL G. SMITH,'05 

Attorney-at-Law 

HARRISBURG, PA. 

State Department practice, in- 
cluding Corporation Tax and 
Public Service Commission mat- 
ters. 



Harold C. Edwards,' 1 5 
Attorney-at-Law 

Stroudsburg, Penna. 

Geo. P. Miller, '84 
FIRE INSURANCE 

82 University Ave., Lewisburg, Pa. 



New and Used Motors Phone 

Heavy Construction Calvert 

Rewinding 3573 

The Keystone Electric Co. 

R. K. HOKE, 'IB 

108 S. Grant St., Baltimore, Md. 

A. Donald Gray, '14 
Landscape Architect 

8120 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, Ohio 



SAFETY SAVES SORROW 

Many Bucknell "Grads" have been wis e enough to protect their lives with Aetna Life Insurance, 
their incomes with Aetna Health and Accident Insurance, and their business with Aetna Compen- 
sation Insurance. The Aetna is the largest company in the world writing these lines. 
THE WILLIAM S. ESSICK General Agency, Union Trust Building, Harrisburg, Pa. 

FRED V. ROCKEY, '12, Agency Manager 



14 



These Lewisburg Firms Support the Monthly ; Patronize Them. 



COLLEGE IIVIV 



Inseparably Linked With Life "On the Hill" 
GOOD EATS AND GOOD TIMES, THE LAW AND PROPHETS OF OUR MENU 

PAYNE, '09 



"ON THE QUADRANGLE" 



Lewisburg Trust 
and Safe Deposit Co. 

Commenced Business 1907. 

CAPITAL $125,000 

SURPLUS AND PROFITS, 87,000 
DEPOSITS 1,025,000 

Your Business 
Solicited, 

Appreciated, 

and Protected 

DANIEL F. GREEN, Treas. 

Renew Your Acquaintance With 
"The Purity Special" Sundae. 

Take home with you a box of our 
HOMEMADE CANDY. 

THE PURITY 
W. A. BLAIR 

FRESH AND SMOKED MEATS 

Wholesaler of Pork, Sausage, etc. 

Fancy and Staple Groceries 

OYSTERS IN SEASON. 

J. FRED ZELLER 

JEWELER and 
OPTOMETRIST 



J. C. REEDY 

Dealer In 

Furniture and Carpets 

530 Market Street 

THE 

SHIELDS 

Photographic 
Studio 

Distinctive Stationery 

AT 

BAKER'S PHARMACY 

DELMAR INN 



A. J. DUNKLE, Prop. 



WAI N I ES 

Opposite the Trust Co. 
The Home of 

HOMEMADE ICE CREAM 
Luncheonette and Parlor 

"GRADS". Your Mail Orders for 

Bucknell or Fraternity Felt and 

Leather Goods will receive our 

Prompt and Careful Attention. 

H. F. DONEHOWER 

"Varsity Outfitter" 

W. L. DONEHOWER, '06, Mgr. 

JAS. P. BENNETT 

Local and 
Long Distance Hauling 



Phone 84 



Lewisburg 



University Book 
Store 

Books, Stationery 
and School Supplies 

Mail Orders Promptly 
Attended to 

We Pay Postage 

WE WANT YOUR SHIRTS 

Mail 'em in 
Peerless Laundry 

Thompson, '04. Donehower, '06 

Milton Lewisburg Sunbury 

E. C. NOLL 

THE 
FEED. MAN 

DR. E. S. HEISER 

DRUGGIST 
Developing and Printing 

IREV'S 
SHOE STORE 

A. J. Irey, '79. 



Union National Bank 

strong Capital and Surplus 

Government Supervision 

Member Federal Reserve 

Employees Acquainted with 
Business and College World. 



SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES 

SAVINGS DEPARTMENT 

TRAVELERS' CHECKS 



Le Roy T. Butler, Cashier. 

RAEZER'S 

Cast and Carry Groceries 
Lewisburg and Milton. 

H. J. Nogel & Bro. 

Je-weler and Optometrist . 

Le'wisburg, Pennsylvania 

Engraving Watch Repairing 

GRENOBLE BROS. 

University Jewelers 

Exclusive Columbia Agents 

STEININGER CAFE 

Open 6 a. m. to 1.30 a. m. 

Rooms With Hot and Cold Running 

Water 

GEO. E. IRVIN, Mgr. 

Third & Market St., Lewisburg, Pa. 

Herman & Leiser 

Dry Goods, Notions, and 

Ladies' Ready-to- Wear 

Apparel. 



W. C. Walls, 
Pres. 



John W. Bucher, 
Cash. 



The Lewisburg National Bank 

The oldest Bank in Union County. 
Established 1853. Capital $100,000. 
Surplus and Profits 8100,000. 3% In- 
terest paid on Savings Accounts. 

HILL'S DRUG STORES 

2 Stores 2 
Lewisburg, Penna. 



Transact Your Business In Lewisburg Through Our Advertisers. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



15 



ADVERTISING RATES 

ITime 4 Times 6 Times 

1 inch deep, 1 column $ 1.00 $ 3.50 S 5.00 

1 inch deep, 3 columns 3.00 10.00 14.00 

Vi page 6.00 22.50 32.00 

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Full Page 15.00 57.50 85.00 



Send Copy 

to 

H. S. EVERETT, 

Lewisburg, Pa. 



FISK TEACHERS' 
AGENCY 

549 Union Arcade, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Teachers urgently needed 
for high grade positions. 



Teachers for 
Schools 



Schools for 
Teachers 



NATIONAL TEACHERS' AGENCY, Inc. 

D. H. Cook, Mgr., 326-27-28 Perry BIdg., 1530 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
"I HAVE PROMOTED OVER 15,000 TEACHERS. WHY NOT YOU?"— D. H. Cook. 

Bucknell Graduates Wanted. Have Placed Hundreds of Them 



Under the Same Management Thirty- 
Seven Years 
The School Bulletin Teachers' 
Agency has on its lists many Buck- 
nell graduates, and has placed Buck- 
nell men and women in high and nor- 
mal schools in New York, New Jer- 
sey, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, 
Vermont, Kentucky, West Virginia 
and Texas. An agency which per- 
sonally recommends its members to 
places for which it has been asked 
to offer candidates. Registration 
blanks and full information on re- 
quest. 
C.W.Bardeen, Mgr., Syracuse, N. Y. 



Modern Teachers' 
Bureau 

1C02 Market St., Philadelphia 

Needs Hundreds of High Grade 
Teachers for every department of 
educational work. 

FREE REGISTRATION 

and no expense unless position is 
secured. 



MOORE BUILDING 
SUPPLY CO. 

Milton, Pa. 

Distributors of 

All Kinds of Building 
Material 

Agents for 

Johns-Manville Co. 



BUCKINELL UfsIIVERSITV 

EMORY W. HUNT, D. D., LL. D., PRESIDENT 

Alumni : Help us maintain and increase a waiting list of applicants for admission by filling 



out the blanks below: 

THERON CLARK, Registrar 

Dear Sir: — 

The following are prospective 
college students of the first rank and 
should be on Bucknell's roll next fall. 
I recommend them on the basis of 
scholarship and leadership. 



Signed 



Theron Clark, Registrar 
Dear Sir: — 

Please send information about 

. . .Arts Courses 

. . .Preparation for Ministry 

. . .Preparation for Teaching 

...Preparation for Law 

. . . Preparation for Medicine 

...Preparation for Business 

...Preparation for Social Work 

. -. . Mechanical Engineering 

. . . Electrical Engineering 

. . . Civil Engineering 

. . . Chemical' Engineering 

. . .Science Courses 

. . .School of Music 

...General Catalog 

. . .Campus Views 

. . . Expenses 

.. .Application for Admission 

To 



Signed 



G. G. PAINTER, '17, President 



Printers of the Alumni Monthly 



The Sun Printing Qf Binding Co., Inc. 

Designers and Proaucers oi 

DISTINCTIVE PRINTING 

Booklets, Catalogues, Direct-by-Mail Advertising, Orfice Forms, Etc. 

Sun Building, WiUiamsport, Pa. 



192213 



16 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



COMMERCIAL ADVANCE CORPORATION 
NOW OPEN FOR BUSINESS 

The Corporation Is Engaged in Commercial Banking, Loaning 

on Assigned Accounts Receivable to Substantial Manufacturers, 

Jobbers and Wholesalers 



Capitalization 

20,000 shares of 8% cumulative Preferred Stock, non-assessable. Par value $50.00 per share $1,000,000 

20,000 shares Common Stock no par value. 

The business of the corporation is usually known as Commercial Banking, the advancing of money on open 
accounts, to responsible wholesalers, jobbers and manufacturers, who guarantee the payment thereof. Upon 
receipt of the proper documents 80% of the face value of the account is advanced, the balance being paid only as 
collections are received. Collection of the accounts is in the hands of the company borrowing the money. 

There is a demand for this kind of service far in excess of the ability of the existing companies to supply. 

The profits are exceedingly satisfactory. Existing companies are paying the required dividends on their 
Preferred Stock and earning an additional 25% to 50% on their Common Stock. 

Safety is the keynote of the business. Money is advanced only on the best of security to concerns that 
pass a rigid credit examination. 



Offi 



cers 



LOUIS W. ROBEY, President. 
Director of the Corporation. 
Alumnus of Bucknell University, Class of '04. 
President of the Overbrook Bank, Phila. 
Director of the Parkway Trust Co., Phila. 
Head of Real Estate Law, Temple University, 
Phila. 

JAMES A. TYSON, Vice President. 
Director of the Corporation. 
Alumnus of Bucknell University, Class of '11. 
General Agent, Equitable Life Ins. Co. of Iowa, 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

CHARLES L. KINSLEY, Secretary. 
Director of the Corporation. 
Manager, Geo. H. Buchanan Co., Printers, 
Phila. 

WALTER S. WILCOX, Treasurer and General 
Manager. 
Director of the Corporation. 
Alumnus of Bucknell University, Class of '04. 



For five years Registrar and Business Man- 
ager of Bucknell. 

Lecturer in Department of Commerce, Temple 
University, Phila. 

O. J. McNITT. 

Director of the Corporation. 
Bucknell University, Class of '03. 
Manufacturer. 

Wholesale Producer of Furnace Limestone, Har- 
risburg, Pa. 

JOSEPH CHARLESTON. 

Director of the Corporation. 
Manufacturer, Phila. 

WM. A. PURKS. 

Director of the Corporation. 

Heating and Plumbing Engineer, Phila. 

Director of the Overbrook Bank, Phila. 



Subscription Terms 



One share of Preferred Stock and one share of Common Stock are being sold for a limited time at $60.00 
per block, payable $10.00 with the subscription, and the balance $10.00 per month. 
After June 1st the price of one block of stock will be $65.00. 
For more complete information address 

WALTER S. WILCOX, Treas., 

604 Victory Bldg., 1001 Chestnut St^ 
Philadelphia 



Pa. 



WHO USES THIS SERVICE? 

Those who have a profitable business with an excess of plant capacity over their invested capital. 
Those who have an expanding business and prefer to give us a small profit temporarily rather than to give 
a large profit permanently to new partners or stockholders. 

Those who, because of large investments in real estate, plant, machinery or other fixed assets, have msuf- 

ficient liquid capital. 

Those who are more experienced in manufacturing and commercial hues than m financmg. 
Those who are located in towns with limited local banking facilities. 



Bucknell Alumni Monthly 



Vol. V 



LEWISBURG, PA., JUNE, 1921 



No. 9 



75th Anniversary Commencement 

June 11-15, 1921 

Be There 




■■^« . . ^C*' 




■„■;.'*■_ ■. ■■^.■•,^.;i>,:^.lf3>■ 



THE CHEMICAL LABORATORY 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



Bucknell Alumni Monthly 

LEO L. ROCKWELL, '07, 
Editor 

Published montlily during tlie college 
year by the Buckuell University Alumni 
Association. 

Entered as second-class mail matter at 
the Postoffice at Lewisburg, Pa., under 
act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

Annual subscription to non-members, 
$2.00. 

To life members under the $10 plan, 
$1.50. 

To life members under the new plan, 
it is sent gratis. 

To annual members nnder the new 
plan, subscription is included in the an- 
nual dues. 

Checks should be made payable to 
Frank M. Simpson, Treas. 



Do You Want a Receipt ? 

Professor F. M. Simpson, Treasurer 
of the Alumni Association, makes the 
announcement, that unless specially 
requested, no further receipts will be 
sent for payment of Alumni dues. 
Pay him by check and let the check 
ser\'e as receipt, or, if you wish a spe- 
cial receipt, STATE THAT DESIRE 
IN YOUR LETTER. 



To the Alumni 

You have received within the past sev- 
eral weeks the program for the seventy- 
tifth anniversary Commencement, the 
liersonal invitation from President Hunt 
to be present at that event, and the in- 
quiry from the Entertainment Commit- 
tee as to whether you will be present. 
HAVE YOU REPLIED? 

Last year in return to over three thou- 
sand cards sent out, the Committee re- 
ceived somewhat over a thousand re- 
plies. That is to say, one in three of 
the alumni had the courtesy to notifj^ 
the committee whether he would need 
to be provided for. Of those who did 
not reply, a number arrived at Com- 
mencement surprised that no accommo- 
dations were provided for them. WAS 
THIS FAIR? 

This year, in response to thirty-five 
hundred cai'ds, eleven hundred have at 
this date, June 2, been received. It is 
a matter of importance to the committee 
to have these replies in order that ade- 
quate provision may be made for all. 
The university is making every effort in 
its power to make up for the deficient 
lodging facilities of Lewisburg by throw- 
ing open the college buildings to the 
alumni, and is anxious to welcome all 
who can come back to the old campus. 
t)OES NOT THIS GENEROSITY' MERIT 
AT LEAST THE COURTESY OF A RE- 
PLY? 

■ m ■ 

Repasz Band Here in '75 

The engagement of the Repasz band, of 
Williamsport, to give the twilight con- 
certs at Commencement this year recalls 
the fact that this was the organization 
chosen to furnish the music at the Twen- 
ty-fifth Anniversary Commencement in 
1875. The report of the Class Lay exer- 
cises at that Commencement quaintl,y 
states: "The birds and the Repasz band, 
of Williamsport, furnished the sweetest 
of mingled music, while a refreshing 
breeze and the shade of the forest oaks 
tempered the heat to a grateful mild- 
ness." 




DR. HILL ON PEACE 

The March issue of The Scientific 
Montlily contains an article by Dr. David 
Jayne Hill, 74, entitled "Some Prelimi- 
naries of Peace." It is the restatement of 
an address delivered by Dr. Hill before the 
section of Social and Political Science of 
tlie American Association for the Ad- 
vancement of Science. 

In the discussion Dr. Hill show's the 
fallacy of expecting the permanent dura- 
tion of a peace imposed by military force 
and defends the thesis that the only 
durable peace is one founded on "the 
provision of redress without a resort to 
arms." It is the recognition of a right 
to those conditions of life that are essen- 
tional to the satisfaction of a people's 
needs, and the establishment of a trib- 
unal before which a nation's wrongs may 
obtain the judgment of a just judge." 

"What is needed at this time is a re- 
organization of the Society of Nations 
as a whole, including all peoples that 
maintain a responsible government; and 
the test of a responsible government is 
acceptance of International Law, which 
is based on the inherent rights of sov- 
ereign states, and obedience to that law. 
What International Law is can only be 
determined by a properlj^ constituted 
international tribunal." 

Basing his plea on these premises. Dr. 
Hill urges for an international conference 
of all responsible nations to reorganize 
the Society of Nations on this basis — a 
thing which obviously cannot be done 
by the present League of Nations, while 
organized "as a military and political 
alliance." 

•PERSING PREPARES SCIENCE 
MANUAL 

Ellis C. Persing, '11, of the Glenville 
High School of Cleveland, O., was chair- 
man of the committee appointed some 
time since to publish a. "Manual for 
Science in the Ninth Grade," and under 
his leadership a comprehensive manual 
has been published. It contains a care- 
ful],y worked -out statement of the pur- 
pose of the book, a clear exposition of 
methods and material, and a wealth of 
reference material for both students and 
teachers. It seems well adapted to ac- 
complish its purpose of outlining a 
course which shall acquaint the pupil with 
"the phenomena which come within his 
experience" and teach him "to "under 
stand scientific terms," "to use and un- 
derstand common scientific instruments," 
"to live better as an individual and as a 
member of a community," and "to open 
for him avenues of interest and profit" 
for the future. 

POFFENBERGER ON THE "MOVIES" 

In the April issue of "The Scientific 
Monthly" Dr. Albert T. Poffenbergcr. 
'09, Assistant Professor of Psychology 
at Columbia, has an article entitled "Mo- 
tion Pictures and Crime," an investiga- 
tion into the "eifects of motion picture 
experience on the mind of the young 
person." With the child he groups the 
mentally deficient adult. 



Dr. Poffenbergcr cites certain differ- 
ences in the mind of these two classes 
from the mind of the adult. These are : 
Suggestibility ; lack of ability to foresee 
and to weigh the consequences for self 
and others of different kinds of be- 
havior; the lack of capacity and will- 
ingness to exercise self-restraint ; an 
imagination less controlled and checked 
by reference to the realities. "All these 
traits taken together make the child and 
the mentally deficient person especially 
susceptible to evil influence." 

Upon these grounds Dr. Poffenberger 
demands a careful control of the pic- 
tures themselves and even more of the 
posters advertising them. He believes, 
however, that while preventive measures 
may come by legislation from outside, 
the real remedy can be most effectively 
applied from within the industry itself, 
and that the educational possibilities of 
the motion picture are limited only by 
the foresight of its leaders. 



NOTA BENE 

Alumni who will change their ad- 
dresses next Septem^ber are urged to 
send their new addresses to the 
Alumni office at once for correction 
during the summer. Plezise state date 
at which change will take place. 



Smith, '13, Inspires Young Folks 

The Rev. Henry G. Weston Smith, '13, 
who is pastor of the Greenville, Pa., 
Baptist Church, has been notably suc- 
cessful in interesting young people in 
religious work. From his membership 
of three hundred and eighty-four, so 
states a recent newspaper clipping,, he 
has sent five young people as students 
of various phases of religious activities. 
Among them is one Bucknellian, H. V. 
Thomas, '21, who, upon graduation from 
Bucknell, will enter Johns Hopkins to 
prepare for medical missionary work. 
1 ^ ■ 

Bucknell Colors at Curie Meeting 

Bucknell was represented at the big 
meeting held May 18th in Carnegie Hall, 
New York City, to honor Madame Curie, 
under the auspices of the American Uni- 
versity Women of the International 
Federation of University Women. The 
Orange and Blue floated from the box 
occupied by Miss Mildred B. Cathers, '10. 

The high point of the meeting was an 
address by President M. Carey Thomas, 
of Bryn Mawr, who urged women to re- 
main a separate gi-oup politically and 
under threat of revolution and over- 
throw, to force governments to disarm. 
. '■ — I ^ 1 

Kissell, '18, Leads Teachers 

Charles A. Kissell, '18, who is princi- 
pal of the Duncannou schools, has been 
nuide president of tbe Perry County 
Teachers' Association. Under his leader- 
ship a periodical has been established, 
"The Perry County School News," in 
which are printed reports from the vari- 
ous schools of the county and other 
news of interest to teachers. The first 
issue, nnder date of April, 1921, is well 
printed and edited. 



ALUMNI 

WHEN YOU RETURN FOR COM- 
MENCEMENT PLEASE CONGRATU- 
LATE LOCAL ADVERTISERS ON 
HAVING SEEN THEIR ADS. IN 
THE MONTHLY. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 




Bv Thomas Hart Benton Lewis, '58. 



As the value of reminiscences consists in show- 
ing the changes that have taken place within cer- 
tain limits of time and place, I shall relate only such 
matters as occur to me pertaining to my college life, 
leaving others to make comparisons. I prepared for 
college at Wyoming Seminary and entered the Uni- 
versity on the 19th of October, 1854. I came to 
Wilkes-Barre on the 16th, and at 11 o'clock in the 
evening, boarded the packet boat on the canal and 
sailed south under four horse power, that being the 
fastest means of travel in and out of Wilkes-Barre 
at that time, and after a pleasant and uneventful 
voyage, arrived at Danville early in the afternoon 
of the next day, where I took the train on the Cata- 
wissa Road to Milton. At Milton I discovered that 
a large part of the passengers were students. We 
were bundled into wagons of sundrj^ kinds and 
started on the home stretch, and arrived about dusk. 
The wagon I was in landed us at the West Wing. 
I began at once to hunt for a private room and 
board, which luckily I soon found at Mrs. Backus' 
on the corner of Third and St. George streets, 
where I remained during the entire four years. 
Of course I did not take any week end trips home, 
not taking even the short vacations. In the summer 
of 1856 the Lackawanna and Bloomsburg road was 
opened for traffic, and then I could come and go 
from Milton by rail, but it was not until my final 
trip home in July, 1858, that I was able to take the 
train at Montandon, and come through. There was 
no station, but a few planks laid down for a plat- 
form. 

The college buildings consisted of the West 
Wing of the Main building, devoted to students' 
rooms and dormitories, except the front corner room 
of each story, which were occupied by the Literary 
Societies, and the Society of Inquiry, and the Acad- 
emy building. All the functions of the college 
were carried on in the Academy building. The 
chapel was located on the third floor. The Pre- 
paratory School occupied a part of the second. 
The rest of the building was devoted to recita- 
tion rooms, the library and such other rooms 
as the college needed. The recitation rooms were 
furnished with plain wooden benches, which as the 
recitations in those days were all held in the fore- 
noon, became somewhat tiresome. The Female In- 
stitute occupied a building on the northerly side of 
Second street, nearly a block east of Market street. 
In 1856 the new building was erected on St. George 
street. 

There were no organized amusements in those 
days. The annual Juniors' Banquet and occasional 
receptions at the Institute were all the social func- 
tions had by the students. 

The boys sometimes played hand ball against 
the east end of the West Wing, which being a blank 
wall three stories high, served the purpose well. No 



other games were played that I recall. Some boys 
sought recreation, when the weather permitted, by 
tramping into the country and visiting neighboring 
towns. I remember once, two other boys and my- 
self, built a raft of some logs left on the bank by 
the spring freshet and floated down to near the ledge 
of rocks opposite Northumberland, and climbing 
up, visited the old leaning house, which some eccen- 
tric man had built on the very verge of the clifif, 
with the front side of the house leaning out about 
five feet, so that on looking out of the windows, one 
was directly over the water, looking down at it. It 
was not a very assuring situation, and we did not 
linger, and presently took up our long tramp home. 
Occasionally Dr. Malcom gave lectures in the Bap- 
tist Church, more for our entertainment than in- 
struction. I remember one on laughter, in the 
course of which he said that if one or two in a crowd 
would persist in laughing they would soon have the 
crowd laughing with them in sympathy. After the 
lecture was over and the people all out on the 
street, some of the boys concluded to experiment 
and find out if the Doctor knew what he was talk- 
ing about, and they soon found that he did, for they 
had the crowd laughing heartily in no time. " 

In the years 1855-6-7, the Commencements were 
held in the Grove immediately in front of the West 
Wing. The platform occupying the lower part of 
the grounds set apart for the purpose, and the seats 
were planks resting on timbers, extending up to- 
wards the building. The processions formed in 
front of the Academy and led by the band marched 
over to the grounds. In the spring of 1858, the con- 
struction of the middle part of the Main Building 
was commenced, and by Commencement time, the 
upper floor and the stairway leading to it were com- 
pleted, so that our class was the first one to be 
graduated in the present Commencement Hall, and 
Dr. Loomis was inaugurated president at the same 
time, as part of the proceedings. 

The sum total of the printing for Commencement 
purposes was the program printed on a three by five 
inch card (I still have a copy), yet we all made our 
speeches, received our diplomas, were elected mem- 
bers of the Alumni Association, ate our share of the 
dinner served in the basement of the Baptist Church. 
What a convenience that old church was ! All the 
meetings of the trustees, the curators, the alumni, 
and sundry other meetings pertaining to the college 
were held within its walls. 

Looking over my past life, my college years loom 
up among the happiest. My personal surroundings 
were pleasant, my classmates were genial, the pro- 
fessors were always painstaking and kind, and I 
revere their memory. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



About the Hill 



Faculty Honors Professors 

One of the finest events ever held at 
Bueknell was the dinner given at the 
Lewisburg Club on Tuesday evening, 
May 17, by the faculty of the University 
in honor of Professor William Emmet 
Martin. A.M., L.H.D., and Professor Wil- 
liam Cyrus Bartol, A.M., Ph.D., who have 
been attached to the faculty for forty 
and fifty years, respectively. 

Seldom has the club been decked in 
such gala attire as it vras on Tuesday 
evening. The huge Bueknell flag was 
hung at one end of the ballroom and 
an American flag at another, while gar- 
lands of pine and leaves were used for 
further decoration. The tables were ar- 
ranged in a hollow square, the toastmas- 
ter and speakers of the evening with 
their wives being seated at the head of 
the table. The color scheme of the 
tables was Orange and Blue candles. At 
each plate was laid a white carnation 
and bouquets of carnations were also to 
be found on the tables. 

The blessing was asked b.v the Rev. 
John T. Judd, Treasurer of the Uni- 
versity. Immediately following the bless- 
ing, Registrar Clark announced that two 
of the college women would come to 
every one present and secure their sig- 
nature on souvenir programs for Dr. 
Martin and Dr. Bartol. Music was fur- 
nished during the evening by an orches- 
tra composed of the Misses Kathryn 
Wagner, Eloise Hill, Esther Fleming and 
Mr. R. B. Stine. 

The toastmaster was President Emory 
W. Hunt, who introduced the speakers 
of the evening. Dean Phillips, Dr. Hamb- 
lin. Dr. Bartol and Dr. Martin. Loving 
tribute was paid to the life of Dr. Mar- 
tin and Dr. Bartol, both as to their pri- 
vate lives and their lives as professors 
in Bueknell University. Dr. Martin and 
Dr. Bartol responded in an admirable 
manner, telling, each in his own way, 
what elements had gone to make up their 
careers as professors. 

Tliose attending the banquet numbered 
close to one hundred persons, which in- 
cluded the faculty and trustees and their 
wives, and several guests. The commit- 
tee, of which Professor N. P. Davis was 
the chairman, worked untiringly to make 
the banquet a success and its efforts 
were not in vain. Bueknell University 
is indeed fortunate in having among its 
faculty men who have served for so 
many years. — ^BuckneHian. 



Professor Davis Honored 

The teaching staff and students of 
the Biology Department gathered at the 
home of Professor N. F. Davis, May 12, 
to give him a surprise party in honor 
of liis twenty-fifth anniversary as a 
member of the Bueknell facult,y. A din- 
ner and a clever evening entertainment, 
prepared by Mrs. Davis and Professor N. 
H. Stewart, served to deliglit the guests. 



HiU and Burg 

Mrs. William G. Pohlman, formerly 
Flora Sigel, ex- '98, has been visiting 
Professor and Mrs. M. L. Drum. 

Emily Lane, '10, who is connected with 
a teachers' agency at Pittsburgh, visited 
the Women's College recentlj'. 

Miss Edith Schillinger, formerly in 
charge of dramatics at the Women's 
College, at present in welfare work at 
Trenton, N. J., visited friends at the 
hill and in town during May. 

Mrs. Harry Weaver, formerly Dora 
Hamler, '14, of Pittsburgh, who has been 
visiting her mother here, gave a delight- 
ful recital at the Presbyterian Church 
recently. Mr. Weaver was in town over 
Memorial Day. 

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert C. Grice, ('18 
and Music '19), spent some weeks re- 
cently with Mrs. Griee's parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. George H. Fisher. 

Ralph Belford, '04, was in town May 4. 

The Y. M. C. A. elections for officers 
for next year resulted as follows : Presi- 
dent, Herbert Haslam, '23, of Palmerton, 
Pa.; Vice President, Preston Bechtel, 
'22, of Reading; Secretary, Samuel Rick- 
ard, '2.3, of Philadelphia ; Treasurer, 
Finley Keech, '22, of Netcong, N. J. 

President Hunt delivered the opening 
address at the Pennsylvania and New 
Jersey College Y. M. C. A. convention 
at Penn State, May 21. 

Theta Alpha Phi national dramatic 
fraternity entertained May 11. 

Professor J. W. Rice and his as- 
sistants completed a three-day bac- 
teriological survey of White Deer creek 
during May. 

The combined musical clubs of the 
university gave a delightful concert in 
Commencement Hall May 9. 

Raymond D. Tice, '19, of Jefferson 
Medical College, and Mrs. Tice visited 
Mrs. Tiee's parents, Mr. and Mrs. G. C. 
Ruhl, in May. 

Alden P. King, ex-'21, of Jefferson, 
was in town May 16. 

The May Day "Festival on the Women's 
College campus fully realized the hopes 
placed on it. The pageant presented 
this year was the work of Miss Emily 
Dovine of the junior class. The May 
Queen was Miss Martha Leiser, of Lew- 
isburg, who lived up to the best tradi- 
tions of this honored role. 

The sophomores defeated the fresh- 
men in tlie annual baseball game May 
27, 17 to 3. 

The 1922 L'Agenda appeared at the 
hill May 30, and has since been receiv- 
ing the xiraises of all observers. 

Leonard Wlieat, of Millville, N. J., has 
been elected Editor-in-Chief of next 
year's L'Agenda, and Samuel Rickard, 
of Philadelphia, Business Manager. 



These Folks Will Be Here 

The alumni who have alreadj- (June 
.3) replied favorably to the invitation of 
the universitj' to be here for Commence- 
ment are: 

Oliver J. Decker and wife, '99. 
Maurice B. Cooke and wife, '16, 
W. E. Williams, wife and son, '89. 

Clinton I. Sprout, '17, and wife, '18. 
Mrs. J. R. Wood, and boy, '94. 
J. A. Villalon, wife and boy, '11. 
Howard Griffith and wife, '07. 

James W. Lowry and wife, '19. 

William E. Stahl, wife, '87. 

A. R. Garner, wife, '99. 

Ezra Allen and wife, '95. 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert J. Hamlin. '15. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Schnure, '15. 

Dr. and Mrs. H. N. Cole, '06. 

8. Elsie Bentz, '01. 

Mrs. M. B. Cook, '16. 

Anne W. Galbraith, '07. 

Mary Galbraith Hart, '07. 

Nellylou Gardner, '17. 

Marion Brown Hj'att, '85. 

Kathryn Johnson, '20. 

Marjorie E. Kostenbader, '19. 

Dora Raymond Schuler, '11. 

Anna Sterling, '20. 

Mrs. Joseph S. Reitz, '99. 

Mrs. D. J. Williams, '66. 

Isabelle B. Wolfe. 

Mrs. Blanche Stoner Wood, '05 

Emma T. Zelley, '71. 

Mrs. Mary Kimble. 

Marion R. Bancroft, '16. 

Helen M. Walton, '20. 

Mrs. Victor Clare, '19. 

Mary L. Jones, '16. 

Yerna Whitaker, '11. 

Helen M. Groff, '16. 

Hazel M. Gay, '18. 

Marguerite Quigley, '16 

Florence Rollins 

Jessie I. Potts, '18. 

Edith Gardner, '20. 

Mrs. Walter Scott. 

Flora M. Clymer, '93. 

Mrs. Evelyn M. Hoblitzell, '18. 

Adda Hayman, '20, and sister. 

J. W. Grier, Jr., '09. 

Frank Hollingshead, '97. 

James R. Herman, '19. 

George M. Righter, '72. 

R. G. Bostwick, '05. 

Sylvester B. Duiilap, '03. 

William E. Thompson, '01. 

Remain C. Hassrick, '06. 

Harold D. Germer, '19. 

Walter A. Harm, '19. 

Peter B. Cregar, '95. 

G. L. Freudenberger, '01. 

W. W. Pangburn, '10. 

Tliomas Wood, '05. 

H. S. Lloyd, '11. 

P. W. Boggess, '17. 

C. Walter Lotte, '14. 

Paul C. Snvder, '11. 

Harrv R. Warfel, '20. 

H. L. Nancarrow, '20. 

James M. Paterson, '92. 

(Continued on page 12) 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 




BRITISH OFFICER PRAISES 
GENERAL BLISS 

Captain Peter E. Wriglit, of the British 
Army, a member of the British Peace 
Commission, in his recent book entitled 
"At the Supreme War Council," says of 
General Tasker H. Bliss : 

"General Bliss was not quite on the 
same level as the other members," he 
writes, "for Bliss had not yet got his 
army. He had the good will, the indus- 
try, the sagacity, the massive bulk and 
slow movement of an elephant. He 
brought to the alliance, where the mem- 
bers of every interallied team all pulled 
different ways, what it needed most, 
rigid impartiality, even toward its own 
Government. Once he made up his mind 
he was immovable. Even Foeh dashed 
at him in vain. There was something 
very fine about his character, as there 
was about all American leaders, like 
Pershing and Sims and their subordi- 
nates, who came to Versailles ; they 
seemed determined to make their dis- 
interestedness cancel their inexperience. 
They were all quite untouched by the 
taint of personal calculation that seems 
to load the air where the great are. The 
New World not only came to redress the 
balance of the Old, but to set it an ex- 
ample." 

GENERAL BLISS APPEALS TO 
CHURCHMEN 

That the responsibility for the next 
war will rest squarely upon the shoulders 
of the church people of the United States 
is the position taken by General Tasker 
H. Bliss, ex-'7.3, in a letter sent recently 
to the Church Peace Union. In the let- 
ter he says: 

"I would not take a single step in the 
way of disarmament except as the result 
of an agreement, thoroughly acceptable 
to us, between ourselves and the other 
principal nations engaged in the arma- 
ment rivalry. I have not the faintest 
idea of what form that first agreement 
might take. I have, therefore, no scheme 
of disarmament to propose. My sole 
purpose is to have such an international 
conference. Either there is no practical 
common sense among the people of the 
United States or else they now know 
the essential facts that point to the ne- 
cessity of such a conference. 

"If the churches cannot agree upon 
that, it will not be done, nor will it be 
done until the good God puts into them 
the proper spirit of their religion. The 
responsibility is entirely upon the pro- 
fessing Christians of the United States. 
If another war like the last one should 
come, the}' will be responsible for every 
drop of blood that will be shed and for 
every dollar wastefully expended." 

As a result of his appeal four of the 
lai'gest religious organizations in the 
country — the Federal Council of 
Churches, the National Catholic Welfare 
Council, the Central Conference of 
America, and the United Synagogues of 
America, issued a nation-wide appeal for 
an international conference on disarma- 
ment, and urged more than one hundred 
thousand clergymen attached to their 
organizations to read the appeal June 5th 
in their churches. 



MURDOCK, EX-'04, DENOUNCES 
"SLACKER LIST" 

Maj. William G. Murdock, ex-'04, who 
was chief draft officer for Pennsylvania 
during the war, and who is now State 
Adjutant of the American Legion for 
Pennsylvania, has been leading the pro- 
test against the publication of the War 
Department's "slacker lists," basing his 
remonstrance on the inaccuracy of the 
lists. 

Major Murdock says: "I hold no brief 
for slackers, and I am perfectly satisfied 
that any one who evaded service should 
have his name published. But it is cer- 
tainly not right, fair nor just that men 
who volunteered, fought, bled, and in 
some cases died, should have their names 
published as slackers. 

"The real slackers in the present in- 
stance are the Government officials, who 
are trying to make a desk job out of 
the compilation of the slacker list. They 
should get out in the field and investi- 
gate the cases, and then the list would 
be about as near authentic as possible. 
The present method is wrong and is an 
outrage and disgrace to the men who 
served in the war." 

The New York Times comments edi- 
torially on his position: "Major Mur- 
dock's indictment is of a system of 
clerical work that stopped short of per- 
sonal investigation before the publica- 
tion in Instalments of the deserter rec- 
ord. * * * It is plainly the opinion 
of the man on the street that every 
drafted man listed as delinquent should 
be looked up, or that inquiries should 
be made about him by somebody as- 
signed to the work. If this method had 
been followed, Secretary Weeks would 
have had to make few apologies to vet- 
erans whose names were published." 

The Ledger supports him editorially as 
follows: "If there were no other way 
of ascertaining whether the names on 
that list properly belong there, there 
might be reason in asking their publica- 
tion; but this is not the case. And it 
is to cloud the issue to contend that op- 
position against the unjust branding of 
innocent men as slackers and deserters 
amounts to an effort to shield the guilty. 
By all means drag into the light and 
brand with infinite shame the skulking 
cowards; but that act of justice ought 
not to be performed at the expense and 
peril of the loyal and the brave." 



a growing departure from the principle 
of local self-government, and the in- 
roads made by our Nation and State 
upon the field which properly belongs 
to our local government. The departure 
began with one great war, and has ad- 
vanced with great strides during the 
one through which we have just passed. 
Some of the drift has taken permanent 
form in amendments to our Constitution. 
"At one time we were jealous of our 
right to govern ourselves. To-day we 
seem to be unwilling to take the trouble 
to do it." 

DR. GRESS WILL AID AMATEUR 
BOTANISTS 

A recent Harrisburg dispatch explains 
a new service which State Botanist E. 
M. Gress, '07, will undertake for the 
botanists of Pennsylvania: 

Services of the state botanist will be 
offered for the identification of Penn- 
sylvania plants collected by amateur 
botanists, Secretary Pi-ed Hasmussen, of 
the Depaxtment of Agriculture, an- 
nounced recently. It is believed that the 
services of the state botanist may be 
valuable to the school teachers and chil- 
dren in the public schools of the state 
in identifying strange plants found by 
classes studying botany. 

Dr. E. M. Gress, who holds the office 
of state botanist, has collected more 
than 10,000 plants of Pennsylvania for 
the state herbarium. These plants will 
be mounted and identified. Any speci- 
mens forwarded to the state botanist 
vrill be identified without cost to the 
sender. 



JUDGE DICKINSON ON LOCAL 
GOVERNMENT 

Judge O. B. Dickinson, ex-'77, in an 
address delivered May 1 before the Bap- 
tist Ministers' Conference at Philadel- 
phia, called attention to the growing 
trend toward centralization in govern- 
ment and the growing disinclination of 
the people to govern themselves. He said 
in paa't: 

"My special theme is a warning against 
the lessening of our devotion to this 
idea of local self-government, and for 
restricting our National and State ac- 
tivities to their proper field. Please do 
not regard it as a mere abstraction. It 
is the most practical of all our ideas of 
government. Most of us have noticed 



DR. PONTIUS WINS MASONIC 
HONORS 

Dr. Paul J. Pontius, of Philadelphia, 
an eye specialist at Wills Eye Hospital, 
was elected Grand Junior Warden of the 
Knights Templar of Pennsylvania at 
the recent conclave held in that city. 

Dr. Pontius is one of the very few 
thirty-third degree Masons in Philadel- 
phia. The installment into his new office 
was held with elaborate ceremonial 
May 25. 

YOUNG, '03, HONORED BY SUPER- 
INTENDENTS 

John A. Young, '03, has been honored 
by the Connecticut State Superintend- 
ents' Association by being made its presi- 
dent for the coming year. Mr. Young 
has previously served two years as secre- 
tary-treasurer of the organization. 



Gold Discovers Potash 

Jolin S. Gold, '18, an instructor in 
mathematics at the university, is enjoy- 
ing considerable newspaper celebrity for 
having made a discovery of potash near 
Towanda some time since. While hunt- 
ing rock specimens last fall, he discov- 
ered what seemed to him pure potash. 
Subsequent investigation by experts con- 
firmed his surmise, and now the Brad- 
ford eountians are building air castles 
with the hoped-for returns on this de- 
posit. Mr. Gold has not yet announced 
what percentage he will claim as a 
royalty. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



Personals 




THE TWENTY-FIVE YEAR CLASS 

Are you in this picture? If you are, it's time to be looking up train connections for Lewisburg. The date is June 11-15, 
and the occasion the Seventy-fifth Anniversary of the founding of the University, and the quarter-century anniversary 
of your class. 



1858 
Mrs. Annie Linn Angle, Inst., '58, re- 
sides at 957 South Burlington Avenue, 
Los Angeles, California. 

1860 

Mrs. J. M. Thomas, Inst., '60, is now 
living at 415 Virginia Avenue, South, 
Eoanoke, Virginia. 

1863 

Dr. Owen P. Eaches has removed to 
Chocorna, New Hampshire. 

1868 

Mrs. Fannie R. Marsh, Inst., may be 
addressed at "The Home," Fifth and 
Muench Streets, Harrishurg, Pa. She is 
anxious for news of the members of her 
class. 

Mrs. Sarah Shivers Murray resides at 
227 King's Highway, East Haddonfield, 
N. J. 

Mrs. Mary Ehoads Jacobs lives at 
Cherry Stone Lodge, Lansdale, Pa. 

1872 
The Rev. Dr. Albert Foster has re- 
tired from active pastoral work and 
lives at 123 Lark Street, Albany, N. Y. 
He is enjoying fine health and plans to 
he at the fiftieth anniversary reunion of 
his class. 

1887 

Stephen E. Kieflfer, ex-'87, resides at 
78 The Uplands, Claremont, Berkeley, 
California. 



1888 
E. T. Derr, ex-'88, is located at 5303 
Alaska Street, Seattle, Wash. 

1889 

Mrs. Charles A. Campbell, Inst., for- 
merly Carrie Lovell, is the wife of the 
pastor of the First Presbyterian Church 
of Elizabeth, N. J. Mr. and Mrs. Camp- 
bell reside at 833 Salem Road, Elizabeth. 
1892 

Dr. A. R. E. Wj'ant has been in Chi- 
cago since he matriculated as the two 
hundred and seventh student in the Uni- 
versity of Chicago in 1892, and now has 
a daughter in the University Law School. 
He has built up a good medical practice 
in a fine residential section of the city, 
is Vice-President of the Chicago Dra- 
matic Society, and active in Y. M. C. A. 
Americanization work. 
1893 

Mrs. Frank M. Hubbard, nee Oriana 
Williams, of the Institute, is at present 
in Council, Idaho, where she is County 
Superintendent of Schools. 

1894 

Adam M. Wyant, ex-'94, is given a 
full-page write-up in the March Univer- 
sity of Chicago Magazine, as the first 
XT.' of C. alumnus and "C" man to be 
elected to Congress. 

1895 

Dr. G. C. L. Eiemer, of the State De- 
partment of Public Instruction, was a 
visitor at the hill, April 19. 



William T. Paullin may be addressed 
at 9 Hitchcock Hall, University of Chi- 
cago, where he is engaged in accounting. 

1897 

Dr. A. O. Miller is a physician in Beed 
City, Mich. 

1898 

Frank W. Dillon was recently made 
an honorary member of the Kansas 
chapter of Sigma Delta Chi, a profes- 
sional journalism fraternity. 

Mrs. William Pohlmau, formerly Flora 
Sigel, ex-'98, of Honolulu, Hawaii, vis- 
ited Professor and Mrs. M. L. Drum dur- 
ing May. 

1900 

Rush Kress is enjoying a Mediter- 
ranean trip. 

The Rev. A. W. Anderson is pastor 
of the First Baptist Church of Easton, 
Pa., residing at 709 Ferry Street. 

L. J. Shumaker, ex-'OO, is President 
of the American Pretzel Co., and Vice- 
President of the Crane Ice Cream Co., 
with offices at 1326 Widener Building, 
Philadelphia. 

The Rev. A. W. Anderson, ex-'OO, pas- 
tor of the First Baptist Church of Eas- 
ton, Pa., has made a translation of Urial 
Serveters from the French to the Eng- 
lish. He has also had published "The 
Science and Mystery of Masonry." Chap- 
lin of U. S. W. V. ' 

1901 

Representative Charles F. Bidelspach- 
er of Williarasport, recentlj- introduced 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 




a bill providing for the eouiity poor dis- 
tricts for counties of the siitli class. 

Tlie Bev. Frank Anderson, superin- 
tendent of District 17, of the New York 
S. S. Association, has been selected by 
the International S. S. Association as 
one of the Instructors in the Summer 
Training School at Winnepesaukee, N. 
H. A two-weeks session will be held 
the first part of August and Mr. An- 
derson will teach the adult department. 
This is a distinct recognition of his 
ability as a Sunday School leader. 

1902 

Lewis E. Theiss, of Muney, gave an 
interesting talk on the early history of 
Lewisburg, before the Rotary Club of 
Lewisburg, April 14. 

Thomas L. Sherbondy is a manufac- 
turer of Saratoga, chips, in Des Moines. 
His address is 2024 Cottage Grove Ave- 
nue. 

1903 

Frank Adams Mitchell is Vice-Presi- 
dent of the Ceresit Waterprooting Co., 
Westminster Building, Chicago. 

R. E. Carringer, ex-'03, is Supervisor of 
Rates at Lester, Pa. 

1904 

Mr. and Mrs. James Elliott, Jr., (Irene 
Barton), of 343 Cliff Avenue, Pelham, 
N. Y., are receiving congratulations on 
the birth of a daughter, Janet Louise 
Elliott, April 4, 1921. 

1905 

"Stren" MeCormick, '0.5, and "Westie" 
West, '17, took dinner with "Scrappy" 
Schroyer, '10, at Wilmington recently. 

Robert B. Mackey, M.D., who prac- 
ticed at Clark's Summit, Pa., before serv- 
ing in the U. S. Medical Corps, is now 
living at 1630 Mt. Vernon Street, Phila- 
delphia, and taking graduate work in 
eye, ear, nose and throat, at the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania. 

The Rev. John C. Sanders, of Turbot- 
ville, has been named stated clerk of 
the Wyoming Classis of the Reformed 
Church. 

Paul G. Smith, '05, dissolved on April 
first, the law partnership existing with 
Frank P. Snodgi'ass, and will continue 
the practice formerly conducted by them 
at offices removed to .504-505-506 Frank- 
lin Building, Harrisburg, Pa. 

William L. Dentler, ex-'05, is located 
at 1732 Brighton Road, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

1906 

Mrs. Joseph Smith, formerly Eliza- 
beth Barber, Music, '06, may be reached 
at her home in Stockton, N. J. Mrs. 
Smith is a graduate nurse from Hahne- 
mann Hospital, Philadelphia. 

Mrs. Ivan L. Wright, nee Florence 
Cobb, is living at 246 West Seventy-sixth 
Street, New York City. Her husband is 
with the Equitable Life Insurance Co. 

Frederick V. Follmer is to represent the 
Milton Rotary Club at the International 
Convention of Rotarians at Edinburgh 
in June. 



Beinhold Stolz, ex-'06, spent a few 
ilays in Lewisburg the latter part of 
April. 

Tlie every-niember-canvass of the First 
Baptist Church, of Philadelphia, is un- 
der the direction of Remain C. Hassrick, 
who organized the New World Move- 
ment campaign in this church last year. 

B. Jack Gardner recently sustained a 
broken jaw when the limb of a. tree 
fell on him, nearly crushing out his life. 
After several weeks in the Hahnemann 
Hospital at Scranton, he is now at home 
and well on the way to recovery. 

Edith A. Bailey, ex-'06, is teaching at 
Wilson College, Chambersburg, Pa. 

1907 

Mrs. George Burette Snider, (Ada El- 
len Moore, Inst.,) is living in Farming- 
ton, Mo. 

H. H. Adams is located at Ranger, 
Texas, engaged in oil operations. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jonathan Wolfe, (Jose- 
phine Hankins, '09), maj' now be found 
at 7700 Cregier Avenue, Chicago, 111. "J" 
is Assistant Superintendent of Track and 
Roadway, Chicago Surface Lines. 

Gilbert S. Perez has left for Manila 
after a visit in the States since January 
of this year. He may be addressed in 
care of the Board of Education, Phil- 
ippine Islands. 

W. W. Staver is principal of Public 
School No. 5. His address is Hudson 
Avenue and Tenth Street, West New 
York, N. J. 

L. O. Manley was recently made on 
examination an Associate of the Amer- 
ican Institute of Accountants. 

William C. Hulley, Sr., is associated 
with the Dormont Bank, Pittsburgh. His 
address is 1518 Fallowfield Avenue. 

1908 

E. Carroll Condict sailed April 30 
from New York on his return to Burma. 
His address from that time on will be 
A. B. Chin Mission, Thayetungo, Burma, 
India. The best wishes of Bucknellians 
go with Condict as he resumes his work. 

Mrs. Blanche Culbertson, formerly 
Blanche Baer, ex-'08, resides at the cor- 
ner of Bennett and Cole Avenues, Brad- 
ford, Pa. 

Mrs. Carol Spratt Foster, Inst., resides 
at 8S St. Louis Place, Atlanta, Ga. 

1909 

Mrs. F. G. Rea (nee Ida Williams) 
and her husband are the new owners of 
the Imperial Hotel at Reynoldsville, Pa. 
Mrs. Rea is giving much of her time to 
short-storj' writing. 

Milton S. Hallman, who received his 
Master of Arts degree at Columbia in 
1917, is acting President in charge of 
the Summer Session of the State Normal 
at Spearfish, S. T>., second largest in the 
state. 

Eugene L. Martin, ex-'09, is a bond 
salesman in Carlisle, Pa. He resides in 
the Pomfret Apartments. 



1910 

William J. Schultz is pastor of the 
Lutheran Church, at Nittany, Pa. 

Alma A. Ringler, ex-'lO, is an employe 
in the War Department, and resides at' 
40 New York Avenue, N. W., Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

Raymond Eastwood has recently been 
placed in charge of the Philadelphia 
offices of a large brokerage house. 

Frank M. Jenner is principal of School 
17, Rochester, N. Y. 

The Rev. J. Earl Edwards, who is 
Superintendent of Promotion for the 
New Jersey Baptist Convention, resides 
at o2 Berkeley Place, Bloomfield, N. J., 
and has offices in Newai-k. 

Viola E. Wilhelm is now residing at 
146 Cleveland Street, Orange, N. J. 

Paul Noftsker, ex-'lO, was a Lewisburg 
visitor during April. 

Samuel D. Cochran is teaching Biology 
in the Yonkers High School. He resides 
at Croton-on-Hudson. 

The Rev. George C. Fetter is pastor of 
the Ottawa, 111., First Baptist Church. 

Harry Caum Haines, ex-'lO, of Somer- 
ton, N. J., and wife, formerly Dana 
Bower, '08, lost their youngest child by 
death recently. Mr. Haines is promi- 
nently connected with the agricultural 
work of the State of New Jersey. 

1911 

Richard G. Champion, ex-'ll, can be 
reached at 64 University Road, Brook- 
line, Mass. He is a motor truck sales- 
man. 

John W. Trauger is manager of the 
Ideal Cand,y Co., Inc., Johnson Cit.y, N. 
Y. His address is 41 Vine Street, Bing- 
hamton, N. Y. 

Katherine Bronson Fowler now resides 
at Williamsville, N. Y. 

John V. Leighou, ex-'ll, is engaged in 
forestry at Custer, S. D., and may be ad- 
dressed in care of the Forest Service, 
Custer. 

Florence E. Dyer is statistician for 
the Pennsylvania State Tuberculosis 
Commission. Her address is 223 Reily 
Street, Harrisburg. 

R. D. Sisson is now in the advertising 
department of the Oliver Typewriter 
Co., at 159 North Dearborn Street, Chi- 
cago. 

1912 

Harrison S. Sweet may be addressed 
at 21/2 Van Vorst Street, Utica, N. Y. 
He is Engineer of Equipment for the 
New York Street Railways System, 
which comprises Rochester, Syracuse and 
Utica. His business address is Syracuse. 

Lewis P. Robinson is with Robinson 
& Welch, of New Y'ork City. He may 
be addressed at 51 West Forty-eighth 
Street. 

Samuel Blair, Jr., ex-'12, may be ad- 
dressed at 6222 Wayne Avenue, Chicago. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



Personals 



1913 

S. K. "White, who for several years 

has practiced law in Philadelphia, has 

recently associated himself with the 

firm of Eawle & Henderson, with offices 

' in the West End Trust Building. 

Leonard Richardson is now located at 
Knoxville, Tenn., as state livestock 
specialist. 

Lieut. Hugh M. BuUard has changed 
his address to 2626 Woodley Place, N. 
W., Washington, D. C. 

"Al" Jordan, who has been for some 
time at Saranac Lake, is having a hard 
fight with tuberculosis which was in- 
curred while playing football at Buck- 
nell. All Bucknellians are wishing him 
luck. 

Dr. F. C. Eshelman is now living at 
2533 S. Sixty-first Street, Philadelphia, 
and taiing graduate work in eye, nose 
and throat, at Polyclinic Hospital and 
the University of Pennsylvania. 

"The Southern Workman," published 
at Hampton Institute, contains in its 
March issue a well-written and well- 
illustrated article entitled, "The Negro 
Institutional Church," which praises very 
highly the work of Richard H. Bowling, 
Jr., in his pastorate at the First Baptist 
Church of Norfolk. 

Leonard A. Richardson is Specialist in 
Animal Husbandry. He has been con- 
nected with the University of Tennes- 
see Extension Courses since February, 
1919. 

William C. Hulley, Jr., is teaching 
school in Pittsburgh. He may be reached 
at 108 Merrit Street, Carrick. 

Rev. George Middleton is pastor of 
the Calvary Church of Syracuse, N. Y. 

1914 

Frances McNall is at present residing 
at 16 Evarts Street, N. E., Washington, 
D. C. 

Donald A. Sorout is an illustrator, re- 
siding at 1507 Arch Street, Philadelphia. 

1915 

M. M. Walter is director of the De- 
partment of Vocational Training in the 
Coatesville Public Schools. 

Joseph W. Aleshouckas has removed 
recently to 209 McDaniel Street, Day- 
ton, Ohio. 

The Rev. Harold S. Myatt has recent- 
ly been called to the pastorate of the 
Parkerford Baptist Church, and is now 
happy in his work in this place. 

Josiah J. Markle, ex-'15, resides at 430 
South Grant Avenue, Wilmington, Del. 

Milton C. Embrey is practicing osteo- 
pathy at 218 Shiloh Street, Pittsburgh. 

1916 

William L. Showers is teaching at 
Painesville, Ohio. He resides at 528 
South St. Clair Street. 

William E. Cowan, ex-'16, may be 
found at 161 Falls Avenue, Youngstown, 
O. He is Assistant Purchasing Agent 
for the Youngstown Sheet and Tube Co. 

Roscoe G. Davis is Assistant Super- 
visor, Pennsylvania Railroad, at Sun- 
bury, Pa. The Millner Building is his 
present address. 



Warren F. Brooke is pastor of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church at Spring 
City. He has been located there since 
April first. 

K. M. Persing is at the Glenville High 
School, Cleveland, O. 

Russell W. Everett is with the Al- 
burger Pump and Condenser Co., of New 
York, as assistant to the Mechanical En- 
gineer. 

1917 

Forest Gibson Walter, Music, '17, is a 
violinist in Williamsport. 

Constantino Nagro, Music, '17, is an 
instructor in violin at Albright College. 

Henry T. Lofft is located at Room 
255, B. & O. Building, Wheeling, W. Va. 

Nellylou Gardner is dean of Linden 
Hall Seminary, at Lititz. 

Dr. Edward R. McNutt is practicing 
medicine at Leechburg, Pa. 

Clinton I. Sprout visited the hill 
March 21. 

Vera Couch is teaching in the Junior 
High School in Johnstown, Pa. Her ad- 
dress is 66 Cooper Avenue. 

Clarence R. Weber is connected with 
the Oklahoma Producing and Refining 
Corporation of America, at Tulsa, Okla. 
The past year he has been employed as 
Field Paymaster, but has recently taken 
the post of Auditor. 

Eugene P. Bertin is Professor of Eng- 
lish in the Williamsport High School. 

1918 

Elizabeth B. Champion is an instruc- 
tor in the Engineering Extension Divi- 
sion of State College. She lives at 112 
Miles Street. 

Gwendolyn L. Hanna, ex-'lS, is teach- 
ing Domestic Science at Erie, Pa. Her 
address is 226 West Twenty-first Street. 

David Boswell, who graduated from 
Rochester Seminary this spring, has 
been made an assistant to Mr. C. A. 
Brook in the Home Missions Depart- 
ment of the Northern Baptist Conven- 
tion. He will take special work in sur- 
vey and graphs at the New York School 
of Philanthropy in preparation. His 
chief work will probably be in connec- 
tion with the Baptist Community House. 

Maiy B. Beatty, who is at present 
taking a course in the University of 
California Summer School, has been ap- 
pointed a member of the committee in 
charge of the revision of the course of 
study for the high schools of Nevada. 
She will return to Lovelocks, Colorado, 
next year, with an increase of salary. 

1919 

Lloyd Loy Garner is living at 702 
Cherokee Avenue, Bai-tlesville, Okla. He 
is Foreman in the Gas Pipe Line Depart- 
ment of the Empire Gas and Fuel Co. 

Ernest R. Sender is Refinery and Com- 
bustion Engineer with the Empire Re- 
fineries, Inc., Box 2067, Tulsa, Okla. 

Mary Mills McLeod, ex-'19 is living at 
21 East Fifty-fifth Street Terrace, 
Kansas City. Mo. She is teaching Home 
Economics. 



Gladys Esther Stanton, ex-'19, is teach- 
ing English in the High School at Deep 
River, Conn. 

Arthur B. Gandy, ex-'19, is Salesman 
for Armour & Co., at 1910 Green Street, 
Philadelphia. 

Frederick Dufifee, ex-'19, is in the Ex- 
port Department of the Oil Well Supply 
Co. He lives at 939 Berkshire Avenue, 
Pittsburgh. 

Charles Edward Wainwright, ex-'19, is 
engaged in Government work in the De- 
partment of Justice at Vienna, Virginia. 

Miles Walker Smith, ex-'19, lives at 
43 Penn Street, Indiana, Pa. He is do- 
ing surveying. 

1920 

George W. Lees visited Lewisburg 
friends the first week in May. 

Nelson Chance was in town the week- 
end of April 30. He had just returned 
from Cuba with the expectation of stay- 
ing in the States for some time. 

John Bauman is a mechanical engi- 
neer in the employ of the Standon Steel 
Car Co., at Homewood. His address is 
812 South Avenue, Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

Charles Freeble, ex-'20, is living at 
1200 Race Street, Connellsville, Pa. He 
is employed as Mining Engineer with 
the H. C. P. 0. Co. 

Anna Sterling spent the week-end of 
May 1st renewing old friendships in 
Lewisburg. 

Helen Bodine, ex-'20, has a clerical 
position with the Bell Telephone Co. in 
Philadelphia. Resides at Thirty-fifth and 
Powelton Avenue. 

Charles Iredell is a chemist in the 
employ of the Great Western Sugar Co., 
and may be reached at 44 Clayton Street, 
Brush, Colorado. 

Agnes Hoffman is teaching in Cynwyd, 
Pa. 

Florence M. Gable, ex-'20, is teaching 
at Sharon Hill, Pa. 

Manuel Suros, ex-'20, may be reached 
at 47 East Villuendas, Manzanilla, Cuba. 
He is employed there as the administra- 
tor of a sugar plantation. 

Morgan Beech is a medical student at 
Philadelphia. 

"Sid" Peale has bought a hotel in 
Eagles Mere which he will open to the 
public in June. 

Julius Seebach will teach in Rochester 
the coming year. 

D. K. Botts goes to the University of 
Dijon for next year. 

Roy Snyder, ex-'20, is a student at the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

Frank Ingram, of 4516 Walnut Street, 
Philadelphia, is a student at the Jeffer- 
son Medical College. 

H. L. Nancarrow has just received the 
appointment to a three-year special ap- 
prentice course for officers' training. He 
dropped in at the "Hill" April 9th. 

E. H. Derb.v is city editor of the 
■ Greensburg Daily Tribune. 

Thyrza Bromley is teaching at Bes- 
sie Tift College, Forsyth, Ga. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 




George Gaskill is a student at the 
Crozer Theological Seminarj', Chester, 
Pa. 

James Bierly, ex-'20, is a student at 
the University of Pennsylvania. His ad- 
dress is 3800 Locust Street, Philadelphia. 

Huston LeClair, ex-'20, is engaged in 
the coal and coke business. 

Anthony Amerise, ex-'20, is a student 
at the Jefferson Medical College in Phil- 
adelijhia. He lives at 11.35 Spruce Street. 

LaVerne Shea is Safety Supervisor of 
the Lycoming nlant of. the U. S. Rubber 
Co. He lives at 819 Louisa Street, Wil- 
liamsport. Pa. 

Edith Larson, ex'20, of 191 Mansfield 
Street, New Haven, Conn., is teacher of 
Domestic Science in the New Haven 
Schools. 

Kathryn Slifer, ex-'20, is completing 
her work and getting her degree at Ean- 
dolph-Maeon Woman's College this 
Spring. 

Dewitt K. Botts will sail this summer 
for France, where he will take up work 
at the University of Dijon. 



Deaths 

CLARA WILSON BROWN, INST., '99 

Word has just been received of the 
death, Feb. 14, 1921, of Clara Wilson 
Brown, of the class of 1899, Institute, 
at her home at Rochester, Pa. 

WILLIAM AYRESMAN SHIPMAN, '86 

William Ayresman Shipman, of the 
class of 1886, died suddenly at his resi- 
dence in Sunbury on May 12. 

For years Mr. Shipman had been an 
esteemed citizen of Sunbury and a. lo.yal 
Bueknellian. Three of his sons are Buck- 
nell men, Russell Conwell Shipman, '15; 
Harley Nevin Shipman, '17, and Wil- 
liam Ayresman Shipman, Jr., '23. 

Funeral services were conducted by 
Dr. T. Carson Hanna, '95, pastor of the 
First Baptist Church of Sunbury, who 
paid a tribute to the exemplary life and 
high character of Mr. Shipman. 

GEORGE R. SPRATT, '60 

Dr. George R. Spratt, of the class of 
1860, died at his home in Coatesville, 
May 22, in his eighty-third year. The 
body was brought to Lewisburg for in- 
terment in the family lot. A brief serv- 
ice was held at the grave by Dr. Leroy 
Stephens, '68. 

Dr. Spratt was a son of Dr. George 
Main Spratt, formerl.y secretary of the 
Pennsylvania Baptist Education So- 
ciety, and father of Mrs. Lincoln Hul- 
ley. He was a loyal Bueknellian, hav- 
ing attended under guidance of his son. 
Dr. George A. Spratt, the sixtieth re- 
union of his class last June. 

DR. WILLIAM D. ROBERTS 

The Rev. Dr. William D. Roberts, ac- 
tive in the Presbyterian Churches of 
Pennsj'Ivania for years, and known to 
many Bueknellians as the father of 
Grace Roberts Perrine, '03, died sudden- 
ly at his home in Philadelphia, May 5. 



REV. ELMER E. HALL, '96 

The Rev. Elmer E. Hall, of Cedar- 
ville, N. J., died at that place May 4, 
after an illness of several months. Alter 
graduation from Bueknell and Crozer, 
Mr. Hall went into the ministry, holding 
several pastorates. He had been pastor 
of the Cedarville Baptist Church until 
recently, when he resigned to take up 
public school work. 

MARY COX OBERLIN, INST., '63 

Mrs. J. S. Oberlin, formerly Mary C. 
Cox, died November 13, 1918, according 
to information just received by the 
Alumni Office. 

BRUCE L. BANKS, EX-'18 

Bruce L. Banks, of the class of 1918, 
died April 23, 1921, in New York, of 
pneumonia. 

ETTIE MOTT COOK, INST., '73 

Word has just been received of the 
death in November, 1917, of Mrs. John 
B. Cook, nee Ettie Mott, of the class of 
1873, Institute. 

ALBERT G. KARGE, '04 

Albert G. Karge, '04, died Januar'y 12, 
1921, at St. Luke's Hospital, Denver, 
Colorado, of meningitis. 

JAMES H. WILEY, EX-'77 

James H. Wiley, a matriculate of the 
class of 1877, died April 22, 1921, at 
Washington, D. C. 

MRS. ANNIE BLACK 

Mrs. Annie Black, formerly a matron 
at Bueknell Academy, passed away at 
her Carlisle home. Her only survivor 
is her daughter, Sara Black, class of 1900, 
Bueknell. 

MRS. GILES STANTON 

Mrs. Giles Stanton, a well known and 
highly respected resident of Chinchilla, 
Pa., passed away at her home on May 6, 
at the age of 75. Mi's. Stanton sent her 
six children to Bueknell. Five of these 
children survive her. They are Mrs. 
Charles Gundy, of Lewisburg, Pa.; Mrs. 
John Speicher, of Reading, Pa. ; Mr. 
Frank Stanton, of Cleveland, Ohio ;_ Mr. 
Harold Stanton, of Chinchilla, Pa., and 
Dr. Herbert Stanton, of Philadelphia, Pa. 



Future Freshmen 

Born, to Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Dyer, of 
Chester, a son and heir, Henry Hopper, 
May 1. Mr. D,ver is a graduate of the 
class of 1920. 

Born, to Professor and Mrs. Paul G. 
Stolz, May 7, a daughter. 

Born, to Mr. and Mrs. Louis Sipley, 
('18 and '16), April 10, a daughter, 
.lacqueliue Jeane. 

Born, to Mr. and Mi-s. Earl Belcher, 
(Louise Bassell, '17), April 16, a daugh- 
ter, Margaret Louise. 



Births 

Mr. and Mrs. Julius Seebach announce 
tlie birth of a daughter, Mar,y Esther, 
April 14, 1921. Mr. Seebach will teach 
next year in Rochester (N. Y.) High 
School. 



The Ithaca Conference 

Over sixt.v representatives of Amer- 
ican colleges and universities scattered 
from Maine to Georgia, and Massachu- 
setts to Texas, gathered at Ithaca, May 
19, 1921, for a three days' conference on 
aluniui work. Under the genial guidance 
of R. W. "Tubby" Saylor, Alumni Sec- 
retary at Cornell, the delegates spent a 
busy and delightful three days. A sum- 
mer hotel and a launch had been re- 
served for their use. They were the 
dinner guests of Cornell University, and 
enjoyed the circus, baseball game and 
regatta which feature the Cornell "Spring 
Day." 

The high points of the convention 
in a business way were the discussions^ 
of alumni participation in college sup- 
port and management. Among the most 
interesting papers presented were those 
of Professor Butterfield, of Worcester 
Polytechnic Institute, on "Some Results 
of Alumni Giving," in which he sum- 
marized the contributions of American 
college graduates to their various institu- 
tions. In the discussion which followed 
his paper a computation was made of 
the actual amount contributed by 
alumni in recent years, in which the 
startling discovery was made that in 
the two and a half years since the 
signing of the armistice over one hun- 
dred and ten millions of dollars have 
been given American colleges by their 
former students. This is the amount 
actually given to date, taking no ac- 
count of campaigns recently begun. 

Miss Snow, of Smith College, dis- 
cussed alumni membership on college 
governing boards. As a result of a thor- 
ough investigation she had discovered 
that the average alumni representation on 
boards of control is forty per cent., the 
average direct alumni representation 
twenty per cent., with an average term 
of office of four years for the direct 
representatives. 

Mr. Towner, alumni secretary at the 
University of Maine, gave a discussion 
of the typical organization of Alumni 
Association executive bodies. From his 
examination of the usage of American 
colleges he considers the ideal Alumni 
Council to be composed of representa- 
tives of local alumni clubs and repre- 
sentatives of classes, with alumni rep- 
resentatives on the Board of Trustees 
ex-officio members. A frequent practice 
is to have the last five ex-presidents of 
the Alumni Association also included in 
the membership. 

Mr. Souby, of Vanderbilt, outlined the 
manifold activities of the Vanderbilt 
Alumni office, which aims to be a clear- 
ing-house of undergraduate activities, 
and "to educate the undergraduate into 
an intelligent and loyal alumnus." 

The entire conference, with the mass 
of information brought forward con- 
cerning alumni interest and participa- 
tion in college activities, was striking 
evidence of the almost universal trend 
toward alumni support and control of 
the higher educational institutions of 
the United States. 



10 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



Athletics 




Bucknell Wins Track Trophy 

Bueknell won by a large margin the 
Central Pennsylvania Track Conference 
meet at Harrisburg, May 30, thus win- 
ning the honor of being the tirst col- 
lege to have its name engraved on the 
large trophy cup awarded by the Phila- 
delphia Public Ledger to the winner of 
the meet. The Bueknell athletes declare 
that they will win the next two years 
in order to retain it in permanent pos- 
session. 

Presenting the liest-balaneed team of 
the seven competing colleges, Bueknell 
amassed a total of 42 points to .30 for 
Gettysburg, 29 for Muhlenberg, 27 for 
Dickinson, eight for Drexel, four for 
Juniata, and one each for Lebanon Val- 
ley and Susquehanna. Bucknell placed 
in every event save the hundred-yard 
dash, the 220-yard hurdles, and the dis- 
cus. 

The Bucknell point-winners were: 
Mile run — Gdaniec, first. Time 4:46 1-5. 
440-yard dash — Joseph and Hahn, tied 
for first. Time 54 4-5. Two-mile run — 
Schmidt, second. 220-yard dash — Joseph, 
first. Time 23 seconds. Half-mile run — 
Moore, second ; Chapman, fourth. High 
jump — ^Wren tied for first, Treadwell 
tied for third. Height 5 feet, 6 inches. 
Pole vault — Haslam, first; height 11 feet, 
4% inches, breaking the Association rec- 
ord. Shot-put — Dinn, fourth. Broad 
jump — Dinn, third. 

Graduate Manager C. E. Glass, who 
has had personal charge of training the 
track team, was delighted with the success 
of his proteges, and hopes to repent next 

year. 

. ^ ■ 

Track Team Defeats Dickinson 

The field and track team defeated 
Dickinson on Tustin Field, May 21. Has- 
lam broke his own pole-vault record b.v 
jumping 11 feet 8 inches. The two-mile 
race in which Schmidt defeated Mullen, 
of Dickinson, was the prettiest race of 
the daj'. 



Pitt Alumni Entertain Team 

On Friday evening. May 13, the base- 
ball team was the guest of the Pitts- 
burgh Alumni Association at a luncheon 
in the Venice restaurant. The evening 
was opened with a full course dinner, 
featuring chicken. Eoj' BostAvick was 
scheduled to officiate at the affair but 
due to a very strenuous day spent iu 
getting people out of jail, he handel 
the honors to Dr. Goldsmith. 

Dr. Goldsmith commented upon the 
fine showing the team had made the da3' 
before ap^ainst Pittsburgh. Even though 
they had been defeated they had fought 
to the finish. Attention was then called 
to the fact that we had two 1920 and '21 
captains at the affair, and as a result 
Kostos, Bowser, Linker and Dietrich 
gave short speeches. Manager Johnson 
was next to be called to the floor for a 
few words. C. N. Loveland, who bears 
the title "Captain of the Pittsburgh 
Alumni Association of Bucknell Base- 
ball Team," then told how that asso- 
ciation would beat any combination of 
Alumni at the national sport. He also 
compared the fighting of the present 
Bucknell team to those some years back. 

Dr. Goldsmith was then called away 
and Mr. Bostwick spoke on "Doc's" affilia- 
tion with Bucknell athletics. He told 
how "Doc" had always since he was 
first associated with Bucknell, fought 
the fight for .his Alma Mater with all 
his heart. 

The affair was closed with a Buck- 
nell-ell-ell for the team from the Alumni, 
the team reciprocating — Bucknellian. 



Track Team Places in Middle 
Atlantics 

Bucknell placed seventh among tlio 
seventeen colleges competing in the 
Middle Atlantic Chmapionships at Bal- 
timore, May 14. Joseph finished second 
to Harmer, of Delaware, in a sensational 
quarter-mile race. Schmidt took second 
in the two-mile. Haslam tied for sec- 
ond in the pole-vault. 



Thanks Again 

The Alumni Oflice is gi-ateful to J. B. 
Cook of the class of 1873 for a copy of 
the 1906 L'Agenda. Other alumni who 
liave duplicates of issues of any year 
will confer a real favor by sending them 
to the office, as we have but one copy 
of most of the L'Agendas, and that one 
cojiy sees hard use. To insure the per- 
manence of the collection, there should 
be a duplicate of every one. 




CAPTAIN U. B. LINKER 

Baseball 

The season to date has been rather 
more than fairly successful, the team 
having won eight of the fifteen games 
played. In several games the Varsity 
has made a run-away, while the games 
lost have been by small scores. The one 
exception, the St. Vincent's game, was 
played in a gale of wind which made 
real baseball impossible. The team has 
hit the ball hard, and the fielding has 
been good, though not perfect. The 
scores to date have been: 

April 7— 
Bucknell. . 

April 13— 
Bucknell. . 

April 22— 
Bucknell . , 

April 27— 
Bucknell. . 

May 7— 
Bueknell. . 

May 11— 
Bucknell . . 



Engagements 

Tlie engagament of Constantino Nagro, 
Music, '17, who is now with the Music 
School of Albright College, and Miss 
Dorothy Mary Chubb, teacher of piano 
and harmony at the same institution, 
was recently announced. 



May 12— 
Bucknell. . 

May 13— 
Bucknell. . 

May 14— 
Bucknell . . 

May 18— 
Bucknell. . 

May 24— 
Bucknell. 

May 25— 
Bucknell. 

May 26— 
Bucknell. , 

May 27— 
Bucknell. 

May 30— 
Bucknell. 



1 Gettysburg 6 

15 Delaware 8 

1 Lebanon Valley. . 

4 Duquesne 1 

Lebanon Valley.. 2 

10 St. Vincents 19 

(GYo innings) 

1 Pittsburgh 3 

11 Carnegie Tech.... 9 
7 Duquesne 8 

4 Pitt Collegians... 
11 Dickinson 3 

Gettysburg 2 

7 Mt. St. Marys 8 

5 Albright 3 

16 Juniata 3 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



11 



Alumni Activities 



May Dinner of New York Alumni 

The second dinner and reunion of 
Alumni, of New York City and vicin- 
ity, was attended by sixty Bueknell 
entliusiasts. Not all of these were 
graduates of the institution, a few be- 
ing friends and special guests. The 
dinner was held in the banquet hall 
of the Park Avenue Hotel. Dr. Gessler, 
1864, was toastmaster and ijroved him- 
self to be a finished expert in that ca- 
pacity. He immediately communicated 
his enthusiasm and geniality to the whole 
gathering. In Ms introductory remarks 
he cited the names of some of the promi- 
nent alumni as evidence of the college's 
claims to fame. He recalled also a num- 
ber of his contemporaries in the Buek- 
nell of long ago. The introductions he 
gave to the various speakers were at 
once witty and effective. 

Dean Lewellyn Phillips brought a mes- 
sage direct from the college. He pointed 
out that the old staff of "mere" teach- 
ers had either finished or were about to 
finish their work. To carry on the tradi- 
tions of the college and to maintain the 
personal relationships with the students 
that men like Perrine, Bartol and others 
had maintained, there must be a staff of 
teachers who have primary regard for 
the students and secondary regard for 
the subject. The distinction between 
the university teacher and the college 
professor is that the former gives first 
importance to the subject and the lat- 
ter first importance to the student. Dr. 
Phillips declared that the present was a 
critical time for the college in that it 
faced the difficult task of securing teach- 
ers who could adequately take the place of 
those who had made the college what 
it is. 

ill-. J. S. Swartz, president of the 
board of trustees, agreed to attend the 
dinner on condition that he would not 
be called upon to speak. Dr. Gessler, 
however, insisted that he rise and thus 
make himself known to those alumni 
who were not familiar witli him. Once 
on his feet he could not very well re- 
frain from making a few remarks. He 
recalled that it was while Dr. Gessler 
was a student that the famous cow was 
led to the college belfry and her tail 
tied to the clapper of the bell. (Dr. 
Gessler denied all responsibility for this 
heinous offense). Mr. Swartz recalled 
the recent purchase of 176 acres adjoin- 
ing the present campus limits, the com- 
pletion of a large addition to the chem- 
ical laboratory and the purchase of 
buildings downtown for women stu- 
dents. He referred also to the large 
number of applicants for entrance in 
the college. 

Dr. Arthur Bestor, the president of 
the Chautauqua institution, was the chief 
guest at the dinner and made the prin- 
cipal address. His presence was all the 
more appreciated on account of his long 
friendship for Dean Phillips, a former 
classmate of his at the ITniversity of 
Chicago. The theme of his address was 
a challenge to the trained men and 
women of today presented by a world 
which has suffered a lamentable moral 
depression. He referred with particular 
emphasis to the need of leadership for 



the large number of workers whose leis- 
ure has been so tremendously increased. 
A college cannot educate a man or wom- 
an. They are educated from what comes 
from within them. The alumni of the 
small colleges must work for their in- 
stitutions because no one else will do it 
for them. 

Professor Leo Eoekwell asserted that 
the tendency among colleges today is 
toward alumni control. He urged the 
presence of the alumni at commence- 
ment in order that they might best con- 
sider how to organize themselves for 
service to the college. 

Dr. J. M. Stewart, 1876, recalled among 
other things the great physical agility 
of Professor Bartol. He paid testimony 
to the gigantic intellectual stature of 
Dr. Loomis and the other teachers at 
the college when he was a student. His 
home town, Paterson, was active in send- 
ing students to Lewisburg. 

W. W. Pangburn, speaking for the 
committee on arrangements, expressed 
the conviction that it was through such 
occasions as this dinner and visits to the 
college that the alumni are able to re- 
tain a true perspective of the greatness 
of the college. Without such reunions 
and visits we tend to become like the 
woman who was enjoying her first trip 
in an aeroplane. This lady had a small 
pearl pin in her collar and noticed that 
it had disappeared only after the plane 
had reached a great height. Failing to 
discover it in the machine she looked 
down and was certain she saw it on the 
ground far below. She asked the aviator 
to descend at once in order to get her 
pin, but he replied with a pitying 
smile, "Lady, that isn't your pin, that's 
Lake Erie." The committee had grounds 
to feel gratified over the speakers whom 
it had been able to secure for the occa- 
sion. 

Professor A. T. Poffenberger declared 
that nowhere had he met teachers who 
were equal to those whom he knew at 
Bueknell. He analyzed the present situa- 
tion as follows: The college faced a 
dilemma. It desired to get men who 
first of all were interested in the stu- 
dents and could impart knowledge to 
them. At the same time it felt the pre- 
vailing general demand throughout the 
country for men with degrees attached 
to their names. He hoped the college 
would have the courage to resist the 
popular demand and go out after men 
who were primarily good teachers 
whether they had degrees or not. 

Milton Davies, ex-'02, was thankful for 
the few years he had had at the college 
and testified warmlv to the good the 
college had done liim. 



Dr.Walker Heads Alumni Religious Committee 

Dr. Charles A. Walker, '89, has been 
appointed by President Joseph W. Hen- 
derson, of the Alumni Association, to 
head the Religious Activities Commit- 
tee of the Association. The task of the 
committee is to enlist alumni support 
for the student religious organizations, 
and act in an advisory capacity to these 
organizations. Dr. Walker will organize 
his committee as soon as he has the task 
definitely outlined. 



Lycoming County Bucknellians 
Hold Banquet 

The best attended and most success- 
ful banquet ever held by the Lycoming 
County Bueknell Club took place at 
seven o'clock on Wednesday evening, 
Maj^ 2oth, at the Williamsport Country 
Club. President Oliver J. Decker, Esq., 
was in charge of the affair, gathering 
the clans to the number of 75, from 
Williamsport, Munc-y, Picture Bocks, 
Linden, and other parts of the county. 

President Hunt was the guest of honor, 
the other specially invited members of 
the faculty and staff present being Pro- 
fessor Norman H. Stewart, Professor C. 
Arthur Lindermann, and the newly- 
elected Registrar, Theron Clark, former- 
ly of Brown University, Providence, 
E. L 

One long table extended through the 
entire length of the main dining rooms 
of the club, flanked at either end by a 
cross table. The decorations were iris 
in shades approaching as nearly as pos- 
sible the regulation orange and blue. 

Before the banquet and between 
courses the assembled guests rendered a 
program of Bueknell songs, lead by a 
quartet consisting of Mrs. Oliver J. 
Decker, Mi's. Carl Schug, Clarence E. 
Sprout, Esq., and Ernest Burrows, of 
Picture Eoeks, with Mrs. John Eishel at 
the piano. 

At the close of the repast, which gave 
opportunity for many an informal re- 
union. President Decker introduced the 
Lewisburg guests who spoke enthusiasti- 
cally and entertainingly on the following 
subjects: President Hunt, "College 
Friendships;" Professor Lindemann, 
"Impossible Grading;" Eegistrar Clark, 
"Futures," and Professor Stewart, 
"Leaves of Elm and Oak." These talks 
aroused renewed interest in Bueknell, 
President Hunt's talk carrying every 
Bueknellian back to the "good old days" 
spent in "Sem." or on the hill, creating in 
each and every one a desire to seek the 
old "Burg'' once more for the approach- 
ing seventy-fifth commencement. Dur- 
ing his talk the President took occasion 
to pay trilnite to those members of 
faculty and staff who were present. He 
also spoke enthusiastically of the excel- 
lent work now being done by Professor 
Leo L. Eoekwell in editing the Alumni 
Monthly, enlarging its scope, stirring up 
enthusiasm among the "old grads," and 
arranging for reunions of the various 
classes. 

Professor Lindemann's talk on "Im- 
possible Grading" was the sort of talk 
that could have been given only by a 
man who has stood back of so many 
college students, helping them, encourag- 
ing them, "boosting" all along the line. 
He was given rousing applause by those 
present, practically all of whom had 
come into contact with him in class room 
or "Burg." The alumni appreciate Pro- 
fessor Lindemann's work as one of 
the staunehest members of the faculty, 
serving as he does as secretary of that 
bodj'. As usual his talk was replete 
with kindly humor and typical "Linde- 
mann stories." 

(Continued on page 12) 



12 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



Wliile Dr. Stewart was a new ac- 
quaintance to some of those present, his 
talk on "Leaves of Elm and Oak" showed 
that while he is not a B. U. gi'aduato 
he is one of the most enthusiastic of 
Alma Mater's foster sons. Naturally, 
his subject of biology furnished a basis 
for a splendid talk. Professor Stewart, 
while one of the younger members of 
the faculty, has won for himself a fine 
place in the regard of both undergradu- 
ates and alumni. 

Registrar Clark was the last speaker 
on the jjrogram. He impressed his hear- 
ers as a splendid first mate to "Captain" 
Hunt. The position of registrar is an 
important one in anj' college, dealing 
as it does with the business part of the 
institution, requiring tact, executive 
ability and real human understanding. 
It is the opinion of the Lycoming Coun- 
ty Alumni that in Registrar Clark the 
university has the "right man in the 
right place." 

At the close of the post prandium a 
brief business session resulted in the 
election of the following officers for the 
ensuing year : President, Oliver J. 
Decker, Esq.; Vice President, Harrj' C. 
Fithian, Esq.; Secretary, Miss Anne W. 
Galbraith, and Treasurer, John D. Rishel. 



THESE FOLKS WILL BE HERE 

(Continued from page 4) 

J. B. Wood, '94. 
R. W. Everett, '16. 
Fred Zug, '07. 
L. E. Lighten, '20. 
E. Greene, '95. 
Edward P. Dufton, '12. 
William Leiser, III, '09. 
Milton G. Evans, '82. 
W. Stanley Reitz, '14. 
Maurice D. Hooven, Jr., '20. 
L. W. Robey, '04. 
Joseph C. Hazen, '99. 
H. M. Lowry, '98. 

E. H. Button, '98. 
Howard L. Barer, '19. 
Earl B. West, '17. 
Harry G. Willson, '17. 
Baker Bernhart, '13. 

J. Theodore Park, '06. 
George Ballentine, '71. 
Francis C. Beckley, '17. 
Merrill W. Brown, '20. 
J. R. Golightly, '14. 

D. A. McNeal, '12. 

P. A. Berkenstock, '18. 
Miller A. Johnson, '20. 
L.vC. Davis, '76. 

F. E. Stetler, '17. 
J. N. Glover, '85. 
A. M. Davis, '71. 
Clarence M. Kriner, '17. 
A. L. Sherk, '20. 

E. W. Rumsey, '06, and father. 
Marshall 6. Smith, '04. 

W. W. Raker, '07. 
James S. Swartz, Trustee. 
Mrs. A. J. Irey, '81. 
R. M. Felton, '17. 
Joseph Henderson, '08. 
C. H. Davies, ex-'19. 
David J. Martin, '20. 
Paul D. Noftsker, ex-'08. 
Mrs. Paul P. Aller, '15. 
James P. Harris, '12. 
J. Warren Davis, '96. 
Edward C. Kunkle, '97. 
H. G. Florin, '09. 



Warren H. Slocum, '20. 

Herbert P. Harris, '96. 

Mrs. Edna S. Slif er, '00. ■ 

T. L. Williams, '02. 

G. H. Baldwin, '08. 

L. F. Lyne, '14. 

L. A. Henderson, '12. 

J. K. Weaver, '61. 

Harry E. McCormick, ex-'04. 



A. J. Irey, '79. 

Max C. Wiant, '10. 

Mrs. Milton W. Lowry, '83. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry C. Fithian, '98. 

Mrs. Kate Goddard Jones and husband. 

Dorothy Thompson Gilbert, '19. 

Howard R. Pars, '19. 

Carl E. Geiger, '15. 

Harry L. Shea, '20. 




Glee Club Ends Successful Year 



The college Glee Club again looks back 
on a year of hard work and successful 
accomplishment. During the season it 
has sung in thirty evening concerts and 
twenty afternoon high school concerts 
to audiences of more than twenty-five 
thousand persons. Its members have 
been entertained in more than seven 
hundred and fifty homes, in all of which 
they have acted as missionaries of Buck- 
nell, and President Hunt has received 
many letters of praise for their gentle- 
manly conduct. 

Much credit for the year's success is 
due to Manager Ralph Hartz, '22, of 
Reading, who has worked in season and 
out for the club. The other otficer. 
President Norman Appleton, '22, of Phil- 
adelphia, and Publicity Manager Daniel 
Villinger, '24, of Williamsport, deserve 
mention also for their faithful service. 

Director Paul G. Stolz has as usual 
sacrificed endless time and effort to the 
club, and his tireless devotion to drill- 



ing the chorus work and musical features 
is responsible for the finished work 
which marked the programs. 

The club wishes to express its appre- 
ciation of the lo,yal efforts of the alumni 
to make the club at home in their vari- 
ous communities, and in making the trips 
financially successful. To make a com- 
plete list of those who thus contributed 
would be impossible in limited space, 
but each one who was active in this way 
is present in the minds and hearts of 
the club members. 

Thanks is due also to the pastors of 
Baptist churches who so willingly co- 
operated in their home communities, and 
the club wishes to taJie this opportunity 
of thanking them. 

The club plans next year to make 
its work even better than that of this 
year and to extend its itinerary, tak- 
ing in several of the larger cities which 
were not visited this season, notably 
New York, Philadelphia and Washington. 



Bucknell in China 



"Charley" Harvey, during his recent 
sta.y at the hill, brought with him the 
latest word from the Bucknellians who 
are helping to solve the problems of 
China. 

Rawlinson, '99, is continuing his good 
work as head of a boys' school, svip- 
plemented by his activities as member 
of the important China Continuation 
Committee, the bod.y which co-ordinates 
and unifies the Christian work in China, 
and as editor of the "Cliiuese Recorder," 
a missionary publication of great weight. 

Keen, '99, is still head of the ITnion 
Language School at, Nanking, training 
missionaries in the Chinese language. 
So great is his skill in this, says Ha.rve.y, 
that he renders the stud.y of Chinese, 
which is norniall.y regarded as dry and 
difficult, inspiring and delightful to the 
student. He and his assistants train 



from fifty to a hundred students annu- 
ally. 

Hylbert, '05, besides the work men- 
tioned in another place in the Monthly, 
has supervision of the missionary work 
in a group of islands of great importance 
because it includes one of the four or 
five great Buddhist centers in China. 

Kate Goddard Jones, who has assist- 
ed her husband in his work for the 
English Baptists in Shantung province, 
is, as noted recently in the Monthly, at 
present on furlough in this country. 

Dr. and Mrs. C. B. Lesher, both '01, 
are also on furlough, but will return 
soon to their work as medical mis- 
sionaries. 

"Charley" Bromley, '09, Professor in 
the Shanghai Christian College, who is 
rejoicing as noted in the April Monthly, 
in the birth of an heir, will return to 
his teaching this fall refreshed by his 
long staj' in this country. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



13 



For Real Service, Let B. U. Men Serve You 

During thie past few years over five hundred (500) Bucknell Students have taken out Life 
Insurance policies with the Equitable Life of Iowa. Successful men invariably are men who, 
in early years, realized the value of life insurance. 



Tyson, '11 



Life Insurance makes for Success 

RICE & TYSON, Gen. Agts., 906 Kunkel Bldg., Harrisburg, Pa. 



Andrew A. Leiser 
U. at L., '69 



Andrew A. Leiser, Jr. 
B. U., '98. Yale. '99 



Law Offices of 

Andrew Albright Leiser 
Andrew Albright Leiser, Jr. 

Lewisburg, Union County, 
Pennsylvaaiia 

H.B. WEAVER, '14 

Catalogs, Yearbooks, House 
Organs 

THE PITTSBURGH PRINTING CO. 

530 Fernando St. 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 



G. F. RASSWEILER 

Professor of Public Speaking 
BUCKNELL UNIVERSITY 



Dramatic Reader, Lecturer and 
Entertainer 

Ralph L. Belford, '05 

ATTORNEY-AT-LAW 



MILTON, PA. 



WM. R. FOLLMER 

ATTORNEY-AT-LAW 
Notary in Office 



LEWISBURG, 



PENNSYLVANIA 



John F. Winkelblech, '14 

Invest in a Farm! 
E. A. STROUT FARM AGENCY 

Knows the Good Ones 
Advertises and Sells Them 

Phone 113R8 Lewisburg, Pa. 



FOR LEGAL SERVICE IN PITTSBURGH 

'96— A. C. ROHLAND, 1203 Oliver Building. 
'00— H. B. WASSELL, 1404 Union Bank Building. 
'04— E. P. GRIFFITHS, ^r Legal Dept., Philadelphia Co. 
'05— E. A. MORTON, 1204 Park Building. 
'05— R. G. BOSTWICK, 1101 Berger Building. 
'09— H. G. FLORIN, 1101 Berger Building. 



WHEN IN ATLANTIC CITY 

Remember 

The Chelsea Baptist Church 

is on Atlantic Ave., between 
Brighton and Morris 

THOS. .1. CROSS, D.D., '91, Minister 



PAUL G. SMITH,'05 

Attorney-at-Law 
HABBISBURG, PA. 

State Department practice, including 

Corporation Tax and Public 

Service Commission matters 



Harold C. Edwards, '15 



ATTORNEY-AT-LAW 



STROUDSBURG, PENNA. 



GEO. P. MILLER, '84 



FIRE INSURANCE 



82 University Ave., LEWISBURG, PA. 



New and Used Motors Phone 

Heavy Construction Calvert 

Rewinding 3573 

The Keystone Electric Co. 

R. K. HOKE, '15 

108 S. Grant St., BALTIMORE, MD. 

A. DONALD GRAY, '14 

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT 

8120 Euclid Ave., CLEVELAND, OHIO 



SAFETY SAVES SORROW- 

Many Bucknell "Grads" have been wise enough to protect their lives with Aetna Life Insurance, 
their incomes with Aetna Health and Accident Insurance, and their business with Aetna Com- 
pensation Insurance. The Aetna is the largest Company in the world writing these lines. 

THE WILLIAM S. ESSICK, General Agency, Union Trust Building, Harrisburg, Pa. 
FRED V. HOCKEY, '12, Agency Manager. 



14 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



Receipts on Endowment and Equipment 



(Continued) 



Amount previously reported $28,313.88 



William E. Martin, Lewisburg, Pa 

Llewellyn Phillips, Lewisburg, Pa 

Mrs. Leroy Stephens, Lewisburg, Pa.. . . . 
William M. Woodward, McKeesport, Pa. 

Emory W. Hunt, Lewisburg, Pa 

Leroy Stephens, Lewisburg, Pa 

A. J. Irey, Danville, Pa 

Leo L. Rockwell, Lewisburg, Pa 

Thirza May Bromley, Forsythe, Ga 

Warren F. Brooks, Spring City, Pa 

William G. Owens, Lewisburg, Pa 

Mrs. W. C. Bartol, Lewisburg, Pa 

Martin L. Drum, Lewisburg, Pa-. 

Charles A. Gundy, Lewisburg, Pa 

Evelin Stanton Gundy, Lewisburg, Pa... 

Weber L. Gerhart, Lewisburg, Pa 

Charles A. Lindemann, Lewisburg, Pa.. . 

Thomas F. Hamblin, Lewisburg, Pa 

Lois Hamblin, Lewisburg, Pa 

Clarissa Hamblin, Lewisburg, Pa 

William C. Bartol, Lewisburg, Pa 

Carrie Foresman, Lewisburg, Pa 

Josephine Lawshe, Lewisburg, Pa 

Louise W. Lawshe, Lewisburg, Pa 

Helen H. Zeller, Lewisburg, Pa 

Mrs. William G. Owens, Lewisburg, Pa. 

Martha W. Kalp, Lewisburg, Pa 

Mrs. W. G. Payne, Lewisburg, Pa 



50.00 

10.00 

5.00 

200.00 
40.00 
75.00 
50.00 
70.00 
10.00 
10.00 

100.00 
5.00 

100.00 
25.00 
15.00 
25.00 

250.00 
80.00 
10.00 
10.00 
80.00 
26.00 
15.60 
15.60 
5.00 

100.00 
20.00 
12.00 



Anna C. Judd, Lewisburg, Pa $ .50.00 

E. M. Heim, Lewisburg, Pa 100.00 

Anna R. Carey, Lewisburg, Pa 50.00 

Paul Stolz, Le-n-isburg, Pa 100.00 

George F. Ballets, Hamburg, New Jersey 5.00 

J. Warren Davis,' Trenton, New Jersey 156.00 

Helena M. Olds, New Platz, New York 20.00 

Norman H. Stewart, Lewisburg, Pa 100.00 

H. S. Everett, Lewisburg, Pa 30.00 

Sai-ah Van Gundy, Lewisburg, Pa 50.00 

Katlieriue A. Shields, Lewisburg, Pa ■ o.OO 

Ellen H. Shields, Lewisburg, Pa 5.00 

Charlotte E. Shields, Lewisburg, Pa 5.00 

B. W. Griffith, Lewisburg, Pa 50.00 

E. T. Stevenson, Franklin, Pa 25.00 

Feme Braddock Stevenson, Franklin, Pa 100.00 

Ruth L. Thomas, Lake Crystal, Minn 5.00 

S. A. Hart, Mt. Holly, N. J 50.00 

C. D. Lov eland, Pittsburgh, Pa 100.00 

Amy Patterson Stevenson, New Tork Citj' 5.00 

J. R. Golightly, Kingston, Pa 10.00 

Mary L. Carey, East Dowiiington, Pa 5.00 

Irma L. Worrell, East Downington, Pa 5.00 

Emma M. Bolenius, Lancaster, Pa 25.00 

Frank Anderson, Auburn, N. Y 5.00 

Harold L. Shimer, Milton, Pa.. 100.00 

John T. Judd, Lewisburg, Pa 1.000.00 



Total to May 2-4, 1921 $31,889.08 



In addition to the above the Treasurer has received from the Baptist Education Board $33,710.50. This being our por- 
tion to date of the New World Movement Funds, and includes the designated gifts of many Alumni, among whom we have 
learned of the following: 



Mrs. R. W. Allen, Williamsport, Pa $ 100.00 

William F. Applegate, Williamsport, Pa 5.20 

A. H. Beaver, Cincinnati, Ohio 25.00 

John E. Bennett, New Monmouth, N. J 10.00 

H. E. Campbell, Elizabethtown, Pa 17.19 

Mrs. H. E. Campbell, Elizabethtown, N. J 8.59 

Roy Cherry, Williamsport, Pa 52.00 

Mr. and Mrs. E. W. Cober, Wilkinsburg, Pa 42.00 

E. C. Condict, Trenton, N. J 10.00 

H. E. Cole, Pittsburgh, Pa 100.00 

Mr. Cope, Pittsburgh, Pa 100.00 

E. J. Cruse, Picture Rocks, Pa 5.75 

J. S. Currin, Steelton, Pa 2 00 

Mrs. J. C. Diffenderfer, Normal, 111 7.20 

Milton G. Evans, Upland, Pa 503.75 

Mrs. Julia Finnefrock, Williamsport, Pa 7.S0 

Mr. and Mrs. E. H. FUnt, Philadelphia, Pa 7.10 

Carl E. Geiger, Hightstown, N. J 20.00 

Dr. T. A. Gill, Philadelphia, Pa 100.00 

G. E. Good, Steelton, Pa 4.00 

Mr. and Mrs. R. C. Hassrick, Philadelphia, Pa 16.00 

L. B. Heile, Steelton, Pa ■. - . 2.00 

D. M. Hertzog, Uniontown, Pa 500.00 

H. J. Kaltenthaler, Philadelphia, Pa 1,000.00 

W. S. Leeper, Mt. Pleasant, Pa ' 24.00 

Herbert Leinbeck, Williamsport, Pa 1.05 

Mrs. Herbert Leinbeck, Williamsport, Pa 30.85 

Mr. and Mrs. M. C. Leinbach, Williamsport, Pa 125.00 



W. R. Lewis, Steelton, Pa 

James Lii)pincott, Sewickley, Pa 

Mrs. G. S. McDowell, Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Mrs. Anna McKinney, Riverton, N. J.. . 
Fred O. Mitstifer, Williamsport, Pa 



1 

200 

200, 

5 

50 

Dr. and Mrs. E. M. Nichols, Philadelphia, Pa 125 

T. J. Phillips, Atglen, Pa 50 

Charles Ranch, Williamsport, Pa 4 

Eli Reinhold, Upland, Pa 500 

Mr. and Mrs. E. M. Richards, WOkinsburg, Pa 23, 

Laura Richards, Wilkinsburg, Pa 8 

Llewellyn Richards, Hazleton, Pa 10, 

R. R. Rivenburg, Hightstown, N. J 20, 

Mr. and Mrs. L. Ross, Norristown, Pa 75. 

Benjamin Savage, Turbotville, Pa 20, 

Dora Shank, Steelton, Pa 

Arthur A. Smith, Williamsport, Pa 87, 

Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Stabler, Williamsport, Pa 20 

D. B. Stauft, Uniontown, Pa 100, 

M. F. Supples, West Chester, Pa 150, 

Ernest L. Tustin, Philadelphia, Pa 150, 

Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Waldron, Williamsport, Pa 31, 

Joseph K. Weaver, Norristown, Pa 210 

Laurens W. Weddell, Oberlin, Ohio 10 

A. Grace White, Bradford, Pa 77 

Grace Woodward, Bradford. Pa 56 

Mrs. Emma Zelley, Riverton, N. J 25 



,00 
.00 
,00 
,00 
.00 
.00 
,00 
.00 
.00 
,31 
,75 
,00 
.00 
.00 
,00 
.50 
.50 
,00 
,00 
,00 
,00 
,00 
.00 
.00 
,50 
,00 
,00 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY 



15 



ADVERTISING RATES 

1 Time 4 Times 6 Times 

1 inch deep, 1 column $ 1.00 $ 3.50 $ 5.00 

1 inch deep, 3 columns 3.00 10.00 14.00 

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Full Page 15.00 57.50 85.00 



Send Copy 

to 

H. S. EVERETT, 

Lewisbui'g', Pa. 



FISK TEACHERS* 
AGENCY 

549 Union Arcade, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Teachers urgently needed 
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Teachers for 
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Schools for 
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NATIONAL TEACHERS' AGENCY, Inc. 

D. H. Cook, MgT., 326-27-28 Perry Bldg., 1530 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

"I HAVE PROMOTED OVER 15,000 TEACHERS. WHY NOT YOU?"— D. H. Cook 

BUCKNELL GRADUATES WANTED HAVE PLACED HUNDREDS OF THEM 



Under the Same Management Thirty- 
Seven Years 
The School Bulletin Teachers' 
Agency has on its lists many Buck- 
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nell men and women in high and nor- 
mal schools in New York, New Jer- 
sey, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, 
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and Texas. An agency which per- 
sonally recommends its members to 
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blanks and full information on re- 
quest. 
C. W. Bardeen, Mgr., Syracuse, N. Y. 



MODERN TEACHERS' 
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1002 Market St., Philadelphia 

Needs Hundreds of High Grade 
Teachers for every department of 
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FREE REGISTRATION 

and no expense unless position is 
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MOORE BUILDING 
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MILTON, PA. 

Distributors of 

ALL KINDS OF BUILDING 

MATERIAL 

Agents for 
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Have you mastered these new words ? 

- vitamins Bolshevild escadrille ace Taube 

Freudian camouflage fourth arm tank Boche 
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and hundreds of others are defined and pronounced in 

Webster's New International Dictionary 

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cylre you still uncertain, and are you 

embarrassed when called upon to use 

these new words, and to pronounce 

them ? Why not overcome this lack 

of information and class yourself with 

those who know ; those who win success 

in all Unes of activity ? V7h^ not let the 

New International serve you ? 

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Write for Specimen Pages, Illustrations, etc. 
Free, Pocket Maps if you mention this Publication. 




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Springfield, Mass. 



16 



BUCKNELL ALU:\INI MONTHLY 



COLLEGE INN 

Inseparably Linked With Life "On the Hill" 
GOOD EATS AND GOOD TIMES, THE LAW AND PROPHETS OF OUR MENU 

"On the Quadrangle" Payne, '09 


ilEtoisitiurg l^rusit anb 
^afe 3Bepo!Sit Co. 

Commenced Business 1907 


WAIN 1 ES 

Opposite the Trust Co. 

The Home of 

HOMEMADE ICE CREAM 

LUNCHEONETTE and PARLOR 


Union National Bank 

strong Capital and Surplus 

Government Supervision 

Member Federal Reserve 


C\PITAL $ 125,000 


Employees Acquainted Tvlth 
Business and College World 


SURPLUS AND PROFITS. . 87,000 
DEPOSITS 1,025,000 

Your Business 

Solicited, 

Appreciated 

and Protected 

DANIEL F. GREEN, Treas. 


"GEADS." Your Mail Orders for 

Bucknell or Fraternity Felt and 

Leather Goods will receive our 

Prompt and Careful Attention. 

H. F. DONEHOWER 

"Varsity Outfitter" 

W. L. DONEHOWER, '06, Mgr. 


SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES 

SAVINGS DEPARTMENT 

TRAVELERS' CHECKS 

LE ROY T. BUTLER, Cashier 


THE PURITY 

Renew Your Acquaintance With 

"The Purity Special" Sundae 

Take Home With You a Box of Our 

HOMEMADE CANDY 


JAS. P. BENNETT 

LOCAL AND LONG 
DISTANCE HAULING 

Phone 84 LEWISBUEG 


RAEZER'S 

CASH AND CARRY GROCERIES 
LEWISBURG AND MILTON 


W. A. BLAIR 

FRESH AND SMOKED MEATS 

Wholesaler of Pork, Sausage, Etc. 

FANCY AND STAPLE GROCERIES 

Oysters in Season 


University Book 
Store 

BOOKS, STATIONERY 

and SCHOOL SUPPLIES 

MAIL ORDERS PROMPTLY 
ATTENDED TO 

We Pay Postage 


H. J. Nogel & Bros. 

JEWELER AND OPTOMETRIST 

LEWISBUHG, PEKN'A. 


J. FRED ZELLER 

JEWELER 

and 
OPTOMETRIST 


Engraving Watch Repairing 

GRENOBLE BROS. 

UNIVERSITY JEWELERS 
Exclusive Columbia Agents 


J. G. REEDY 

Dealer in 
FURNITURE AND CARPETS 

530 Market Street 


We Want Your SHIRTS 

Mail 'em in 

PEERLESS LAUNDRY 

Thompson, '04. Donehoiver, '06 
Milton Lewisburg Sunbury 


Steininger Cafe 

Open 6 a. m. to 1:30 a. m. 

Rooms With Hot and Cold Running 

Water 

GEO. E. IRVIN, Mgr. 

Tliird & Market Sts., Lewisbnrg, Pa. 


THE 

SHIELDS 

PHOTOGRAPHIC 
STUDIO 


E. C. NOLL 

THE 
FEED MAN 


Herman & Leiser 

DRY GOODS, NOTIONS AND 

LADIES' READY - TO - WT;AR 

APPAREL 


DISTINCTIVE STATIONERY 
at 

BAKER'S PHARMACY 


DR. E. S. HEISER 

DRUGGIST 
Developing and Printing 


W. C. Walls, John W. Bucher, 
Pres. Cashier 

The Lewisburg National Bank 

The oldest Bank in Union County. 
Established 1853. Capital $100,000. 
Surplus and Profits $100,000. 37c In- 
terest paid on Savings Accounts. 


DELMAR 

INN 

A. J. DUNKLE, Prop. 


IREY'S 
SHOE STORE 

A. .1. Irey, '7!) 


HILL'S DRUG STORES 

2 STORES 2 
LEWISBURG PENNA. 



EXTRA 



Bucknell Alumni Monthly 



Lewisburg, Pa., September, 1921 



A MESSAGE 



Each stately oak on our campus is a living ex- 
ample of the power of harmonious association and 
co-operation of relatively insignificant individual 
forces. Each root and rootlet, bough, branch, 
twig and leaf, contributed its bit to the develop- 
ment of the whole, and the miracle of the mighty 
oak from the tiny acorn was accomplished. 

The problem of Bucknell's future is dependent 
on the operation of the same principles which are 
so vividly exemplified in these monuments of nat- 
ural accumulation of forces. The possibilities in 
the development of her, power and influence are 
well nigh unlimited, with the harmonious associa- 
tion and co-operation of all the individuals from 
whom she has an indisputable right to expect al- 
legiance. It is on the amalgamation of these 
scattered forces that the realization of her present 
ambition better to minister to the increasing num- 
bers of seai'chers for knowledge depends. 

Almost five thousand living Bucknellians are 
now rounding out their lives here, there, and 
everywhere throughout the world. The potential- 
ities of a combination of these forces if concent- 
rated on a single purpose are an inspiration to 
those who are near enough to discern the crying 
need for a bigger, stronger, and more influential 
Bucknell. The increasing indications of a willing- 
ness on the part of these Bucknellians to take a 
part in the mighty work before us, add encourage- 
ment to the inspiration and give birth to the hope 
that this union of forces may soon be accomplished 
to the lasting good of each one of us and untold 
thousands of others. 

A start was made last June, when a plan was 
formulated and adopted providing the machinery 
for the correlation of individual efforts. Its ef- 
fectiveness will be ensured as soon as each and 
every alumnus and friend really understands the 
University and his relation to it, and appreciates 
the part he can play in the improvement of her 
spiritual and material welfare. Papers, maga- 
zines, bulletins, catalogs, and circulars can at best 
present only an inaccurate and artificial represent- 
ation of the real state of affairs, and the one way 
foranybodytobecome really imbued withthespirit 
of Bucknell is to come here, and get into actual 
physical contact with her. For this reason two 
days — October 14th and 15th — have been desig- 



nated this year as Alumni Homecoming Days. It 
is hoped that a large number of "old grads" will 
take advantage of this opportunity to come back 
together for a renewal of faith and the promotion 
of better acquaintance. 

As announced elsewhere in this issue the 
Alumni Institute will offer this two-day sessionfor 
the development of Bucknell Boosters. Although 
the curriculum will be far from orthodox — the 
courses of studj^ will be anything and anybody, 
and the class sessions will be held anywhere and 
any time — this will be the greatest opportunity 
of really learning to know Bucknell as she is +hat 
has ever come to you since you stepped out with 
your diploma. 

A program has been arranged with the special 
view of affording the fullest opportunity to each 
one to pursue his investigation in his own way. 
Great care has been exercised to avoid the excite- 
ment of a continuous succession of meetings, ses- 
sions, and gatherings which usually make Com- 
mencement Week a sort of a scenic railway affair, 
giving glimpses of this and that, but not a touch 
of the spirit underneath. The idea is to keep 
these days as nearly normal as is possible under 
the circumstances. Nobody is to be on dress par- 
ade. The unrestrained diffusion of Bucknell 
spirit is the thing. 

When you lock the front door as you leave home 
be sure to leave all unnecessary restraint on the 
inside. You are to be a college boy or a college 
girl again for two days. Thaw out the stiff high 
brow super-dignity, loosen up your talking mus- 
cles, and make up your face into your most gra- 
cious smile. Get into that frame of mind that will 
make a night shirt parade seem the most serious 
undertaking in the world, if that happens to be the 
order of the hour. Greet your old friends with a 
slap on the back, and your new acquaintances with 
the warmth which arises from a loyalty to com- 
mon traditions. Don't let the Bucknell spirit of 
frank cordiality hide behind affected propriety. 
Push it out into the open. This is to be a family 
reunion. As President Hunt says, "Come home 
when the children are here, and conditions are 
more normal than at Commencement time." We 
need you to make Homecoming Day a success and 
an inspii-ation. We shall all be glad to see you. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



Tne Ne^\^ Constitution 

Adopted June 14, 1921 



ARTICLE I. 

NAME AND OBJECT. 

Section 1. This corporation shall 
be called the General Alumni Associa- 
tion of Bucknell University. 

Section 2. The object of the Asso- 
ciation shall be to create an active 
center of alumni who will diligently 
advance the interests of Bucknell Uni- 
versity by strengthening the relations 
between the alumni and the Univer- 
sity, by establishing efficient class 
and alumni organizations, by dissem- 
inating such information as will 
rouse the interest of the public in the 
University, by bringing to the atten- 
tion of students of preparatory schools 
and those desiring to take up profes- 
sional and post-graduate work the ad- 
vantages of Bucknell University as an 
educational institution, by fostering 
and encouraging under-graduate ac- 
tivities, by assisting to provide funds 
for the maintenance and endowment 
of the University, and by making rec- 
ommendations to the Board of Trus- 
tees of matters deemed material for 
the University's welfare. 
ARTICLE II. 

MEMBERSHIP. 

Section 1. Any person who shall 
have received from Bucknell Univer- 
sity a degree in course, or an honorary 
degree, and any person who shall have 
been duly matriculated in Bucknell 
University, shall be a member of the 
Association. Members of the faculty 
who are not graduates of the Uni- 
versity shall be associate members. 
But only those who have paid the life 
membership fee or the annual dues 
shall be eligible to vote or to hold 
office. 

Section 2. Subject to the limita- 
tions in the section next above set 
forth, any member of any Local 
Alumni Association, Alumnae Asso- 
cation, or Bucknell Club, shall be a 
member of this Association. 
ARTICLE III. 

OFFICERS. 

Section 1. The officers of this As- 
sociation shall be a President, a Secre- 
tary, and a Treasurer. The President 
shall preside over the meetings of the 
Association, the Alumni Council, and 
the Board of Managers. In his ab- 
sence or disability, the respective body 
shall choose its temporary presiding 
officer. 

Section 2. The President and Sec- 
retary shall be nominated by writing 
mailed or handed to the Secretary not 
iater than May first of each year. 
Each nomination paper shall be signed 
by three or more members. But at 
the annual business meeting any mem- 
ber may be nominated from the floor. 

Section 3. Ballots shall be mailed 
by the Secretary to each member of 
the Association, at the address on file 
with the Secretary of the Association, 
at least three weeks before the annual 
business meeting, having placed there- 
on, in alphabetical order, the names 
of all persons nominated for each such 
office, with a letter giving the date of 
the annual business meeting and noti- 
fying the members that the ballot 
must be returned by the date of said 



annual meeting. Each member who is 
entitled to vote under the provisions 
of Article II, Section 1, may vote for 
one person for each such office, and 
must sign his name to his ballot and 
return the same to the Secretary at or 
before the time of the annual business 
meeting. 

Section 4. At the annual business 
meeting, the Secretary shall place be- 
fore the meeting the names of all per- 
sons so nominated in writing for Pres- 
ident and Secretary (when a Secretary 
is to be elected) and any other mem- 
ber may be nominated from the floor. 

Section 5. Three tellers shall be 
appointed by the President. The 
names of the persons nominated for 
each office shall be balloted upon, each 
voter signing his ballot. The ballots 
cast by mail or previously filed with 
the Secretary, as hereinbefore provid- 
ed, shall be counted with the ballots 
cast at the meeting, and the person 
having the highest number of ballots 
for each said office shall be declared 
elected thereto. Only one ballot cast 
by any member for any one office 
shall be counted. 

Section 6. The Secretary shall be 
elected for two years and shall be a 
resident of Lewisburg. 

Section 7. The Treasurer shall be 
appointed by the Board of Managers 
to serve two years. He shall be a 
resident of Lewisburg. His duties 
shall be to collect the life membership 
fees and the annual dues and to act as 
custodian of the funds. He shall give 
a bond, the amount of which shall be 
determined by the Board of Managers, 
and the premium on the bond shall be 
paid by the Association. 

ARTICLE IV. 

ALUMNI COUNCIL. 

Section 1. There shall be an Alumni 
Council composed of one member from 
each local Alumni Association and 
each local Alumnae Association and 
the President and Secretary of the 
General Alumni Association. 

Section 2. Each local Alumni As- 
sociation and each local Alumnae As- 
sociation shall annually elect its rep- 
resentative to the Alumni Council in 
such manner as such Local Associa- 
tion shall provide. 

Section 3. The Alumni Council 
shall nominate persons for member- 
ship on standing committees, and shall 
advise with the Board of Managers in 
the initiation of policies for the Asso- 
ciation. 

Section 4. The Alumni Council 
shall elect at its annual meeting the 
members of the Board of Managers, 
other than President and Secretary. 

ARTICLE V. 

BOARD OF MANAGERS. 

Section 1. There shall be a Board 
of Managers, consisting of the Presi- 
dent and Secretary, and five additional 
members. Two of the members shall 
reside in Lewisburg. 

Section 2. The Board of Managers 
shall appoint the Treasurer and the 
members of all standing committees, 
giving due consideration to the nom- 
inations of the Alumni Council. 



Section 3. All business pertaining 
to the Association which is not other- 
wise provided for in the Constitution 
shall be performed by the Board of 
Managers. 

ARTICLE VI. 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Section 1. There shall be appointed 
certain Standing Committees to act 
in conjunction with appropriate com- 
mittees of Trustees, faculty, and un- 
dergraduates. 

Section 2. Each of these Commit- 
tees shall consist of five members and 
as many more persons as shall seem 
proper to the Board of Managers. 

Section 3. There shall be the fol- 
lowing Standing Committees and such 
other Standing Committees as may at 
any time be created by a two-thirds 
vote of the members present at any 
annual business meeting: 

(1) Necrology. 

(2) Finance. 

(3) Publicity. 

(4) Athletics. 

(5) Co-operation with the Uni- 
versity. 

(6) New Students and Under- 
graduate Organizations. 

(7) Reunions and Class Organ- 
izations. 

(8) Alumni Organizations. This 
Committee shall conduct the 
nomination of the Alumni 
representative on the Board 
of Trustees when such nomi- 
nation is required according 
to the resolution on the Min- 
utes of the Alumni Associa- 
tion. 

(9) Religious Activities. 

ARTICLE VII. 

SPECIAL COMMITTEES. 

Section 1. The President shall ap- 
point such Special Committees as may 
be deemed necessary by the Associa- 
tion or the Board of Managers. 
ARTICLE VIII. 

DUES. 

Section 1. The life membership fee 
shall be twenty-five dollars and the 
annual dues two dollars and fifty 
cents. 

Section 2. When a member of this 
Association is also a member of a 
Local Alumni or Alumnae Association 
it shall be the duty of the Treasurer 
of the Local Alumni or Alumnae As- 
sociation to collect and forward to 
the Treasurer of this Association the 
dues of such member, and the Treas- 
urer of this Association shall bill the 
Treasurer of the Local Alumni or 
Alumnae Association for the dues of 
all members living within the terri- 
tory of the Local Alumni Association. 
ARTICLE IX. 

MEETINGS. 

Section 1. There shall be an annual 
business meeting of the Association 
and an annual anniversary meeting of 
the Association held at Lewisburg, 
Pennsylvania, during Commencement 
Week. 

Section 2. The Alumni Council 
shall meet annually during Com- 
mencement Week, prior to the meet- 
ing of this Association. 

Continued on Page Three 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



THE ALUMNI BUSINESS 
MEETING. 



The annual business meeting of the 
Alumni Association was held June 14 
in Bucknell Hall. 

After prayer had been offered by 
the Rev. H. M. Lowry, '77, the re- 
ports of committees were heard. The 
Phi Beta Kappa Committee reported 
that the Bucknell petition for a chap- 
ter would come before the Senate of 
Phi Beta Kappa next November and 
before the National Council the fol- 
lowing fall. High hopes are enter- 
tained for the success of the petition. 
Upon request of the chairman, Dr. 
Mary Bartol Theiss, '94, the commit- 
tee was enlarged to include Dr. David 
Jayne Hill, '74, of the Phi Beta Kappa 
Senate, President Emory W. Hunt, 
Judges J. Warren Davis, '96, and A. 
W. Johnson, '96, and Director E. L. 
Tustin, '84, of the University Board of 
Trustees. Upon motion of Dr. Thomas 
M. Eastwood, '72, a vote of apprecia- 
tion of the work of the committee was 
taken. 

Leo L. Rockwell, '07, reported for 
the Alumni Monthly, explaining the 
change of form and the scheme of 
support, also plans for next year. He 
brought forward for action the pro- 
posed merger of a student undergrad- 
uate publication with the Alumni 
Monthly. Upon motion of Dr. H. N. 
Cole, '06, a vote was taken that the 
Alumni Monthly be kept separate 
from the undergraduate publication. 

R. W. Thompson, '04, reported 
briefly for the Athletic Committee 
that the financial condition of the 
Athletic Association was practically 
the same as a year ago, but that the 
year had shown unusually good re- 
sults in athletics also that the com- 
mittee appointed by the Trustees had 
today recommended to the Board the 
establishment of an Alumni Athletic 
Association and the continuance in 
office of the Graduate Manager. 

After considerable discussion of the 
problem of the appointment of a 
woman trustee, it was voted that the 
names of Dr. Mary Wolfe, '96, and 
Dr. Mary Bartol Theiss, '94, be sug- 
■ gested to the Trustees for their con- 
sideration for membership on the 
Board as Alumnae Trustees. 

On motion a committee was ap- 
pointed by the President to draw up 
resolutions extending congratulations 
to Dr. William E. Martin and Dr. 
William C. Bartol on the occasion of 
their recent anniversary, and to ex- 
press appreciation for their long and 
faithful service. 

Dr. Bartol, '71, reporting for the 
Alma Mater Song Committee, stated 
that the matter had been placed in the 
hands of the School of Music and a 
book printed with eight Bucknell 
songs from which an .Alma Mater may 
be chosen. 

Upon motion of W. S. Wilcox, '04, 
it was voted that the Dix Reunion 
Plan be adopted for future Commence- 
ments. 

R. W. Thompson, '04, as marshal of 
the alumni for the academic proces- 
sion on Commencement Day, urged 
a full attendance of alumni in the pro- 
cession and reported that good seats 
would be reserved for all those par- 
ticipating. 

C. M. Konkle, '01, urged co-opera- 
tion on the part of individual alumni 



READ IT AND GET BUSY! 



The new constitution of the 
Alumni Association, printed on the 
opposite page, is to be read — and 
put into effect. While the framers 
by no means regard it as a perfect 
document, they do believe that it 
creates the necessary machinery 
for the realization of the thing 
most needed in the Association — 
the enlistment of the alumni 
from all sections of the country in 
its management. 

The factor which is relied upon 
to realize this is the Alumni Coun- 
cil, which is intended to be as large 
and representative as possible. The 
manner of its appointment enables 
a small body of alumni in any dis- 
trict to obtain representation sim- 
ply by forming a local club and ap- 
pointing a delegate. 

The Alumni office will furnish 
address lists for any locality to any 
Bucknellian with pep enough to or- 
ganize such a club, and will, if re- 
quested, send a copy of the model 
constitution for local clubs, which 
was recommended at the June 
meeting of the Association. 

If you live in any district where 
there is no Bucknell Club, or where 
the Bucknell Club is defunct, THIS 
MEANS YOU! 



and that a special expression of 
thanks be made to Dean Anna R. 
Carey and Professor Frank E. Burpee 
for their efforts in entertaining the 
alumni. 

After some discussion of the pos- 
sibility of assistance by the Alumni 
Association in payment of the salary 
of the Graduate Manager, it was voted 
that the matter be referred to the 
Board of Managers to report to the 
Trustees at the earliest possible mo- 
ment what action the Alumni Asso- 
ciation can take in the matter. It was 
reported that the Pittsburgh Alumni 
Club had raised this year one thousand 
dollars for athletics and in addition 
had entertained the basket ball team, 
the base ball team and the Glee club 
during their visit to Pittsburgh. This 
procedure was recommended to the 
other local clubs. Upon motion a ris- 
ing vote of thanks was extended to the 
retiring president, Joseph W. Hender- 
son, '08, for his faithful service during 
his term of office. The Association 
then adjourned. 



and local alumni clubs in keeping the 
university alumni files in good con- 
dition. 

Professor Amos L. Herold on be- 
half of the undergraduates made a 
plea for alumni subscriptions for the 
literary publication to be established 
next fall. 

Roy G. Bostwick, '05, presented the 
proposed new constitution for the 
Alumni Association. After discussion 
in detail, the constitution was adopted 
with an amendment providing for as- 
sociate membership of non-graduate 
faculty members. The election of of- 
ficers resulted in the election by ac- 
clamation of Carl C. Law, '85, Presi- 
dent; Leo. L. Rockwell, '07, Secretary; 
Robert W. Thompson, '04, Leroy T. 
Butler, '97, Joseph W. Henderson, '08, 
Mrs. C. A. Gundy, '90, Dr. Mary Wolfe 
'96, to membership on the Board of 
Managers. 

President Law took the chair and 
upon unanimous demand of the Asso- 
ciation made a brief and character- 
istic inaugural address. 

Upon motion it was voted that the 
appreciation of the alumni be express- 
ed to the University for' its hospitality 



1921 FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 



October 1 Washington & Jefferson 

Washington 

October 8.... Muhlenberg ....Allentown 
October 15 .... Lafayette ..- Lewisburg 
October 22 .... University of West Va. 

Morgantown 

October 29 Catholic University 

Lewisburg 

November 5 .... U. S. Naval Academy 

Annapolis 

November 12 Gettysburg 

Harrisburg 

November 19 Susquehanna 

Lewisburg 

November 24 Dickinson 

Carlisle 



At a meeting of the Board of Man- 
agers immediately after the adjourn- 
ment of the general meeting. Profes- 
sor F. M. Simpson, '95, was re-elected 
Treasurer of the Association for the 
succeeding year. 



Tlie Ne\v Constitution 

Continued from page Two 

ARTICLE X. 
QUORUM. 

Section 1. A majority of the Board 
of Managers at a meeting of that 
Board, five members of the Alumni 
Council at a meeting of the Council, 
and twenty voting members at the 
annual business meeting shall consti- 
tute a quorum. 

ARTICLE XI. 

AMENDMENT. 

Section 1. This Constitution may 
be altered, amended or suspended by a 
vote of two-thirds of the members 
present. 



DO YOU WANT 

THE 

ALUMNI MONTHLY? 

If you did not receive the Monthly 
last year and wish to receive it this 
year, fill out the blank and return it 
to the Alumni office. For annual mem- 
bers of the Association subscription 
price is included in the $2.50 annual 
dues; for life members under the old 
plan subscription is $1.50. 

TO THE ALUMNI OFFICE: 

Please enter me as a subscriber to 
the Alumni Monthly for 1921-1922. I 
will remit subscription price when 
billed. 

Name 

Address 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 
1921 SESSION OF THE ALUMNI INSTITUTE 

OF 
BUCKNELL UNIVERSITY 

October 14tli and 15tli 

ADMISSION: All graduates, matriculates, faculty members, trustees, and friends of the Univer- 
sity admitted to full and unconditional standing. 

COURSES : All courses are informal and elective. Every old friend you meet, and every new one 
you acquire is a text book, and the whole town, the campus, the "willows," Shriner's 
Island, etc., are the class-rooms. 

DEGREES : The degree of B. B. is offered for attendance, regardless of the number of courses 
completed. 

Advanced degrees are offered for distinguished diligence and energy in enhancing the 
success of the occasion. 

TUITION: These opportunities are offered gratis. 

SCHOLARSHIPS : Since there is no tuition, no 3cholarships are necessary. 

PRIZES: A large orange and blue banner is offsred to the local alumni club which makes the 
, highest score in attendance. (The score will be reckoned with due consideration to the 
number present and the distance traveled.) 

A handsome silver loving cup will be awarded to that alumnus who travels the great- 
est distance to attend. 

ARE YOU CASHING THE COUPONS OF YOUR "BUCKNELL BONDS?" Are you, by frequent 
reminiscence, sweetening the joys too hastily tasted during your student days? If not, you are 
neglecting one of your greatest sources of gratification and pleasure. 

Look for future announcements, but in the meantime make your arrangements to be present at the 
greatest alumni gathering ever attempted at Bucknell. Reserve October fourteenth and fifteenth. 



THE ANNIVERSARY. 



Because of the limited space in this 
issue we shall defer publishing- the 
news of Commencement until the Oc- 
tober issue. 



"THE BUCKNELLIAN" WANTS 
YOU 



Our growing Bucknell is about to 
enter upon another active year. 

For true and accurate interpreta- 
tion of its growth and success let "The 
Bucknellian" serve you. 

Special care will be taken in pre- 
paring our mailing list so as to in- 



sure prompt and regular delivery. 

Please send check for $1.50 to Roy 
H. Landis, Business Manager, Lewis- 
burg, Pa. 

(Note — Those alumni who were on 
our mailing list last year will be kept 
on this year unless otherwise request- 
ed.) 



ALUMNI COUNCIL MEETING. 



President Carl C. Law, '8.5, of the 
Alumni Association, wishes to hold an 
organization meeting of the Alumni 
Council in connection with Home-Com- 



ing Day. All local clubs are urged to 
have their delegates appointed early 
enough to notify the Secretary of the 
appointment not later than October 

1st. 



WANTED— PERSONALS! 



What have you been doing this 
summer? What are you intending to 
do this winter? Pull out a post card 
and tell us. We want the biggest 
bunch of alumni personals ever for the 
October issue. 



Bucknell Alumni Monthly 



Vol VI 



October, 1921 



No. 1 



Alumni Home-coming Days 
October 14-15 
Come Home 




THE ENGINEERING BUILDING RISES 



•*>i..«..«..»«»i 



i..«..a»«..«M«»a..aM«- 1 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



Bucknell Alumni Monthly 

EDITOR 

LEO L. ROCKWELL, '07 
LOCAL EDITOR 

HARRY R. WARFEL, '20 

SPORTS EDITORS 

C. E. GLASS, '16 
A. H. HASLAM, '23 
CORRESPONDENTS 

EVELYN STANTON GUNDY, '90 

Lewisburg, Pa. 

MARY BARTOL THEISS, '94 

Muncy, Pa. 

ROMAIN C. HASSRICK, '06 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

ANNE WHITE GALBRAITH, '07 

WiUiamsport, Pa. 
VICTOR B. LUCHSINGER, ex-'08 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

HELEN FORREST HERSHEY, '08 

Chicago, 111. 

ALLAN G. RITTER, '09 

Los Angeles, Calif. 

H. G. FLORIN, '09 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

WEAVER W. PANGBUEN, '10 

New York, N. Y. 

FLORENCE M. ROLLINS, '16 

Altoona, Pa. 

HELEN MOYLE BAILEY, '20 

Cleveland, O. 

ADVERTISING MANAGER 

ROY H. LANDIS, '22 

Published monthly during the college year by the Bucknell University 
Alumni Association. 

Annual Subscription, including Alumni Association dues $2.50 

Annual Subscription to life members under the $5 and $10 plan... .$1.50 
Checks should be made payable to Frank M. Simpson, Treasurer. 

NOW— LET'S GO! 

We're reorganized! Reformed and revivified. The 
Alumni Association, by virtue of the adoption of the new 
constitution last June, is now a modern concern — at least 
so far as organization goes. It remains only to breathe 
life into the Alumni Council by the appointment of live 
men from the various local clubs to serve on it. And it 
is the business of every alumnus to see that this is done. 

We print elsewhere in this issue a list of the existing 
clubs. If you, Mr. Alumnus, reside in the district of one 
of these clubs, you bear the responsibility of seeing that 
a representative of your district is present at the or- 
ganization meeting on Home-coming Day. 

If you are in an unorganized district, it is up to you 
to find some fellow-Bucknellians and organize a club. 
Where two or three or half a dozen Bucknellians reside, 
there should be a Bucknell club. It needs no elabprate 
organization. You need not even adopt the model con- 
stitution we print on page 12, though we believe its adop- 
tion will facilitate your work, since it is designed to co- 
ordinate with the new constitution of the general Asso- 
ciation. 

But, however you do it, get a man to that meeting. 



vances. It would be a wise action for each local club to 
appoint a correspondent and notify the Editor, so that he 
may know on whom to call for news of that district. 



WOiAIEN, TOO 

The tone of the preceding editorial should not mis- 
lead the alumnae into thinking that this is a purely mas- 
culine duty. The Alumnae Clubs also are entitled to rep- 
resentation, and should have their delegates on the ground. 



COME HOME 
October 14-15 Are the Days 

This is the first observance of Home-Coming Time at 
Bucknell. It is hoped that the success of the first attempt 
will warrant its continuation as an annual event. All of 
the progressive colleges of the country are observing it 
with excellent results. There is no other celebration which 
lends itself so readily to the development of the morale 
and esprit de corps of an educational institution. 



THE STAFF 

Every alumnus is a member of the Alumni Monthly 
staff. Many alumni by their yeoman service last year 
were chiefly responsible for making the Monthly deserve 
some of the kind things said about it. However, there 
were some who by location and training were peculiarly 
fitted to make steady contributions of material. The 
Editor feels that they are deserving of whatever of honor 
may attach to their being named as regular members of 
the staff, and takes the liberty of announcing them in 
this issue. 

This staff will doubtless be enlarged as the year a3- 



THANK YOU, DR. FORGEUS 

A real windfall came to the Alumni Office during the 
summer in the shape of nineteen copies of L' Agenda, pre- 
sented by Dr. S. F. Forgeus, '72, of Huntingdon. The col- 
lection includes the very rare '89 and '93 issues. This 
gift furnishes us duplicates for nearly all the years up 
to 1912. 



PAYMENTS MADE TO THE ENDOWMENT AND 
EQUIPMENT FUNDS BY ALUMNI AND FRIENDS 



Amount previously reported $31,889.08 

Kenneth C. Richie, Wellsville, N. Y 20.00 

S. S. Merriman, Trenton, N. J 50.00 

Sarah Merriman Dyer, Trenton, N. J 50.00 

Jeanette B. Shepard, Chester, Pa 10.00 

Charlotte E. Ray, Pittsburgh, Pa 20.00 

Elmer S. Shimer, Milton, Pa 100.00 

Norman E. Henry, Pittsburgh, Pa 10.00 

Emory W. Hunt, Lewisburg, Pa 60.00 

D. M. Sampsell, Winfield, Pa 20.00 

W. Louis Park, Freeville, N. Y 5.00 

Alif Stephens, Lewisburg, Pa 5.00 

J. M. Plannett, Miami, Okla 20.00 

W. E. Thompson, Philadelphia, Pa 100.00 

Verna Whitaker, Millville, N. J : 10.00 

Adda Hayman, Turbotville, Pa 2.00 

John W. Bucher, Lewisburg, Pa 20.00 

John M. Gundy, Lewisburg, Pa 10.00 

Leo L. Rockwell, Lewisburg, Pa 30.00 

Mrs. L. L. Rockwell, Lewisburg, Pa 50.00 

C. J. Eyer, Lewisburg, Pa 15.00 

Anne W. Galbraith, WiUiamsport, Pa 10.00 

Olive E. Moore, Bridgeton, N. J 10.00 

Ray Speare Topham, Germantown, Pa 3.00 

John A. Morris, Soldiers' Home, Calif 20.00 

Mary M. Bubb, Dalmatia, Pa 10.00 

Trotter Bros., Philadelphia, Pa. 50.00 

Coleman J. Harris, Mont Alto, Pa 10.00 

Nora M. Greene, Lewistown, Pa 31.25 

Cecile McCollum, Montrose, Pa 8.00 

Theresa McCollum, Montrose, Pa 5.00 

W. H. Clipman, Mifflinburg, Pa 10.00 

Henry L. Fonda, Milton, Pa 500.00 

Sara Ray Way, Wildwood, N. J 20.00 

Laura Hetzel, Lewisburg, Pa 20.00 

Emma J. Matlack, Lewisburg, Pa 25.00 

Ezra Allen, Collegeville, Pa 25.00 

F. Z. Trax, Meadville, Pa 170.00 

Wm. Van V. Hayes, New York City 20.00 

Fred R. Zug, Carnegie, Pa 20.00 

Margaret Curtis, Montrose, Pa 5.00 

W. R. Roland, Lewisburg, Pa 5.00 

Earl A. Morton, Pittsburgh, Pa 250.00 

H. M. Crist, Swarthmore, Pa 50.00 

Carl A. Metz, Scranton, Pa 8.00 

T. D. Morris, St. Clair, Pa 5.00 

Rush H. Kress, New York City 1,000.00 

D. E. Hottenstein, Millersburg, Pa 25.00 

Mary E. Grove, West Milton, Pa 5.00 

Mrs. Leroy Stephens, Lewisburg, Pa 5.00 

Mrs. Earl J. Belcher, Westfield, N. J : 5.00 

Bina E. Carr, Pittsburgh, Pa 6.00 

O. K. Pellman, Mifflinburg, Pa 50.00 

George A. Marr, Swarthmore, Pa 40.00 

W. L. Donehower, Lewisburg, Pa 5.00 

George A. Irland, Lewisburg, Pa 15.00 

William M. Woodward, McKeesport, Pa. 200.00 

E. P. Bertin, WiUiamsport, Pa 2.00 

Harland A. Trax, Brooklyn, N. Y 100.00 

Inez E. Olds, Haddonfield, N. J 20.00 

LaMont R. Rentz, Newark, N. J 25.00 

Total to Sept. 14, 1921 $35,289.33 

It is very gratifying to the Treasurer to have sub- 
scribers pay their installments without being asked, but 
if they are not paid within reasonable time, reminders 
will be sent. Please give heed to the reminders, since 

the Trustees are pressing ahead with necessary improve- 
ments, depending upon the subscription list for funds. 

Alumni who have not yet subscribed are urged to do so 
at once. If we cannot make it unanimous, let us at least 
have a strong ma.iority co-operating in the great forward 
movement of our University. 

Please send subscriptions and checks direct to John 
T. Judd, Treasurer. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



t 



About the Hill 



COLLEGE OPENS 

The seventy-second session of the University opened 
at noon, September 14th, with all departments crowded. 
The freshman class is one of the largest on record, num- 
bering- two hundred and seventy-one. Every room in the 
men's dormitories and at the Women's College is taken. 
The total registration surpasses that of last year by twen- 
ty-eight. 

The college faculty has been increased by the ap- 
pointment of a number of new professors and instruc- 
tors. 0. S. Groner, a graduate of Michigan Agricultural 
College, Michigan State Normal College, and the Uni- 
versity of Michigan, with graduate work of the University 
of Chicago, and with college teaching experience at Grand 
Island College and Ottawa University, and at Transyl- 
vania College, where he has been professor of Chemis- 
try since 1918, will be the new assistant professor of chem- 
istry. Owen G. Groves, a graduate of Hamilton 
College, with graduate work at Columbia and teaching 
experience at Hamilton, has accepted the associate pro- 
fessorship of English. R. F. Howes, who received his 
baccalaureate degree at Clark College, his Master of Arts 
at Stanford, his LL.B. from the law school of Stetson 
University, comes from a position on the faculty of De 
Pauw University as assistant professor of Economics and 
Political Science. Arthur St. Clair Sloan, a graduate of 
Denison and of Rochester Seminary, with graduate work 
at Ohio State University, and with teaching experience at 
Wooster College and Ohio State University, has accepted 
the assistant professorship of Romance Languages. Mr. 
Sloan's long residence in Mexico adds to his qualifications 
for this position. He will carry the advanced work in 
Spanish. Harry R. Warfel, a Bucknell graduate of the 
class of 1920, who taught last year at St. John's Academy, 
Manlius, N. Y., and spent the summer at Columbia, comes 
as instructor in English, and Harold Shaffer, a Bucknell 
graduate of the class of 1913, with several years of engi- 
neering experience, comes as instructor in Electrical En- 
gineering. Miss Novello Jones, a graduate of Drexel In- 
stitute, with teaching experience at Millersville State Nor- 
mal School, is the new instructor in sewing. 

The School of Music faculty will have several new 
members. Adrian Wynnobel, of The Hague, Holland, 
takes Professor Mortimer Howard's position in Voice. 
Mr. Wynnobel has specialized in the musical work of the 
so-called "Old School" covering old and new classics, ora- 
torio, and opera. He has a voice of exceptional timbre and 
comes highly recommended as a teacher. Miss Grace 
Jenkins, soprano, who so ably assisted at the time of 
Professor Howard's illness, has consented to accept a per- 
manent position in the Voice Department. Miss Mar- 
guerite Hartman, who in addition to her work at Bucknell, 
has studied with Warren Shaw, of Philadelphia, will also 
instruct in Voice. Miss Helen Segner, a graduate of Wil- 
son College who had her musical education at Peabody 
Institute, is the new instructor in Piano to take the place 
of Mrs. David Moyer, who will discontinue instructing this 
year. 

Miss Eliza Martin, a Bucknell graduate of the class 
of 1900, who has taught at Stetson University and more 
recently in the local High school, enters the library as as- 
sistant librarian. She prepared for her new work this 
summer at the New York State Library School, at Al- 
bany. 

By action of the faculty, three new music courses were 
added to the coUeg-e curriculum this fall. A new course in 
Vocational Psychology to be conducted by Dean Carey will 
also be g-iven. 

The chemical laboratory, on which work has been 
progressing- all summer, is now ready for occupancy. The 
walls of the engineering building are rising rapidly so that 
it will be under roof before cold weather. A gn^eat many 
minor improvements have been made about the campus. 
A new $10,000 boilei-, capable of heating the entire plant, 
was installed at the power house. The kitchens at the 
Women's College were modernized and many smaller re- 
pairs made at Main College, including the installation of 
new bulletin boards and the renovation of the Registrar's 
Office. 



HOMECOMING APPROACHES 

Plans and preparations for the Alumni Homecoming 
Days, which will be observed on the 14th and 15th of Oc- 
tober, are progressing rapidly. The problem of handling 
the immense crowd which is expected to be on hand is a 
troublesome one, for local accommodations are sure to be 
taxed to the limit. Bucknellians from every section are 
expressing their intention of getting back for the cele- 
bration. In addition to this Lafayette is sending out a 
special appeal to her sons, urging them to be in the stands 
to support their team in the Bucknell-Lafayette game on 
the fifteenth. Also, the Lewisburg Rotary Club is plan- 
ning to entertain the Rotarians from fifty-one cities and 
towns, from Washington, D. C, to Scranton, and from Al- 
toona to Atlantic City. 

All of the fraternities will arrange to take care of the 
greatest possible number of returning brothers. The town 
alumni and friends also stand ready to help out where- 
ever possible. The Delmar Inn, Steininger's Cafe, and the 
College Inn will make provisions for a large number of 
visitors, and it is hopd that the Cameron House will be 
open in time to help meet the demand for rooms and 
meals. 

The program which has been arranged is very simple. 
Nothing has been planned which might interfere with the 
personal desires of the returning- alumni. The entire day 
on Friday and all of Saturday morning may be devoted to 
visiting classes or friends, getting acquainted with the 
undergraduates, or to any other occupations which happen 
to appeal to individual fancies. On Friday night a big 
mass-meeting will be held in Commencement Hall. Noth- 
ing will be left undone to make it a roaring success. 
Former Bucknell football captains and cheer leaders will 
be called upon to add "pep" to the program. The band 
and the musical clubs will furnish plenty of melody. The 
feature event will be staged on Saturday afternoon, when 
Bucknell and Lafayette meet on Tustin Field in the annual 
football clash. This will be the biggest treat of its kind 
since the old days of the Penn State-Bucknell encounters. 
Everybody is expected to be in the stands to lend his voice 
to the encouragement of the team. 

The seating capacity of the athletic field will be in- 
creased to the limit. Every effort will be made to seat 
comfortably all who attend. Present indications are that 
the demand will be far in excess of anything ever ex- 
perienced here. Instructions for making advance reser- 
vations will be found in another part of this issue. 



COLLEGE WOMEN WILL RECEIVE ON HOME- 
COMING DAY 

The women of the college will be at home to alumni, 
alumnae and friends on October fifteenth, from five to six. 
This after-the-game reception is intended to give oppor- 
tunity to these groups to become acquainted with the 
changes made at Women's College and with the Bucknell 
women of today. Dean Anna R. Carey is very anxious 
that as many Bucknellians as possible visit the Women's 
College at this time, so that the reception may serve as a 
real reunion. 



4 BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 

Undergraduate Activities 



•••-•••••••-•••I 



•■•"•»•"• -•-•"•••••'M^ 



THE TEAM LOOKS GOOD 

The Bucknell coaches have put in an arduous prelim- 
inary period of sorting, sifting-, and changing material in 
an effort to present the best possible team for the initial 
game of the season, against Washington & Jefferson Col- 
lege, on October the first. Despite their strenuous efforts, 
an entirely satisfactory solution of the problem of selec- 
tion has not yet been reached. 

Seven veterans of last year's eleven have returned, 
and with one exception are showing more dash than ever. 
It looks fairly certain that their names will be found in the 
varsity line-up, at least for the early season games. J. M. 
Reed, who took care of a guard position last year, has 
been shifted to end, and has conclusively proved himself 
the man for the job. H. O. Dayhoff and W. J. Hall, both 
first-line substitutes last year, have taken a long lead on 
their competitors for the quarterback and halfback berths. 
H. C. McGraw, also a sub last year, has developed into a 
fine tackle, the best in view at present, but he will be hard 
pressed by F. D. Jemison, who lost out on account of an 
injury last year. Of the new candidates several look very 
promising as future varsity material, but only two, War- 
ren Kopp, flashy halfback of Willia'msport High School, 
and Leroy Byham, big lineman from Kane High School, 
have reached the point where^ they can seriously be con- 
sidered as starters in the firs't few games. Accordingly, 
the most likely line-up seems at present to be V. A. Bihl, 
center; D. W. Morrett and Leroy Byham, guards; F. W. 
Homan, Jr., and H. C. McGraw, tackles; A. F. Julian and 
J. M. Reed, ends; H. 0. Dayhoff, quarterback; Captain A. 
C. Bowser, fullback; and J. W. Hall and Warren Kopp, 
halfbacks. It would not be surprising, however, if the 
names of E. P. Tomkins, E. A. Gdaniec, J. W. Foster, John 
Durovick, F. D. Jemison, Donald Johnson, George Bel- 
lack, or of several other promising men, should appear 
instead of those above mentioned. 

"Tony" Wilsbach, who played a sterling game at- 
halfback last year, returned to college at the opening, but 
became discouraged because of scholastic difficulties and 
poor' physical condition and left to enter Gettysburg. 

Harold Drum, meteoric star of the champion North 
High School team of Syracuse, N. Y., was making splendid 
progress toward a varsity berth, until he was put on the 
hospital list with a fractured lower jaw, which he received 
while backing up the line, during a scrimmage the second 
week of practice. 

Big "Bill" Edgar, former Kiski and University of 
Pittsburgh star, has entered Bucknell, and is taking his 
exercise in moleskins, but is ineligible for the team this 
year, on account of the one-year rule. 

It is very evident that this year's schedule of games 
is a big order, and especially the first month's engage- 
ments. W. & J. on the first of October, followed two 
weeks later by Lafayette and University of West Virginia, 
on successive week ends, with Muhlenberg between them, 
offers very little encouragement to those who are 
looking for a soft snap. Catholic University, Navy, Get- 
tysburg, Susquehanna, and Dickinson, comprising the rest 
of the football schedule, round out one of the most difficult 
series of contests ever attempted by the Orange and Blue. 

The feature game of the season will take place on the 
fifteenth of October, with Lafayette as the opponent. An- 
nual football relations were opened with the Easton insti- 
tution last year. The contest went to Lafayette after the 
most thrilling nip-and-tuck battle which has been seen on 
Marsh Field in decades. This will also be the first ap- 
pearance of Lafayette on Tustin Field, at Lewisburg, since 
1899. A record-breaking crowd is expected. The seat- 
ing capacity of the stands is being doubled in order to 
meet the demand indicated by the advance requests for 
reservations. 



NEWCOMB HELPS COACH 

Boyd L. Newcomb, '18, of Philadelphia, has been added 
to the Orange and Blue coaching staff. While a member 
of the Bucknell team he was rated one of the best college 
tackles in the game. After graduation he was a member 
of the League Island Marines team, of which he was cap- 
tain. His special duties at Bucknell will be individual 
instruction of the linemen, and scouting. 



A GLEE CLUB REQUEST 

Bucknell alumni will be interested in the announce- 
ment that the Glee Club of the University has already 
begun active work, so far as rehearsals and weeding out 
of incompetents is concerned. In the first place, work was 
begun early, with a larger number of men on hand than 
in any previous year. Several of these were new men with 
real talent, so that older members will be forced to 
hustle to hang on to their positions. With the increasing 
turn-out comes increased competition, with the picked men 
representing the best of the organization. All of the men 
have not been finally chosen as yet, and with several in- 
teresting trips in the offing, rivalry is keen. 

Although insofar as the musical end of the organiza- 
tion is concerned prospects are bright, the manager's end 
is not quite so promising. Because of a very unusual 
combination of circumstances the work was begun on this 
end about a month late, and this handicap has persisted. 
To ensure smooth work, a trip must be signed up several 
weeks before the actual trip is made. This is the purpose 
of this letter to the alumni. 

Alumni are urged to do all in their power to speed 
up the manager's work, by notifying him of towns in 
which they think it possible for him to secure dates. With 
the names of these towns should be sent the names of 
persons who would be responsible for handling the local 
end of the concert, and the dates on which it would be 
preferred to have the club. Any help of this sort will be 
of great value to the manager and would be very much 
appreciated by him and by the club. 

Communications should be addressed to Ralph Hartz, 
manager of the club, or to Dan M. Villinger, assistant 
manager, Bucknell University, Lewisburg, Pa. 



THE NEW CLASS OFFICERS 

The classes elected officers as usual on the Friday 
following the opening of college. The elections resulted 
as follows: 

Senior class — President, Finley Keech, of Netcong, N. 
J.; Vice President, S. Perry Rogers, of Jeffersonville, Pa.; 
Secretary, Miss Ethel Richardson, of Reading, Pa.; Treas- 
urer, Herman E. Wiant, of Huntingdon Mills, Pa. Junior 
Class — President, Nevin H. Grieb, Tylersville, Pa.; Vice 
President, Robert J. Haberstroh, Scranton, Pa.; Secretary, 
Miss Mary G. Heilman, of Oakmont, Pa.; Treasurer, 
Eugene Biddle, of Muncy, Pa. L' Agenda Editor, Harold 
C. McGraw, of Philadelphia, Pa. Sophomore Class — Pres- 
ident, Paul N. Walker, of Verona, Pa.; Vice President, 
Thomas I. Horan, of Locust Gap, Pa.; Secretary, Miss M. 
Lillian Edmunds, of Crafton, Pa.; Treasurer, Willis D. 
Conn, of Point Marion, Pa. Freshman Class — President, 
Randall L. Davis, of Cleveland, O.; Vice President, Ronald 
B. Yothers, of Pitcairn, Pa.; Secretary, Miss Mary A. 
Porter, of Oil City, Pa.; Treasurer, Robert H. MacBride, 
of Paterson, N. J. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



♦%*!•••"••••"•"•••••■•"•■■•■••"••••••' 



Alumni Organizations 



•>••••••••»••••-•"••••-••-•'■ 



..•««..«..a..«..«»*»*««..«..«..t..it% 



THE LOCAL CLUBS 

For the benefit of the new alumni 
who have settled in the district of any 
Bucknell Alumni Club, we publish be- 
low a list of local clubs with names 
and addresses of officers: 

The Alumni Club of Philadelphia 

President — Dr. Samuel Bolton, '85, 
4701 Leiper St. 

Secretary — Louis W. Robey, Esq., 
'04, 918 Stephen Girard Bldg-. 
The Alumni Club of New York City 

President— Rush H. Kress, '00, 225 
W. 86th St. 

Secretary — Creighton M. Konkle, 
'01, 48 E. Hawthorne Ave., East Or- 
ange, N. J. 

The Alumni Club of Pittsburgh 

President— E. P. Griffiths, Esq., '04, 
1015 Union Bank Bldg. 

Secretary — Helge Florin, 387 Union 
Arcade. 

The Alumni Club of Chicago 

President — W. C. MacNaul, '90, 
6510 Ellis Ave. 

Secretary— G. T. Keech, c|o The 
Blackwood, 4514 Clarendon Ave. 
The Alumni Club of Northeastern 
Pennsylvania 

President — James P. Harris^ Esq., 
'32, 609 Coal Exchange Bldg., Wilkes- 
Barre. 

Secretary — Sidney Grabowski, Esq., 
'14, 417 Connell Bldg., Scranton. 

The Alumni Club of Harrisburg 

President — J. A. Tyson, '11, Kunkle 
Bldg. 

Secretary— W. C. Sprout, '08, c]o 
The Patriot, Harrisburg. 

The Alumni Club of Washington 

President — Henry H. Bliss, Esq., 
'70, Ouray Bldg. 

Secretary- Frank W. Tilley, '98, 
1311 21st St., N. W. 
The Alumni Club of Central Penn- 
sylvania 

President — Judge Thomas J. Bald- 
ridge, ex-'95, Hollidaysburg. 

Secretary — Rev. S. F. Forgeus, '72, 
D. D., Huntingdon. 
The Alumni Club of Williamsport 

President — Oliver J. Decker, Esq., 
'99, Trust Bldg. 

Secretary- Anne Galbraith, '07, 965 
High St. 

The Alumni Club of Lewisburg 

President— Leroy T. Butler, '97, 
Lewisburg. 

Secretary — Claire G. Groover, '15, 
Lewisburg. 

The Alumni Club of Sunbury 

President — George Edward Deppen, 
Esq., '94, Sunbury. 

Secretary — Cullen Frazer Shipman, 
Esq., '99, Sunbury. 

The Alumni Club of California 

President — Allan G. Ritter, Esq., 
'09, 1012 Black Bldg., Los Angeles. 

Secretary — Roy J. Farr, Esq., '08, 
716 Ferguson Bldg., Los Angeles. 
The Alumni Club of China 

President — Charles Way Harvey, 
'00. 20 Museum Road, Shanghai. 

Secretary — Rev, Lewis C. Hylbert, 
.'05, Ningpo. 



The Hazleton Alumni Club 

President — Rev. Joseph H. Cooke, 
'98, Hazleton. 

Secretary — Nora Dodson, '11, 90 N. 
Laurel St. 

The Wilmington Alumni Club 

President — Leslie W. Stout, '13, c|o 
Industrial Trust Co. 

Secretary — Ruth Barthold, '17, cjo 
High School. 

The Cleveland Alumni Club 

President— Ralph R. Snow, '94, 
1024 B. of L. E. Bldg. 

Secretary — Helen Moyle Bailey, '20 
1920 E. 84th St. 

The Pittsburgh Alumnae Club 

President — Mrs. John B. Dumont, 
Jr., Inst. '00, 312 Frederick Ave., Se- 
wickley. Pa. 

Secretary — Bina Carr, 5511 Howe 
St. 

Treasurer — Mrs. Mabel Browning 
Pogue, Mus. '01, 132 Virginia Ave., 
Aspinnall, Pa. 

The Philadelphia Alumnae Club 

President— Margaret Groff, '04, 19 
W. Union St., West Chester. 

Secretary — Mrs. Carrie McCaskie 
Wise, '06, 123 Mill Road, Ashbourne. 
The Lewisburg Alumnae Club 

President — Mrs. Margaret Stough- 
ton Meyer, '90, Lewisburg. 

Secretary — Mrs. Fanny Getz Brown 
Mus. '06, Lewisburg. 



"<?)- 



MORE REUNION CLASSES UN- 
DER THE DIX PLAN 

The Dix plan for Commencement 
reunion classes, which was adopted by 
the Alumni Association last June, 
goes into effect this year. In order to 
avoid having any class miss its re- 
union, a combination with the old plan 
will be necessary for the next two 
years, so that an unusually large num- 
ber of classes will be scheduled for 
get-togethers this spring. 

The classes which will hold reunions 
under the old plan are: '62, '72, '82, 
'92, '97, '02, '07, '12, '17. Those des- 
ignated under the Dix plan are: '69, 
'70, and '71; '88, '89, '90 and '91; '08, 
'09, '10 and '21. 



-®- 



CHICAGO PICNIC 

Dear Professor Rockwell: 

The Chicago Bucknell Alumni Club 
had a picnic on the eleventh of June. 

We chose Jackson Park, the World's 
Fair ground, because nearly all of the 
alumni lived in that part of the city, 
and we felt that we made a wise 
choice, for thirty-two of us were 
there — twenty-t\vo "grown-ups" and 
ten children. Nine of the ten were 
boys. Jay Wolfe took some pictures 
and promised to send you one of th§ 
future Bucknellians. 



We had a fine time. Everyone en- 
joyed it so much that we plan to have 
another picnic before the end of the 
summer. 

We hope that these picnics will 
bring out all of the Chicago Alumni 
so that we shall get acquainted. Then 
next winter when we have our ban- 
quets they will come. 

I am very sincerely, 

Helen Forrest Hershey. 



-®- 



FOOTBALL RESERVATIONS 

If you desire reserved seats for the 
Lafayette - Bucknell football game, 
please mail the following blank to C. 
E. Glass, Graduate Manager, Lewis- 
burg, Pa. The price of each seat, in- 
cluding general admission, is $1.50. 
Any number of seats can be secured 
by each alumnus. Twelve cents for 
return registered postage, in addition 
to the price of the tickets ordered, 
must accompany every request for 
reservations. 

The request of the alumni will be 
given preference, provided they are 
filed within a reasonable time. 
Cut Here 



Enclosed find $ for 

reserved seats, at the Lafayette-Buck- 
nell Football Game, October 15, ,at 3 
P. M. 



Enclose twelve cents for return post- 
age. 



-{i>- 



LEWISBURG ALUMNAE 

ANNOUNCE PROGRAM 

The Lewisburg Alumnae Club is 
announcing an exceptionally interest- 
ing program for the coming year. The 
subject in general will treat of the 
effects of the Great War upon the 
women of Europe, showing the gains 
in suffrage, professional activities and 
practical legislation. Besides the 
reading of papers there will be in- 
troduced songs and instrumental sel- 
ections appropriate to the countries 
under consideration. 

In accordance with the change from 
monthly to bi-monthly meetings, the 
programs will be given on the evening 
of the second Tuesday of the months 
of October, December, February and 
April. Programs are now in the 
hands of the printer and will be ready 
for distribution within a few days. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



*^^tm%K9^9*.^**%,.t-M"»"m-»-9"»''»^»"*"»"*''*"»-»"»"»"*-*-*''9*-*-*"*-*'»9-*''*'^"* " * " * " * " * " 



In the Public Eye 



I 



♦I* ••■••"••••-( 



CULLEN CAIN PAYS "MATTY" 
HIGH TRIBUTE 

"Big Six" is the topic to which Cul- 
len Cain, special sports writer for the 
Philadelphia Public Ledger devoted 
his column in the issue of August 3rd. 
From the long, appreciative account 
of "Matty's" career we clip the fol- 
lowing characteristic extracts: 

"Christy Mathewson has pitched 
many a close game in his day and won 
most of them because he had coolness 
and courage as well as skill. He is in 
the closest of all games now up at 
Saranac Lake, in the Adirondacks, 
and is just swinging into the thir- 
teenth inning with tuberculosis, and 
the score is deadlocked still. 

"So the other day I went to Saranac 
Lake to try to find out something of 
the real condition of baseball's old 
idol and to carry to him some friendly 
word from fandom, and bring back 
some personal message from Christy 
to those who remember and admire 
him still. 

"I tried to tell Mathewson some- 
thing of what the fans still felt for 
him. I wanted him to know and to 
feel that with him it was not out of 
sight, out of mind. I knew that thou- 
sands of old and young boys all over 
the land were asking about him and 
hoping that he would win back his 
health. And when I muttered to him 
about these very deep and fine things 
he seemed to be much affected for a 
moment. Then his voice was strong 
and earnest when he said: "Tell them 
that, I appreciate their remembrance 
very much and that I send back greet- 
ings. Yes; and tell them that I am 
glad they are for me and that it will 
surely help." 

"If Matty's patience holds out, if 
he keeps his courage and his hope and 
his faith, he has an even chance to 
win. Well, he never lost them in any 
game of life before, and I cannot be- 
lieve he will lose them now, even 
though the silent hills and the distant 
skies are the only spectators at his 
hardest game. 

"But wait! He has one ally on his 
side who has never failed him through 
the heavy year — his wife. Mrs. Math- 
ewson is with him all the time, and no 
one but Matty can know how much 
she has helped him up there in the 
hills. 

"It is to be doubted if any man who 
ever wore spiked shoes or owned a 
team has reached Christy Mathew- 
son's peculiar place in the base ball 
world. The peer of any of them in 
skill and in success, he had other qual- 
ities. He had a long span of great- 
ness as a pitcher. Twice his arm 
failed him and twice he called on his 
head for aid, and returned to the hill 
more effective than he had been be- 
fore. Such a man is hard to beat in 
any game. 

"But Matty's highest and most en- 
during place in base ball was won by 
his qualities of mind. He was a credit 
to the game. It did much for him and 
he did something for it in return. He 
was a high class base ball man. He 
was not alone clean and honest him- 



self, he had enough character to im- 
print these qualities upon the game. 
The public got a higher and better 
opinion of base ball because of Mattj'. 
What influence he had jupon other 
players is merely conjecture, but sure- 
ly it was very great. 

"Probably more has been written in 
praise of Matty than any other play- 
er. But, ty my soul, I believe the 
highest praise of all was reserved for 
the last. It came from the lips of his 
doctor. 'He has fought a great fight' 
said the medical man. 'He is gener- 
ally brave and pleasant and hopeful 
and patient. His friends who have 
placed him so high could weii feel 
proud of him if they knew what he 
has been through and how well he has 
borne the bi-unt. Do not say he 'still' 
has a chance, just say he has a chance. 
He has never given up anywhere 
along the hard, dark, way. Those of 
us who have come to know him up 
here have gro%\Ti very fond of Math- 
ewson, the man whom we never knew 
as the hero. And we are proud to 
have him, and, like him, we refuse to 
even discuss or consider the possibil- 
ity of defeat." 



THE POLITICAL POT BOILS 

The primary election, September 20, 
saw a number of hot contests waged 
by Bucknell alumni. 

Judge Thomas A. Baldridge, ex-'9.5, 
Blair county, "won the re-nomination 
on the Republican ticket in a whirl- 
wind campaigTi which aroused the 
county as a judicial election had never 
done before. Judge Baldridge was 
pitted against a strong man in Dis- 
trict Attorney Marion Patterson, but 
at the final test swept the county by 
a large majority. Several Bucknell- 
ians were in a monster automobile 
parade planned as a demonstration for 
Judge Baldridge on the night before 
the primaries. 

The contest of chief interest from a 
local view-point was that for the nom- 
ination for the judgeship of the Un- 
ion-Snyder district, in which three 
Bucknellians figured: Judge Albert 
W. Johnson, '96; Andrew A. Leiser, 
'69, and Harry A. Coryell, '05. 

■Judge Johnson was a candidate for 
re-nomination on the Republican tic- 
ket and was opposed by Mr. Coryell 
and Mr. Potter, of Selinsgrove. After 
a hot campaign Judge Johnson lost by 
a scant hundred votes, largely because 
of a strong local patriotism in Snyder 
county which found expression in the 
desire that after sixty-six years in 
which Union county men had held the 
olfice a Snyder county man should be 
named. Mr. Leiser was unopposed 
on the Democratic ticket. 

In another close and interesting 
camnaign Lincoln S. Walter, '86, of 
Mount Carmel, lost by a narrow mar- 
gin to Albert Lloyd in the Northum- 
berland judicial campaign. 

Despite a vigorous campaign Ar- 
thur A. Smith, '98, of Williamsport, 
failed to carry the county against 
Judge Harvey Whitehead. 



BUCKNELL AT THE NORTHERN 
BAPTIST CONVENTION 

As usual, Bucknellians were promi- 
nent at the annual meeting of the 
Northern Baptist Convention, held at 
Des Moines in June. 

Director Ernest L. Tustin, '84, Pres- 
ident of the convention, opened its 
session with an address of which "The 
Baptist" says: 

"It struck a responsive chord of 
thought and feeling in the assembly, 
as' indicated by frequent and general 
applause. Calling attention to the 
great wave of extravagance in dress 
and conduct, Mr. Tustin stated that 
the gi'eat fundamental need through- 
out our land is the personal realiza- 
tion of a religious life. He sounded 
a call for Christian education, and 
personal devotion." 

During the later sessions of the con- 
vention, Mr. Tustin, who for some 
months had been in ill health, broke 
down under the strain, so that imme- 
diately after the close of the assem- 
bly he was compelled to take a vaca- 
tion of several weeks before returning 
to his duties as Director of Public 
Welfare in Philadelphia. 

Dr. H. F. Stilwell, '81, General Su- 
perintendent of the Department of 
Evangelism, presided at the fourth 
Evangelistic Conference, held on the 
Monday and Tuesday preceding the 
convention. Later, during the ses- 
sions of the convention proper, Dr. 
Stilwell came in for flattering men- 
tion in the report on evangelism, in 
which the Rev. F. E. Taylor, who pre- 
sented the report, after stating that 
the preceding year had been probably 
the greatest on evangelism in the his- 
tory of the convention, said: "For 
this increased fruitage we are deeply 
indebted to the Department of Evan- 
gelism, the work and worth of whose 
General Superintendent, Dr. H. F. 
Stilwell, we here whole-heartedly com- 
mend." 

Dr. Frank M. Goodchild, '84, was 
the center of interest on two distinct 
occasions. In the Fundamentals Con- 
•ference preceding the convention, he 
as chairman of the executive commit- 
tee of the movement, presented a 
statement of doctrine and moved its 
adoption, precipitating one of the hot- 
test debates of the entire session. 
Later, he presented the much discuss- 
ed and eagerly awaited report of the 
committee appointed to investigate 
the Baptist schools and colleges. 

Dr. Samuel Zane Batten, '85, pre- 
sented the report on social seiwice, 
which was a characteristically ener- 
getic statement of the social duties of 
the church. 

President Emory W. Hunt was sel- 
ected for a task for which his felicity 
of phrase and geniality of manner 
peculiarly fitted him — that of intro- 
ducing to the convention the European 
Baptist leaders who were guests of 
the convention. Dr. Hunt was, of 
course, acquainted with them from 
his European mission last summer. 

The session of the Publication So- 
cietv opened with an appreciation of 
the "late Dr. A. J. Rowland, '62, for 
many vears General Secretary of the 
Society. ' 



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"•••••■•"•"•••••••" 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



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Alumni Activities 



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DR. HILL ABROAD 

Dr. David Jayne Hill, '74, passed 
the summer on the Continent, study- 
ing conditions in the various countries 
touched by the war. After a stay in 
France, in the course of which he vis- 
ited the battle-fields, he entered Ger- 
many by way of Coblenz, where he 
was the gnest of General Allen. Later 
he proceeded to Berlin for the pur- 
pose of studying- thoroughly business 
and economic conditions in Germany. 

Persistent rumors that he was to be 
the appointee of President Harding to 
the ambassadorship at Berlin followed 
him, despite his statement that the 
trip was of a purely business nature. 

His original plan was, after a tour 
of Switzerland, to return to Paris in 
the autumn. 



-<S>- 



DR. YOUNGKEN HAS 

NEW OFFICE 

Dr. Heber W. Youngken, '09, was 
elected chairman of the Scientific Sec- 
tion of the American Pharmaceutical 
Association at its sixty-ninth meeting 
in New Orleans, La., Sept. 5-9. He 
has also been honored by the Phila- 
delphia College of Pharmacy and 
Science in having been elected Direc- 
tor of the recently acquired Botanical 
Gardens of the college at Glenolden, 
Pa. 



-^ 



MEMORIAL TO BE 

ESTABLISHED TO 

DR. PHILIPS 

Alumni of West Chester State Nor- 
mal School plan to establish a $50,000 
scholarshiD fund as a memorial to the 
late Dr. George M. Philips, for long 
years principal of the Normal School. 

Pursuant to a resolution adopted by 
the Alumni Association a committee 
appointed for that purpose met re- 
cently and decided on this form of 
memorial as best calculated to express 
the feeling which calls forth the trib- 
ute. The sum will be raised by a can- 
vass among the alumni for individual 
contributions of $10. A considerable 
sum has already been pledged. 

In the front room of the main build- 
ing at the Normal School is a large 
bronze tablet to the memory of Dr. 
Phillips presented by the class of 1920. 
There is a bas-relief in the reception 
room and a large photograph in the 
main office. 



-^J^ 



ALUMNI ON STATE 

PARK COMMITTEES 

Four alumni are named on the com- 
mittees appointed to act on the es- 
tablishment of parks in the state for- 
est reserves. Albert W. Johnson, '96, 
G. W. Wagenseller, '92, and W. G. 
Murdock, ex-'04, are members of the 
committee on the location of the 
Joyce Kilmer Park, and Professor 
Nelson F. Davis, '95, of that named to 
select the MacConnell Narrows Park. 



BULLARD A CAPTAIN 

Hugh M. Bullard, '13, was recently 
promoted to a captaincy in the Med- 
ical Corps, and transferred to the sta- 
tion hospital at Camp Dix. 



DR. BATTEN TO EUROPE 

Dr. Samuel Zane Batten, social edu- 
cation secretary for the American 
Baptist Publication Society, sailed in 
Aug'ust for Europe, where he studied 
post-war social conditions, especially 
in Czecho-Slovakia. 

Dr. Batten's address on the Inter- 
church World Movement, which was 
delivered before the American Sociol- 
ogical Society, has been published by 
the University of Chicago Press. 



^ 

FOLLMER REPRESENTS 

ROTARIANS ABROAD 

Frederick V. Follmer, '06, who has 
been secretary of the Milton Rotary 
club since its organization, was hon- 
ored by the Rotarians with the ap- 
pointment as their delegate to the 
International Convention at Edin- 
burgh this summer. 

Mr. Follmer was accompanied by 
his bride, and the newly-weds were 
given a great send-off by their Milton 
friends. Headed by the Milton Man- 
ufacturing Company band, the Rotar- 
ians and their wives marched to the 
Follmer home and placing Mr. and 
Mrs. Follmer at their head escorted 
them to the station, where they pulled 
out amid a shower of confetti and 
good wishes. 



PRESIDENT EVANS BANQUETED 

A feature of the Commencement at 
Crozer Seminary was the banquet 
tendered President Milton G. Evans, 
'82, in recognition of his thirty-one 
years of teaching at the Seminary and 
his twelve years in the presidency. 
Many expressions of appreciation for 
his faithful and consecrated service 
were made on this occasion. 



-<s>- 



DIRECTOR TUSTIN 

BACK AT WORK 

Director of Public Welfare Ernest 
L. Tustin, '84, who, after being in ill 
health for some months, suffered a 
break down at the Northern Baptist 
Convention at Des Moines, passed sev- 
eral weeks recuperating at Watkins' 
Glen and Atlantic City, and returned 
to his duties in very greatly improv- 
ed condition. 



-^J- 



LEABER SAILS FOR CHINA 

Chester Leaber, '19, who is in the 
foreign department of a large New 
York house, for which he has been 
stationed in London and Panama, was 
home during the summer on a brief 
vacation prior to sailing for China, 
where he will be located for the next 
five years. 



ADE CAPTAINS 

WILLIAMSPORT 

COMPANY 

Lester K. Ade, '21, has been ap- 
pointed to the captaincy of Company 
K, 109th Pennsylvania Guard Infantry. 
Mr. Ade is a grammar school prin- 
cipal in Williamsport. He is fitted 
for his new duties by a long experi- 
ence in the National Guard and by 
field service as a captain in Siberia. 



WHITEHOUSE GOES 

TO OKLAHOMA 

Paul E. Whitehouse, '98, a former 
member of the Bucknell faculty, has 
been invited to accept a position as 
Assistant Professor of Modern Lan- 
guages at the University of Okla- 
homa. This invitation adds one more 
to the increasing number of Bucknell 
men in university education in the 
Middle West. 

The appointment came entirely 
without solicitation on the part of Mr. 
Whitehouse, and he feels that he is 
indebted for the position to the rec- 
ommendation of Bucknell friends, to 
whom he wishes to express his grati- 
tude. 

«> 



MISS KROMER TO JAPAN 

IN Y WORK 

Miss Arial Kromer, '17, spent a 
brief vacation in July with her par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. John A. Kromer, 
of Milton, prior to sailing for Japan, 
under appointment as secretary in the 
executive office of the American Y. W. 
C. A. in Tokyo. Miss Kromer expects 
to spend three years in Japan. 

® : 

DR. WEST COMES TO LEWISBURG 

Dr. Raymond M. West, '89, who last 
spring resigned his position as Direc- 
tor of the Life Work Department of 
the Northern Baptist Convention, ac- 
cepted the unanimous call of the Lew- 
isburg Baptist church to the pastorate 
made vacant last June by the resig- 
nation of Rev. W. J. Peacock, and be- 
gan his duties on the new field Sep- 
tember first. 

Dr. West attacked his task in char- 
acteristically vigorous fashion; and his 
genius in dealing with young people, 
his known courage and administrative 
ability, and the whole hearted support 
he has met, promise to make his pas- 
torate notable in the history of the 
local church. 



SMALL TOWN STUFF 

The world at large will not be 
interested in the news that you 
have removed from Jamestown to 
Johnstown, or that you have a new 
baby, the finest ever. But YOUR 
FRIENDS WILL BE INTEREST- 
ED. A card to the Alumni Month- 
ly will serve as an announcement. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



*••*•••••••"•■• 



The Anniversary 



Perfect weather, a record attend- 
ance, and the finest of spirit charac- 
terized the Anniversity Commence- 
ment. 

'The week opened with the under- 
graduate recital of the School of 
Music on Friday evening-, June 10. 
The following day was given up to the 
organ recital of the School of Music 
and the tennis meet with Penn State, 
which Bucknell won 6-0. 

Formal exercises began with the 
baccalaureate sermon on Sunday 
morning'. President Emory W. Hunt, 
speaking on the opening words of 
Paul's letter to the Hebrews, em- 
phasized the necessity and sweetness 
of the personal relationship to Christ. 

On Sunday evening the Oratorio 
Society presented Handel's "Judas 
Maccabaeus" in masterly fashion. 

Monday morning the graduating 
class of the School of Music appeared 
in recital in Bucknell Hall. In the af- 
ternoon the base ball team wound up 
its season by defeating Susquehanna 
University 7-5. At six-thirty the Re- 
pasz Band, of Williamsport, gave its 
first campus concert. After the con- 
cert the seniors presented as their 
class play "Seven Keys to Baldpate." 

Tuesday was Alumni Day, and busy 
from start to finish. The Alumni As- 
sociation Kionvened at nine o'clock for 



its annual business meeting, at which 
an entire re-organization of the body 
was effected. Carl C. Law, Esq., '85, 
of Pittsburgh, was elected President. 
At 11:30 the Alumnae Association 
met and resolved to undertake a "Wo- 
man's campaign for a new Woman's 
Building." At 12:30 the Alumnae 
held their annual luncheon in the Ev- 
angelical church, while the men gath- 
ered at the college dining hall for a 
stag luncheon. In the afternoon the 
annual Alumni base ball game result- 
ed in the usual prodigies of skill and 
valor on the part of the old timers. 
The anniversary pageant followed the 
base ball game. A new and delight- 
ful feature of the day was the Alumni 
supper, at which tables were reserved 
for the reunion classes. 

Following the second twilight con- 
cert by the Repasz Band, President 
and Mrs. Hunt held open house and 
extended greetings in their gracious 
way to a throng of Alumni and 
friends. The day closed with the 
Alumni Assembly in Tustin Gymnas- 
ium. 

On Wednesday morning the annual 
Commencement of the college was 
held in Commencement Hall. One 
hundred and thirty baccalaureate de- 
grees, twenty-seven Master's degrees 



and twenty-one diplomas in music 
were conferred. 

The five honorary degrees awarded 
this year awakened especial interest. 
Countess Elizabeth de Santa Eulalia, 
of Philadelphia, was awarded the de- 
gree of Doctor of Laws — the first 
woman to be thus honored by Buck- 
nell. Charles P. Vaughan, of Philadel- 
phia, an outstanding figure in the in- 
dustrial world, was given the degree 
of Doctor of Science. Upon Rev. 
Charles A. Brooks was conferred the 
degree of Doctor of Divinity. Two 
Bucknell alumni also — Joseph C. Haz- 
en, pastor of the First Baptist church, 
of Peoria, 111., and Joseph R. Wood, of 
the class of '94, Secretary of the Fed- 
eration of Churches of Newark, N. J. 
— received the D. D. 

The Corporation Dinner Wednesday 
noon brought the exercises to a close. 
President Hunt presided in character- 
istic fashion. Snappy addresses were 
made by the recipients of honorary 
degrees, and by Director Ernest L. 
Tustin, '84, who in closing invoked the 
prayers of Bucknellians for him in his 
responsible task of guiding the annual 
convention at Des Moines. 

Among the announcements was that 
of gifts of $55,000, of which $40,000 
came from Dr. Franklin J. Mathews, 
'68, and $15,000 from the estate of 
the late Henry Kirke Porter. 



DEATHS 

Captain Newton M. Brooks, Ex-'64 

The Washington, D. C, Star of 
July 6 contains the following notice 
of the death and funeral of Captain 
Newton M. Brooks, ex-'64: 

"Funeral services of Capt. Newton 
M. Brooks, former superintendent of 
foreign mails, who died Saturday 
night at his home, 224 A Street, South- 
east, were held yesterday at the resi- 
dence. 

"The services at the house were 
conducted by Rev. Dr. Freely Rohrer, 
pastor of Metropolitan Presbyterian 
church. Interment was at Arlington 
national cemetery. Military services 
were conducted by the Grand Army. 

Capt. Brooks was a member of the 
Association of Oldest Inhabitants of 
the District of Columbia, Grand Army 
Loyal Legion, and Sons of the Ameri- 
can Revolution. Members of these or- 
ganizations attended the services. 

"In 1890 Capt. Brooks negotiated 
the postal service treaty between the 
United States and Germany, whereby 
mails were exchanged at sea. In 1899 
he negotiated the parcel post arrange- 
ment with Germany. This was the 
first time this country had made such 



an arrangement with a European 
country. 

Capt. Brooks represented the Unit- 
ed States at the world's postal con- 
gress at Vienna in 1891, in this city in 
1897, at Berne in 1900, and at Rome in 
1906. 

"He received a number of postal 
service decorations, among which were 
the Order of Redemption from Liber- 
ia, Order of Liberator from Venezuela 
and Order of the Red Eagle from 
Germany." 

Edward Bishop Cornell, '81 

The Reverend Edward Bishop Cor- 
nell, of the class of 1881, died at West 
Brattleboro, Vermont, on August 23, 
of valvular heart trouble. 

The Watchman-Examiner of Sep- 
tember 1 contains a portrait and an 
appreciative notice of his work. "Mr. 
Cornell came to Vermont about four 
years ago as pastor at Putney, where 
he did excellent work to bring the 
three churches together in united 
work and worship. He went from 
Putney to West Brattleboro. During 
the past year forty-six new members 
have been received into that church. 
Mr. Cornell was a student of the Book 
and one who preached the Gospel in 



such a way as to win souls to Jesus 
Christ. He was interested in the 
work of the Kingdom at home and 
abroad. His church at West Brattle- 
boro went over the top in the New 
World movement drive. Mrs. Cornell 
who has been his faithful companion 
and assisted in all his good work, has 
the loving sympathy of all who know 
her." 

LaSvrence Vredenburg 

Lawrence Vredenburg, a former 
Bucknell student, died at the Wil- 
liamsport Hospital on Aug. 31 from 
injuries received in a motor accident. 
In company with Mr. Eaker, of Mun- 
cy, Mr. Vredenburg was returning 
home from Williamsport late in the 
evening, when at the bottom of a long 
hill the car skidded as it was being 
thrown into gear and struck a con- 
crete culvert at the side of the road. 
Mr. Vredenbtirg was thrown head- 
foremost to the pavement, striking it 
with such force that his skull was 
fractured. He was taken to the Wil- 
liamsport Hospital but passed away 
within a half hour after his arrival. 

His many friends in this vicinity 
were shocked at his death. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



Summer Weddings 



••(•:• 



ENGAGEMENTS 

McCormick- Walls 

The Lawshe residence was the 
scene on June sixth of the announce- 
ment of the betrothal of Miss Dorothy 
Walls, Institute '05, to Harry E. Mc- 
Cormick, ex-'04. 

This is the culmination of a delight- • 
ful romance which will link the lives 
of two popular young- people. Miss 
Walls and her fiance were students at 
Bucknell. Her home for years has 
been a center of student social life 
and she has hosts of friends. 

Mr. McCormick is a graduate of 
Bucknell, and carried off honors and 
records alike in athletics. After his 
graduation he played base ball on the 
Philadelphia Nationals, and at the in- 
stance of Christy Mathewson, was 
drafted by New York. He was well 
known as a "pinch hitter," saving his 
team in many a tight game. "Mac" 
is now an umpire with the National 
Leag-ue. 

The Lawshe girls, from girlhood, 
friends and playmates of Miss Walls, 
were accorded the privilege of making 
the announcement. The house was 
decorated in white and gold. A dome 
of hearts surmounted the dining table.- 
As transparencies in the dome there 
were insets of cupids and monograms 
of the names of the happy couple. 
About a score of immediate friends of 
the bride-to-be gathered for the event. 

The only prize of the evening was 
by the guests, a mayonnaise bowl of 
exquisite glass. Featuring as the 
beautiful touch of the evening was 
the beautiful linen table cloth worked 
in gold floss by Mrs. Margaret Irland 
Lawshe, mother of the Lawshe girls, 
one of the finest bits of handiwork in ' 
the vicinity. — Lewisburg Journal. 

Cockill-Hoy 

Thomas Cockill, ex-'18, was married 
to Miss Christing Hoy at the Luth- 
eran church in Schuylkill Haven, Sep- 
tember 14th. 

Mr. Cockill attended the University 
two years, leaving with the Ambu- 
lance Unit for France, where he was 
wounded in the knee. 

Mrs. Cockill is a graduate of Mount 
Ida School, near Boston. After spend- 
ing their honeymoon at Atlantic City 
they returned to Palmerton, where 
Mr. Cockill has charge of a neighbor- 
hood house, and supervises the ath- 
letics of the high school. 

Cobbitt-Hottenstein 

Miss Ethel Margaret Hottenstein, 
1914, was married June 16, 1921, to 
Dr. Louis A. Cobbitt. Dr. and Mrs. 
Cobbitt reside in Milton. 

® . ■ 

DR. AND MRS. HARRIS 

CELEBRATE THEIR 
WEDDING ANNIVERSARY 

Dr. and Mrs. Harris celebrated their 
fortieth wedding anniversary on Wed- 
nesday, July 20. Their childi-en and 
grandchildren were present, this being 
the first occasion in yeai-s on which 
the entii-e family had been assembled. 



GETTING MARRIED? 

If you are contemplating matri- 
mony, don't forget that your Buck- 
nell friends wish and are entitled 
to an accurate account of the cer- 
emony. You can assure their re- 
ceiving it by sending it to the 
Alumni Office. The Monthly dis- 
likes to publish hear-say accounts 
or clip meagre stories from other 
papers, but it is often compelled to 
do so for lack of better informa- 
tion. 



Stout-Park 

A very pretty "all Bucknell" sum- 
mer wedding was that of Olive Mill- 
cent Park, '05, and Russell Ray Stout, 
'20, which was held at the Methodist 
church at Montandon. The ceremony 
was performed by President emeritus 
John Howard Harris, assisted by the 
Rev. Percy Boughey, pastor of the 
church. 

Miss Mary R. Park, '22, was maid 
of honor, and W. Louis Park, '16, best 
man. The bride entered escorted by 
her brother, Theodore Park, '06. 

After the ceremony a reception was 
held in the Sunday school room of the 
church, following which Mr. and Mrs. 
Stout left for a wedding trip through 
West Virginia. 

Mitterling-Silbaugh 

Mr. Norman Mitterling, '15, was 
married on June 1 to Miss Ruth Sil- 
baugh, of Uniontown. After the cer- 
emony Mr. and Mrs. Mitterling en- 
joyed a honeymoon trip through New 
York. They will reside at York, Pa., 
where Mr. Mitterling has accepted a 
position on the faculty of the York 
High School. 

Lewis-Owens 

The marriage of Cyril Lewis, '16, 
and Miss Margaret Owens, of Ply- 
mouth, Pa., occurred in the learly 
summer. Their address will be 620 
Dorr St., Toledo, Ohio. 

Lighton-Eisley 

A quiet Lewisburg wedding was 
that of Mr. Lester E. Lighton, '20, and 
Miss Edna Eisley, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Spencer Eisley, of Lewis- 
burg, on June 22. The ceremony was 
performed by Dr. John T. Judd. 

Kunkel-Perry 

Miss Florence Perry and Mr. Stan- 
ford Kunkel were married quietly at 
the bride's home in Lewisburg, Aug. 
12. Because of the recent death of 
the bride's mother only the immediate 
relatives were present. 

Molloy-Oswalt 

Miss Jessie M. Oswalt, '15, was 
married on Tuesday, September 20, at 
Philadelphia, to Mr. Charles J. Mol- 
loy. 

Ranck-Farley 

Miss Mildred C. Farley, of New 
Columbia, and Bruce O. Ranck, '18, 
were married at the United Evangel- 



ical church of Hughesville, on June 1. 
The double ring ceremony was used. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ranck are at home 
now at Carney's Point, N. J. 

Topham-Speare 

Mr. Earle Melvin Topham, of Phila- 
delphia, and Miss Ray Speare, were 
united in marriage on Saturday even- 
ing, June 11, at 8 o'clock, by Rev. R. 
C. Peters. The ring ceremony was 
used. The bride and groom came in 
unattended while Miss Kathryn Wain- 
wright played the wedding march and 
Miss Kathryn Wagner sang "0, 
Promise Me." 

Eig-ht guests from Philadelphia 
motored up and witnessed the cere- 
mony. The bride and groom left on 
Monday morning by auto for their 
future home in Germantown. Mr. 
Topham was a gi'aduate of Bucknell 
in 1915. He was very popular as an 
athlete, also socially. "T'ip" as every- 
body knew him, has charge of the 
purification department of the United 
Gas Improvement Company. 

The bride is a charming and popu- 
lar Lewisburg girl. She graduated 
from Bucknell in 1917 and has been 
teaching ever since in Lewisburg,Wil- 
liamsport, and East Greenville High 
Schools. — Lewisburg Journal. 

Gold-Ulrich 

John S. Gold, '18, instructor in 
mathematics at the University, was 
married on September first to Miss 
Sybil Marie Ulrich, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Da-vid Ulrich, of Strawberry 
Ridg-e. The ceremony was performed 
at the home of the bride's parents by 
the Rev. Mr. Deibert, the bride's pas- 
tor. 

Mrs. Gold is a graduate of the 
Bloomsburg State Normal School and 
is a talented musician. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gold will reside this 
year in the home of Professor and 
Mrs. H. S. Everett. 

Park-Humphreys 

W. Louis Park, '16, was married to 
Miss Mildred H. Humphrey, of Boston, 
in August. 

Mrs. Park is a graduate of Colorado 
College and has taught in the High 
School at Bradford, Pa. 

Mr. and Mrs. Park will reside at 
Hinsdale, N. Y., where Mr. Park has 
accepted the principalship of the high 
school. 

Shimer-Beck 

Harold Lawson Shinier, '21, and 
Helen Scheidy Beck, ex-'21, were quar- 
ried quietly at Catasauqua, Sept. 28. 
They will reside in Milton, where Mr. 
Shinier has a position with the Milton 
Manufacturing Company. 

Follmer-Brown 

Frederick V. Follmer, '06, was mar- 
ried early in June to Miss Ella M. 
Brown. Their wedding tour carried 
them abroad, as stated in another col- 
umn. 



10 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



•*•»»•'•*•• " > " • " •"•"*—**•*" 



P 



ersonais 



1: 



.,•..•..•..•»•.••»•»••••»••••«•»•«•"••• 



WE AGREE 

Dear Editor: 

Being unable to attend Com- 
mencement because of school still 
being in session, I have sought 
eagerly to read every scrap of 
news about Commencement and 
graduation time. 

Often as I have read the Month- 
ly I have felt sorry that more folks 
had not cared enough to send an 
item concrning their work. How 
nice it would be to pick up the 
Monthly and find a bit of news con- 
cerning each member of the class. 
It would mean so much to those 
who are unable to attend Com- 
mencement and meet old friends. 
I hope more folks will feel the 
same way. 

Elizabeth N. Patterson, '20. 



•••"•■••"•"•"•"•"I 



1896 



^•..•»«»«*.»>.*..t..«<.i 



»•-••••"• -•-••^••••••••i 



1865 

General John W. Hagne, who was 
one of the oldest alumni in attend- 
ance at Commencement, left Pitts- 
burgh immediately after Commence- 
ment for a trip across the continent 
to California, where he visited rela- 
tives during the summer. His address 
is 2948 California St., San Francisco. 
1875 

Inst. — Laura Grace Brass Riddell is 
a Federal clerk in care of the Forest 
Service. Ferry Building, San Francis- 
co, Calif. 

1883 

Margaret Tustin O'Harra, Inst. '83, 
has been taking an active interest in 
the school situation in Philadelphia. 
In a letter to the Public Ledger in 
June she defends the cultural ideal of 
education against the so-called "ef- 
ficiency" idea. 

1887 

Professor and Mrs. Justin Van 
Gundy and daughter, of Monmouth, 
Illinois, visited Mr. Van Gundy's sis- 
ters. Misses Sara and Anna Van 
Gundy and renewed acquaintances in 
Lewisburg during the summer. 
1888 

Charles V. Clingman, ex-'88, is now 
located at Kansas City, Missouri. 

Mrs. George L. Price, formerly Jean 
Clingman, Inst. '88, resides at Yales- 
burg, Illinois. 

The Reverend Frederick H. Seft is 
Tiastor of the Gospel Tabernacle in 
Philadelphia, Vice President of the 
Christian Missionary Alliance and ed- 
itor of the Alliance Weekly. 
1891 

Mrs. Samuel Border (formerly Mary 
Rogers), Inst. '91, resides' at 218 West 
Pine St., Clearfield, Pa. 
1892 

George W. Wagenseller, who has 
conducted the Middleburg Post for 
the past twenty-seven years, has or- 
ganized a stock company among his 
employes with himself as president, 
which will conduct the newspaper in 
future. 



The Rev. D. B. Lewis, pastor of the 
Sharon Baptist church, in the last 
vear added sixty-three members to 
his church. The last half of a $13,000 
mortgage was cancelled. During the 
winter the prayer-meeting attendance 
was half the resident membership. A 
children's meeting held by the pastor 
on Friday evenings averaged an at- 
tendance of 1-50. 

"Dr. Mary Wolfe to Get Barrel of 
Fine Whisky" was the startling head- 
line carried by the Lewisburg Satur- 
day News of Sept. 3. Perusal of the 
story revealed the sad fact that the 
whisky was not to be Dr. Wolfe's 
personal possession, but simply to be 
assigned to the Pennsylvania Village, 
of which she is superintendent. 

Professor Henry T. Colestock en- 
joyed his summer as platform super- 
intendent for the Swarthmore Chau- 
tauqua. His route carried him through 
North Carolina, Virginia, West Vir- 
ginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania and 
New York. 

The Rev. Alvin A. Cober, of the 
Memorial church, Newberry, Pa., 
passed his vacation in Ohio. In July 
he preached the sermon at the ordin- 
ation of his son, Larue, at President 
Harding's church, in Marion. 

1897 

Leroy T. Butler is the new cashier 
of the Union National Bank of Lew- 
isburg. Besides this he finds time to 
be treasurer of most of the organiza- 
tions in town. 

The Rev. Frank Hollinshead, of 
Lockport, N. Y., who is one of Buck- 
nell's most loyal sons, called at the 
Alumni Office during the summer va- 
cation. 

The Rev. Edward C. Kunkle, pastor 
of the First Baptist church, of West 
Chester, Pa., passed his vacation at 
East Northfield, Mass. His family ac- 
companied him. 

1898 

Professor F. W. Dillon, of the Uni- 
versity of Kansas School of Journal- 
ism, had -full charge of the round table 
conferences on high school publica- 
tions at the university summer school. 
He conducted also several short cours- 
es in journalistic methods. 

Andrew A. Leiser, Jr., has been 
spending some time with his parents 
in Lewisburg. 

Mrs. Edna Stifker Meyer, ex-'98, 
resides at 16 Orchard St., Leominster, 
Mass. 

1900 

Charles Way Harvey's China ad- 
dress is 20 Museum Road, Shanghai, 
China. 

Mrs. John B. Dumont, formerly 
Louise A. L. Seller, Inst. '00, is presi- 
dent of the Pittsburgh Alumnae Club. 
Her address is 312 Frederick Ave., Se- 
wickley, Pa. 

1901 

Dr. William E. "Billy" Thompson, 



of Philadelphia, was at the Hill at the 
opening of college, getting his son 
properly started on his college course. 

Caleb B. Ayars, Jr., is now located 
at Newport, N. J. 

Mrs. E. W. Pogue, formerly Mabel 
Browning, Inst. '01, is secretary- 
treasurer of the Pittsburgh Alumnae 
Club. 

1902 

Thomas P. Kyle, who is a teacher 
in the Paterson, N. J., High School, 
has been instrumental in sending 
twenty students to Bucknell in the 
past few years. This year three came 
from the Jersey town. 

1903 

A. F. Dershimer, whose home ad- 
dress is 425 South Second St., Bangor, 
Pa., is a captain in the regular army. 

Ernest L. Taylor passed the sum- 
mer at Harford, Pa. 

Roger Williams occupied the pulpit 
in the Lewisburg Baptist church, July 
10th. 

1904 

Walter S. Wilcox and Mrs. Wilcox 
passed through Lewisburg in August, 
returning from a motor trip through 
New York state, which they made in 
comnany with Marc L. Baldwin, '11, 
and Cecil Childs Baldwin, '12. 

The grave of Col. Wallace W. Fetz- 
er was visited by Milton Rotarians 
during their tour of the Continent, 
which followed the International Con- 
vention at Edinburgh. 

William M. Martz has removed to 
119 Schuele Ave., Buffalo, N. Y. 

1905 

Ralph L. Belford, Esq., of Milton, 
attended the Chautauqua in Lewis- 
burg- this summer. 

George W. Cockill was highly suc- 
cessful with the Shamokin base ball 
team, which he managed during the 
summer. 

Miss Nellie Johnson, of Mount Car- 
mel, visited Lewisburg friends in July. 

Earl Austin Morton spent several 
days at the Phi Gamma Delta house 
during August. 

1906 

Miss Elbina Bender is now located 
in Pasadena, Calif. 

Harry C. Hoffa, ex-'06, is -with the 
Atlantic Refining Company in Phila- 
delphia. His address is 625 South 
Conestoga St., West Philadelphia. 

Robert B. Leighou, who is on the 
faculty of the Carnegie Institute of 
Technology, spent part of the vacation 
at his home in Northumberland. 

Harry M. Parmley, ex-'06, was re- 
cently transferred from the Auditor 
General's Department to the State 
Treasury Department. His home ad- 
dress is 214 5 North Second St., Har- 
risburg, Pa. 

Mis. Bruce Kester, formerly Gert- 
rude Stannert, visited her mother in 
Lewisburg recently. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



11 



|»«««»«..»H»»«..«..«..«..««, 



P 



ersonais 



L 



James T. Thatcher, ex-'06, who 
spent the summer at Rye, N. Y., called 
on Levvisburg friends the week-end of 
August 22. 

1907 

The Rev. Alfred Whitby has re- 
moved from Duluth to International 
Falls, Minn. 

The church of the Rev. Havard 
Griffith, at Geneva, N. Y., has been 
renovated. The Rev. F. B. Igler, '12, 
supplied in the Geneva church during 
August. 

Spencer T. Harris is with the State 
Highway Department at Hawley, Pa. 

Dr. C. R. Hoechst visited Professor 
Paul G. Stolz, July 29 and 30, leaving 
then for a tour through New York. 

Mr. and Mrs. George W. Leach have 
returned to New Bethlehem, Pa. 

W. W. Raker is principal of the 
Bloonisburg High School. He resides 
at 223 West First St., Bloonisburg. 

Frank Smigelsky is manager of the 
St. Lawrence Silk Co., at Ogdensburg, 
N. Y. 

1908 

Philip B. Irey and Mrs. Irey, form- 
erly Blanche Sechler, Music '06, of 
New Orleans, were North during the 
summer visiting relatives in this sec- 
tion. 

Frank Pryzbylski, ex-'08, is teach- 
ing chemistry and natural science at 
the Polish National College at Cam- 
bridge Sorings, Pa. He participated 
in the World War from beginning to 
end with the Canadian forces as 
Frank Blaya, which name he has now 
assumed as his legal name. 

Mrs. Roy A. Lowther, formerly 
Ruth Jones, ex-'08, resides at 13 12 
Spring St., Parkersburg, W. Va. 

Mrs. Robert Kline, formerly Edna 
Seaman, is living at 365 N. Main St., 
Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

Professor Paul G. Stolz and family- 
toured New York state in August. En 
route they visited Mr. and Mrs. Coit 
R. Hoechst at the home of Mrs. 
Hoechst's parents, in Camptown, Pa. 

1909 

John A. Hess is a teacher of chem- 
istry in the Morris High School, New 
York City. He resides at 22 South 
Fifteenth St .,Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Captain Evan D. Roser, ex-'09, 
of New York City, made a brief stop 
in Lewisburg during July. Mrs. Roser 
formerly Kathryn Hopper, Mus. '11, 
visited friends for some time. 

1910 

Homer D. Kresge is with the New 
York Times Company as business 
manager of Current History, the Mid- 
week Pictorial and the History of 
the World War. 

G. Howard Northrup, who pitched 
the earlier part of the season for the 
Milwaukee club of the American As- 
sociation, was traded in August to 
the Columbus club, with which he fin- 
ished the season. 

Newton R. Quintin is engaged in 
valuation work for the Engineering 
Committee of Railway Executives. 



His address is 32 Nassau St., New 
York City. 

Elmer B. Woods this summer re- 
signed the superintendency of the 
Glassboro schools, a position in which 
he had made a notable record, to be- 
come office manager of the Philadel- 
phia branch of Long, Kay and Com- 
pany, Brokers, of Newark, N. J. His 
address is 1420-26 Penn Square, Phil- 
adelphia. 

1911 

Mrs. C. E. John, of Mount Carmel, 
formerly Stella Houghton, visited rel- 
atives in Lewisburg during the sum- 
mer. 

Mr. and Mrs. William H. Schuyler 
passed the summer at the home of 
Mrs. Schuyler's parents in Maryland. 
Mr. Schuyler will be in residence this 
year at the University of Virginia, 
doing graduate work in chemistry. 

Mrs. Evan D. Roser, formerly Kath- 
ryn Hopper, visited sevei-al weeks in 
Lewisburg. 

1912 

Dale D. Hollenbaugh is a sales en- 
gineer in New York. His business ad- 
dress is 291 Broadway. 
^Kenneth R. McClaran is an engineer 
assistant with the Bell Telephone 
of Pennsylvania. He may be addess- 
ed at 1317 Chelsea Ave., Wilkinsburg, 
Pa. 

1913 

The Rev. George Middleton is pas- 
tor of the Calvary Baptist church of 
Syracuse, N. Y. 

Lewis Perrine Robinson may be ad- 
dressed at the Diomedians Club, 51 
West 48th St., New York City. 

Sue Weddell is convalescing from 
the influenza in Chicago. 

The Rev. Henry G. Weston Smith 
has an article in "The Baptist" of 
June 25 entitled "The High Pressure 
School of Missions." 

John R. Bogert is manager of the 
New York office of the Pittsburg-h 
Bridge and Iron Works. His address 
is 2 Rector St. 

John W. Bressler is with the Hell- 
man Motor Company of Long Island 
City. His address is 125 Lafayette 
Ave., Brooklyn. 

The Rev. John D. W. Fetter, who is 
Baptist student pastor at Cornell, was 
recreation director at the New York 
State Summer Assembly at Keuka 
College. 

Carey W. Harding- is superintendent 
of the Hai-tford schools, residing at 
Nutwood, Ohio, R. D. 1. 

Mr. Howard V. Fisher and Mrs. 
Fisher, formerly Margaret McClure, 
Inst. '12, spent the week of August 22 
with relatives in Lewisburg. 

Dr. Joseph P. Shearer is surgeon at 
the Florence Infirmary, Florence, S. C. 

1914 

Nevin G. Bachman is Butler county 
sales manager for the R. L. Dollings 
Company. His address is 207 West 
Diamond St. 

Harry G. Campbell is in charge of a 
laboratory at Clairton, Pa. 



Frances McNall, '14, and Marjorie 
McNall, '16, of 16 Evart St., Wash- 
ington, D. C, visited Mr. and Mrs. F. 
O. Schnure, in August, at their Spar- 
rows Point, Md., home. 

Mrs. Harry S. Weaver, (Eudora 
Hamler), visited her mother in Lew- 
isburg late in August. 

Ruth Hoffa Frantz spent part of 
August with friends at Millville, N, J., 
and Atlantic City. 

Professor John W. Rice, who was in 
attendance at Columbia for the sum- 
mer session, returned to his home in 
Lewisb-urg in August and remained to 
help get things moving at college 
opening. He left late in September 
for New York, to spend the year in 
graduate work at Columbia. 

Jesse Riley has removed from Nsw 
Martinsburg to St. Marys, West Vir- 
ginia. 

1915 

Joseph W. Aleshouckas, who is 
aero mechanical engineer with the 
engineering division of the Air Ser- 
vice at MeCook Field, may be address- 
ed at 116 Shaw Ave., Dayton, Ohio. 

Clair Groover has been named a 
first lieutenant in the 103d Cavalry, 
Pennsylvania National Guard. 

Misses Florence and Francis Bar- 
ber spent the summer at their home in 
Lewisburg. 

Helen Reed, ex-'15, is secretary to 
the Secretary of Alumni at Williams 
College. 

1916 

Edgar Campbell, '16, visited the 
Hill and the Alumni Office in August. 
He is just convalescent fi'om an oper- 
ation but swears he will be on hand 
for the Alumni Homecoming. He is 
very enthusiastic about the develop- 
ment of the campus in the past few 
years. 

John R. Kurtz is principal of the 
Vandergrift, Pa., High School. 

Homer M. Sanders, of Vicksburg, 
Pa., was a caller at the Alumni Office 
in July. 

1917 

Mrs. Carl Schug, of Williamsport, 
foi-meily Miss Alice Johnson, and 
Miss Katherine Clayton, of Buffalo, 
visited in Lewisburg in August and 
were guests of honor at a tea given 
by Mrs. Albert W. Johnson. 

Donald Haman visited in Lewisburg 
over the week-end of July 16. 

Charles A. Soars is a chemical en- 
gineer residing- at 313 Vine St., Eliz- 
abeth, N. J. 

Irvin P. Sowers, who was in Lewis- 
burg during the summer, is teaching 
S"ience and nwthematics at the Lyons 
Farm School. He resides at Hillside, 
N. J. 

Ethel V. Ward attended the summer 
se sion at State College. She is teach- 
ing English this year in the Wilming- 
ton, Del., High School. 

Mrs. A. W. Elliott, formerly Mar- 
garet Collins, spent the vacation with 
relatives in Lewisburg. 



12 



A MODEL CONSTITUTION 
FOR LOCAL CLUBS 

ARTICLE I. 

Name. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 

meeting of this Club annually, and 
such other meetings as may be pro- 
vided for by the Club, or called by its 
Executive Committee. 



The name of this organization shall 
be the Bucknell University Club 

of '. 

ARTICLE II. 
Purposes. 
The Club is formed to co-operate 
with the Alumni Office and General 
Alumni Association of Bucknell Uni- 
versity in order to 

(a) Bring about closer fellovyship 
among the Alumni, former stu- 
dents and friends of the Uni- 
versity. 

(b) Advance the interests of the 
University. 

(c) Promote literary and scientific 
pursuits and matters kindred 
thereto. 

ARTICLE IIL 

Membership. 
All graduates and former students 
of Bucknell University residing at.... 

shall be eligible to 

membership in this club. But, when 
other Bucknell Club or Clubs are 
formed in said district, the territorial 
jurisdiction of this Club shall be de- 
termined by the Board of Managers 
of the General Alumni Association of 
Bucknell University. 

ARTICLE IV. 
Officers. 

The officers of this Club shall con- 
sist of the President, Vice President, 
Secretary, and Treasurer (the Secre- 
tary and Treasurer may be one per- 
son) who, together with two addit- 
ional members appointed by the Pres- 
ident or elected by the Club, shall 
constitute the Executive Committee of 
the Club. 

The duties of the President and 
Vice President shall be those gener- 
ally exercised by such officers. 

The duties of the Secretary shall 
be those generally pertaining to that 
office, and, in addition, the Secretary 
shall be charged with the duty of 
sending to the Secretary of the Gen- 
eral Alumni Association, at the Uni- 
versity, complete reports of all meet- 
ings and elections and a list of those 
in attendance thereat. The Secretary 
shall also notify said Alumni Secre- 
tary of changes of addresses, of 
deaths and marriages among the 
former students in this vicinity, of 
public honors bestowed upon them 
and shall give such other information 
as shall be a matter of Alumni rec- 
ord. 

The duties of the Treasurer shall 
be those which generally pertain to 
the office, and, in addition, the Treas- 
urer shall be charged with the duty 
of collecting the annual dues paid the 
General Alumni Association from the 
members of this Club who belong to 
the General Alumni Association, and 
shall remit the same to the Treasurer 
of the General Alumni Association. 
The amount due and from whom due 
shall be evidenced by a statement 
rendered by the Treasurer of the Gen- 
eral Alumni Association to the Treas- 
urer of this Club. 

The Executive Committee shall ex- 
ercise the powers and authority of 
the Club, subject to such direction as 
the Club may prescribe. 

ARTICLE V. 
Meetings. 

There shall be held at least one 



ARTICLE VI. 

Representative on Alumni Council. 

This Club annually shall elect one 
of its members to be its representa- 
tive on the Alumni Council of the 
General Alumni Association of Buck- 
nell University. If the representative 
so elected shall be unable to attend 
the annual or special meetings of the 
Alumni Council, he shall notify the 
President of this Club, who shall ap- 
point another member to attend such 
meeting, but such appointment shall 
be for one such meeting only. 
ARTICLE VII. 
Dues. 

The annual dues of this Club shall 

be ..— which 

shall be collected with any dues owed 
by a member hereof to the General 
Alumni Association of Bucknell Uni- 
versity. 

ARTICLE VIII. 
By-Laws. 

Section 1. It shall be the duty of 
the President to preside at all meet- 
ings of the Club and to perform all 
other duties usually imposed upon the 
officer. The Vice President shall per- 
form the duties of the President in 
case of the latter's absence or disa- 
bility. In case of the absence of both 
the President and the Vice President, 
then the duties of that office shall be 
performed during the absence or dis- 
ability of both the President and the 
Vice President by any member chosen 
by the Executive Committee for that 
purpose. 

Section 2. It shall be the duty of 
the Secretary to keep a record of the 
proceedings of all the meetings of the 
Club, and he shall also correspond 
with the Secretary of the Alumni As- 
sociation at the University, as pro- 
vided by the constitution, and he is 
specially charged with the duty of 
sending reports of all dinners, meet- 
ings, and similar gatherings, held by 
this Club, to the Secretary of the 
Alumni Association for publication in 
the Bucknell Alumni Monthly. 

Section 3. It shall be the duty of 
the Treasurer to receive all moneys 
paid into the Club and to disburse 
money on orders signed by the Presi- 
dent or the Secretary. He shall also 
collect and forward dues to the Gen- 
eral Alumni Association as provided 
in Article IV of the Constitution. 

Section 4. The Bucknell Alumni 
Monthly shall be the official organ of 
this Club. 

Section 5. Five or more shall con- 
stitute a quorum sufficient to do busi- 
ness at any regular, special or ad- 
journed meeting of the Club. 

Section 6. These By-Laws may be 
amended at any meeting of the Club. 

Section 7. Robert's Rules of Order 
shall govern parliamentary question 
in the meetings of this Club. 



-<S>- 



MANY ALUMNI 

VISIT THE BURG 

The old haunts of Bucknell and 
Lewisburg attracted many of the 
alumni during the summer. Many 
spent their entire vacation here while 
others stopped over for a few hours 
to renew old acquaintances and pledge 
anew their loyalty to old Bucknell. 
Among those who returned were: 



Russell HamHin, '14, Marion Ban- 
croft, '20, Elizabeth F. Spyker, '19, 
Helen R. Hoflfa, '19, Marian Goho, '20, 
Elizabeth W. Stephens, '18, Stanley 
Harris, '18, and wife (Ruth Embrey, 
'16), A. A. Leiser, '98, Phil Irey, '08, 
and wife, Jeannette Owens, '17, Don 
Haman, '17, Raymond D. Tice, '19, and 
wife, Elmer Fairchild, '14, and wife. 

Malcolm Musser, '18, and wife, Dr. 
G. C. L. Riemer, '95, Frank Rorabach, 
'19, Mrs. Evan D. Roser, (S. Kathryn 
Hopper, Mus. '11), Laura E. McGann, 
'11, Hilding A. Larson, '20, Mrs. H. 
Duff Hoblitzell (Evelyn McGann, '18), 
Florence B. Barber, '15, Frances F. 
Barber, '15, Isabelle B. Bond, '15, 
Channing P. Derr, ex-'13, Nellie E. 
Johnson, '05, George T. Bender, '17, 
Donald R. Dunkle, '17, Frank E. Stet- 
ler, '17, Aaron M. Stetler, '13, and 
wife. 

Frank E. Williams, '17, and wife 
(Pearl Ream, '12), Russell A. Bostian, 
'18, Charles Anchor, '18, Chester S. 
Kiefer, '18, Annette A. Stahl, '18, 
Merrill W. Brown, '20, Nelson E. 
Chance, '20, David R. Crossgrove, '20, 
Miller A. Johnson, '20, Wm. E. C. 
Speare, '20, Weber L. Gergart, '19, 
K. Luetta Wagner, '20, Vernie G. Noll, 
'16, Paul B. Lewis, '16, and Chas. H. 
Davies, ex-'19. 

Many alumni returned for the open- 
ing of college. At the Phi Kappa 
Psi house the following appeared: 
Boyd Newcomb, ex-'18, now line 
coach for the Bucknell grid squad, 
George Benjamin, '20, Stewart Ep- 
ler, '21, Rube Hayes, '17, Barton Mac- 
key, ex-'18, and Alexander Storer, ex- 
'17. 

The Sigma Alpha Epsilon active 
chapter welcomed Frank Rorabach, 
'18, Walter D. Roos, '20, Evan In- 
gram, '20, Henry Weber, '20, Robert 
Hartz, '21, John Hughes, '21, Grant 
Painter, '17, and Thomas Umlauf, '20. 

The Lambda Chi Alphas were glad 
to see William Rolfe, '20, Llewellyn 
Jones, '20, Roy Stein, '21, and Ernest 
Hewet, '20. 

Delta Sigma greeted Carl Geiger, 
'15, Clinton I. Sprout, '17, and wife, 
(Louise Hahn, '18), Ernest Cruse, '19, 
Russell Hamblin, '14, Elton P. Rich- 
ards, '20, Alex. Roller, '21, and Rob- 
ert Angstadt, '21. 

Francis Becklev, '17, Henry L. 
Fonda. '18, B. V. Hastings, '13, H. L. 
Shinier, '21, and George J. B. Schuy- 
ler visited their Phi Gamma Delta 
brothers. 

The Sigma Chis greeted Dr. Wm. 
Thompson, '00, Russell Stout, '20,Wm. 
H. Morrison, ex-'20, Arthur Harris, 
'21, Lambert Botts, '20, and DeWitt 
Botts, '19. 



OCCUPATION, PLEASE 

It would greatly increase the 
number of readable "Personals" in 
the Monthly if the Alumni when 
they return an "Address Wanted" 
card, would take the additional 
minute required to fill out the line 
marked "Occupation" with some 
note of interest concerning them- 
selves or other Alumni. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



IS 



ADVERTISING RATES 
Per inch, single column, $1.00 
Time discounts, 4 times, $3.50 ; 9 times $7.50. 

ITime 4 Times 6 Times 

>/4 page $6.00 $22.50 $50.00 

1/2 page 10.00 37.50 75.00 



Send Copy 



to 



Full Page '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.' .'.'.'.'.' 20.00 75.00 150.00 ROY H. LANDIS 

Lewisburg, Pa. 



No Preferred position. 
Minimum size of adv., 1 inch. 



Harold C. Edwards, '15 



ATTORN EY-AT-LAW 



STROUDSBURG, PENNA. 



For Real Service, Let B. U. Men Serve You 

During tlie past fe-w years over rive nunared (500) Bucknell Students liave taken 
out Life Insurance policies witn tne E/quitable Life or Iowa. Successful men invari- 
ably are men wto, in early years, realized tne value of life insurance. 

Life Insurance makes for Success 

Tyson, '11 RICE y TYSON, Gen. Agts., 906 Kunkel Bldg., Harristurg, Pa. 



Andrew A. Leiser Andrew A. Lciser, Jr. 
U.atL.,'69 B. U.. -98, Yale. -99 

Law OfBc.es of 

Andrew Albright Leiser 
Andrew Albright Leiser, Jr. 

Lewisburg', Union County 
Pennsylvania 


The Nifflinburg Telegraph 

Printers of 

THE BUCKNELLIAN 
Miffljnburg, Pa. 


Wm. R. FOLLMER 

ATTORN EY-AT-LAW 

Notary In Office 

Lewisburg Penna. 



Edgar Summers, 

President and Treas. 



J. C. Fowler, Chas. E. Fisher 

Sec'y- and Mgr. Sales Manager 



Watsontown Brick Company 



Paving Blocks 

Bevel Edge 

Wire Cut 

Persians 

or 

Rough Face 



jyianufacturers of 



Red Shale 
Brick 




a 



Red Breasts 

Blue Ring 

Green Pace 

Glazed Headers 

Dull Headers 



14 



These Lewisburg Firms Support the Monthly; Patronize Them. 



COLLEGE IIVK 

Inseparably Linked With Life "On the Hill" 
GOOD EATS AND GOOD TIMES, THE LAW AND PROPHETS OF OUR MENU 

"ON THE QUADRANGLE" PAYNE, '09 



Lewisburg Trust 
and Safe Deposit Co. 

Commenced Business 1907. 

CAPITAL $125,000 

SURPLUS AND PROFITS, 91,000 
DEPOSITS 1,025,000 

DANIEL F. GREEN, Treas. 

Prowant's Toggery 
Shop 

Lewisburg - - - Pa. 



Lewisburg Gas Co. 



j^ 



W. B. Byerly 

Dealer in 

Home Dressed Meats 

IREV'S 
SHOE S K )RE 

A. J. Irey, '79. 



H. J. Nogel & Bro. 

Je-weler and Optometrist 
Lewisburg, Pennsylvania 



SHOE SHINE 
Cleaning and Pressing, 50c 

227 Market St. Lewisburg, Pa. 



Steininger's Grocery 

For Good, Clean and Whole- 
some Groceries 

University Book 
Store 

Books, Stationery 
and School Supplies 

Mail Orders Promptly 
Attended to 

Kramer s Care 

2nd Street 

Regular Meals 

Quick Lunch 



W. C. Walls, 
Pres. 



John W. Bucher, 
Cash. 



The Lewisburg National Bank 

The oldest Bank in Union County. 
Established 1853. Capital $100,000. 
Surplus and Profits S200,000. 3% In- 
terest paid on Savings Accounts. 

DELMAR INN 



A. J. DUNKLE, Prop. 

W. A. BLAIR 

FRESH AND SMOKED MEATS 

Wholesaler of Pork, Sausage, etc. 

Fancy and Staple Groceries 

OYSTERS IN SEASON. 



DR. E. S. HEISER 

DRUGGIST 
Developing and Printing 

The New 

Sporting Goods Store 

Reliable and Up-to-date 

REACH QUALITY 
J. F. Reber & Co. 



Union National Bank 

Strong Capital and Surplus 
SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES 

TRAVELERS' CHECKS 



Le Roy T. Butler, Cashier. 

Herman & Leiser 

Dry Goods, Notions, and 

Ladies' Ready-to- Wear 

Apparel. 



J. FRED ZELLER 

JEWELER and 
OPTOMETRIST 

HOWARD LEISER 

Dry Goods, Notions, Groceries, 
Queensware, Etc 

China to Rent 

Lewisburg Fire-Proof 
Garage Co. 

Storage-Repair Shop-Accessories 

West End Meat Market 

dealer in 

All Fresh and Smoked Meats 

HILL'S DRUG STORES 

2 Stores 2 
Lewisburg, Penna. 



Renew Your Acquaintance With 
"The Purity Special" Sundae. 

Take home with you a box of our 
HOMEMADE CANDY. 

THE PURITY 



Transact Your Business In Lewisburg Through Our Advertisers. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



15 



THE COLLEGE SMOKE SHOP 

Opposite Phi Psi House JIM EARLE, '23, Prop. HUCK WAGNER, 24, Asst. 

2nd year of existence. Drop in when in town 



WE WANT YOUR SHIRTS 

Mail 'em in 

Peerless Laundry 

Thompson, '04. Donehower, '06 

Milton Lewisburg Sunbury 



THE 



SHIELDS 

Photographic 
Studio 



J. C. REEDY 

Dealer In 

Furniture and Carpets 

530 Market Street 



Oliver J. Decker, '99 

ATTORN EY-AT-L A \V 

20-21 Trust Building 
WILLIAMSPORT PENNA. 



PAUL G. SMITH, 05 

Attorney-at-Law 

HARRISBURG, PA. 

State Department practice, in- 
cluding Corporation Tax and 
Public Service Commission mat- 
ters. 



Geo. P. Miller, '84 



FIRE INSURANCE 



82 University Ave., Lewisburg, Pa. 



BUCKINEUL UINIVERSITV 

EMORY W. HUNT, D. D., LL. D., PRESIDENT 

Alumni : Help us maintain and increase a waiting list of applicants for admission by filling 



out the blanks below: 

Theron Clark, Registrar 

Dear Sir: — 

The following are prospective 
college students of the first rank and 
should be on Bucknell's roll next fall. 
[ recommend them on the basis of 
scholarship and leadership. 



Signed 



Theron Clark, Reg^istrar 
Dear Sir: — 

Please send information about 

. . .Arts Courses 

. . .Preparation for Ministry 

. . .Preparation for Teaching 

...Preparation for Law 

...Preparation for Medicine 

...Preparation for Business 

...Preparation for Social Work 

. . . Mechanical Engineering 

. . . Electrical Engineering 

. . . Civil Engineering 

. . . Chemical Engineering 

. . .Science Courses 

. . .School of Music 

. . .General Catalog 

. . .Campus Views 

. . .Expenses 

. . .Application for Admission 

To 



Signed 



G. G. PAINTER, '17, President 



Printers of the Alumni Monthly 



The Sun Printing kS^ Binding Co., Inc. 

Designers and Producers of 

DISTINCTIVE PRINTING 

Booklets, Catalogues, Direct-by-Mail Advertising, Office Forms, Etc. 

Sun Building, AA' illiamsport. Pa. 



16 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



piMnri m\ 



m uiM 



umn 



MflJIMiEpjMlMip Mip liMIfl [HilMp tliMliTflllMI 



Who Was John Hancock? ^^ 

asked Thomas A. Edison in his Employment 

■ Questionnaire. "Where have I seen that 

name," thought the aspirant, and answered, 

"President of a Life Insurance Company." 

Who Was John Hancock?^* 

of whom Senator George F. Hoar, of Massa- 
chusetts, said, "He wrote his name where 
all nations should behold it, and all time 
should not efface it." 



We will pay 
One Hundred Dollars ($100) for the 
best answer to Mr. Edison^s question. 

Competition closes November 15, 1921 

ADDRESS 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLICITY 




PA NY 



OF Boston, Massachusetts 



m 



imimiiMimiiiiiM 



MIMpinMIjlMM^ ■WflMMflMlIM 



Bucknell Alumni Monthly 



Vol VI 



November, 1921 



No. 2 




Dr. Joseph Kerr Weaver, '61 
Alumnus, Trustee, Benefactor 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



Bucknell Alumni Monthly 

EDITOR 

LEO L. ROCKWELL, '07 
LOCAL EDITOR 

HARRY R. WARFEL, '20 
SPORTS EDITORS 

C. E. GLASS, '16 

A. H. HASLAM, '23 

CORRESPONDENTS 

EVELYN STANTON GUNDY, '90 

Lewisburg, Pa. 

MARY BARTOL THEISS, '94 

Muncy, Pa. 

ROMAIN C. HASSRICK, '06 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

ANNE WHITE GALBRAITH, '07 

Williamsport, Pa. 
VICTOR B. LUCHSINGER, ex-'08 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

HELEN FORREST HERSHEY, '08 

Chicago, 111. 

ALLAN G. HITTER. '09 

Los Angeles, Calif. 

H. G. FLORIN, '09 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

WEAVER W. PANGBURN, '10 

New York, N. Y. 

FLORENCE M. ROLLINS, '16 

Altoona, Pa. 

HELEN MOYLE BAILEY, "20 

Cleveland, O. 

ADVERTISING MANAGER 

ROY H. LANDIS, '22 

Published monthly during the college year by the Bucknell University 

Alumni Association. 

Annual Subscription, including Alumni Association dues $2.50 

Annual Subscription to life members under the $5 and $10 plan.„.$1.50 
Checks should be made payable to Frank M. Simpson, Treasurer. 



DR. WEAVER 

In Dr. Joseph Kerr Weaver the University loses a constant 
and devoted friend. Tliough not endovi-ed with large wealth, 
he gave liberally of what he had, and his kindly interest 
for the institution and all coijinected with it was warming 
to the hearts of all who came in contact with him. 



THE NEW COLLECTION PLAN 

We would call the attention of the alumni, and espe- 
cially of the treasurers of the local Bucknell clubs, to the 
method provided by the new constitution for the collection 
of dues of the General Association, which include the sub- 
scription price of the Alumni Monthly. This method calls 
for collection from members of local clubs by the local 
treasurer, who shall forward the dues to General Treasurer 
F. M. Simpson. Those who prefer may of course send their 
cheek directly to Professor Simpson. 

Those who are not in the districts of any Alumni Club 
will be billed by the General Treasurer. 

The Treasurer wishes announcement to be made that no 
receipt will be sent. The returned checks will serve as re- 
ceipts. 



OUR AMBITION 



THE "AL" JORDAN TESTIMONIAL 

Between halves, after Lafayette had retired to the gym- 
nasium and while the blanketed Bucknell team was resting 
in the middle of the field, hand bills explaining the "Al" 
Jordan Testimonial were scattered among the crowd, and 
shortly afterward a squad of upper-classmen armed with 
large tin pans made the rounds of the grandstand and bleach- 
ers. The crowd responded generously to the appeal, rolling 
up a fund of almost .$600 for this loyal Bucknellian. 

Since some of the alumni who did not come home on 
October 15th may wish to be included in the contributors 
to the Jordan Testimonial Fund, we append a copy of the 
hand-bill which was distributed at the Homecoming game. 

FELLOW BUCKNELLIANS AND FRIENDS: 

In the papers all over the country several weeks ago, 
there appeared articles in which the famous "Big Six" was 
honored by the many fans who had seen him perform from 
the box in the uniform of the Giants. At the present time 
there is a fellow-Bucknellian, who during his college course 
brought great honors to his Alma Mater. Al. Jordan is now 
with the famous Christy at Saranac Lake, suffering from lung 
trouble. The following is an extract from a letter from "Al" 
to Mr. Glass, the Graduate Manager: "The doctors tell me 
that my condition was excited by kicks which I received while 
playing football. Three weeks ago the doctors gave nie 
three days to live, but I decided they were wrong and fought 
the old fight and am steadily improving." We hear that "Al" 
will have to stay at Saranac for at least three more years. 
Senior Council decided that just as the New York fans 
showed their appreciation of the honor "Big Six" brought 
to their city, so should we Bucknellians express our appre- 
ciation of the honors which "Al" Jordan brought to Bucknell. 
One of the few Bucknell players who have received Ail- 
American honors is calling you. Will you answer? 

The ushers will come through the stands between the 
halves to collect your contribution. Eemember your response 
will show "Al" that Bucknell is for her warriors now and 
forever. 

"AL" JORDAN TESTIMONIAL COMMITTEE 
OF SENIOR COUNCIL. 



It is our ambition to publish each year at least one "Per- 
sonal" of every Bucknellian. Last year we fell far short of 
it. Will you help us this year to make our dream come true 
by dropping us a card with the first item about yourself? 



BUCKNELL TRADITIONS 



When did the planting of the class-ivy originate and when 
did it cease? When did the custom of conferring the senior 
mantle upon the .iunior class begin — when did it end? Who 
was the originator of Cap-night and when did freshmen first 
sleep with their shoes on? When was the "Alumni Blue" 
first worn? 

The Monthly is planning an article on Bucknell tradi- 
tions, in which these questions shall so far as possible be 
answered. Any alumnus who has information on the origin 
of these or other Bucknell student traditions and customs is 
urged to co-operate by telling us what he knows. 



THE MONTHLY MAIL BAG 

November 10, 1921. 
My Dear Sir: 

In answer to your letter, requesting the cuts of Christy 
Mathewson to be used in the Mathewson Testimonial Program, 
will say that you cannot either rent or buy them, but I will 
loan them to you with more pleasure than I can tell you if 
it is, in any way, going to let the public know the high 
character of the man Mathewson is. 

I have known him for twenty years intimately and he 
is surely a man to the marrow and Bucknell should be and, 
of course, is justly proud of him. 

Yours very trul.y, 

HARRY M. STEVENS. 



AN OMISSION 

Through an unpardonable oversight on the part of the 
Editor, the names of Mrs. Theron Clark and Mrs. N. F. 
Davis :were omitted from the list of new faculty members 
published in the October issue. Mrs. Clark has charge of 
several sections in freshman mathematics, Mrs. Davis is as- 
sisting in the work in biologry. 



October 12, 1921. 
Dear Bucknell Alumni Monthly: 

It occurred to me that, although I can't be one of the home- 
comers this week-end, I could send you my check for the 
ensuing year and assure you of my continued interest 
in our Alma Mater. Very truly yours, 

MARY M. MOLL, 'OG. 
Continued on Page Three) 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



^■iilii«ii«ii» 11 <■.»■■»■■«-»■■■-■■■■■■ I 



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The Homecoming 



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Was- Bucknell's first Home-coming a success? Ask any 
one of the hundreds of alumni whose names appear else- 
where in this issue. Don't ask us, for we're prejudiced. 
We judge altogether hy the comments of the comparatively 
few with whom we talked. Maybe we didn't see the dis- 
appointed ones. But this guess we will venture — that never 
a man or a woman of those old-timers who were here over 
the week-end of October 15 but will pawn his college diploma 
or his best suit to come again next year. 



EARLY BIRDS 



Impatient ones came early. By mid-week a fair sprinkling 
of grads — chiefly of the vintages of '20 and '21 — was here. 
On Thursday and Friday the number swelled rapidly. By 
Friday evening the fraternity houses were buzzing with 
the yarns the oldsters were spinning, the Women's College 
had hung out a big S. E. O. sign and many Lewisburg 
homes were witnessing boisterous reunions among friends 
who had not seen each other for years. 



THE MASS MEETING 



Commencement Hall was just big enough to accommodate 
the crowd at the big mass-meeting on Friday evening. If 
anything was needed to put the final edge on the team it 
was the vote of confidence registered by every speaker and 
echoed in the cheering — which reminded one of that last year 
which Sherwood Eddy called the best he had ever heard at 
any college. President Hunt, Professor C. A. Lindemann, '98, 
Professor H. T. Colestock, '96, Dr. E. M. West, '89, and Mr. 
B. F. Thomas, '98, spoke for the hill and town, while Dr. 
Maurice Goldsmith, '06, Victor B. Luchsinger, ex-'08, F. P. 
MacDermott, '21, A. E. Mathieson, '20, spoke for the alumni. 

The banner awarded by the Y. M. C. A. for the best 
Bucknell parody on a popular song was presented to "Dinty" 
Moore, '23, of Pitman, N. J. 



SATURDAY MORNING 



From an early hour burg and hill were alive with grins 
carrying behind them the faces of perhaps the happiest 
crowd that ever came back to the old campus. And why 
not? Pennsylvania October had unrolled a day of autumn 
splendor ; there were dozens of old friends to greet and clap on 
the shoulder ; there were the visible improvements on the 
campus to visit and discuss; there was the prospect of the 
biggest football game ever played on the athletic field. 

The early afternoon trains brought crowds of rooters, 
while some few belated ones motored in just as the game 
began. 



THE CROWD 



The preparations made for seating the spectators proved 
just adequate and no more. The hill-side grandstand had 
been built up to accommodate four thousand, and every seat 
was filled. The eighteen hundred reserved seats were gone 
before the game began. The north side bleaehers, seating 
over a thousand, were reserved for the Lafayette rooters 
and were crowded. It was a typical football crowd, good- 
natured, but impatient for the game to begin. 



THE GAME 

And what a game it was — tense from start to finish. The 
keen excitement of the scoreless first quarter — the breathless 
suspense during Butler's 90-yar(l flash across the field — the 
explosion of joy at the touchdown which followed — the grim 
tensity as the Orange and Blue yielded slowly to the Lafay- 
ette assault in the second half — the desperate hope as Bucknell 
unleashed her open attack in the last minutes — every mo- 
ment was a thrill such as only a hard-fought college foot- 
ball game can create. 



THE RECEPTION 



Although the late hour at which the game ended pre- 
vented some who were anxious to leave early from attending 
the reception at the Women's College, many alumni took 
advantage of the opportunity to get acquainted with the 
college women of today, and thoroughly enjoyed the hos- 
pitality of Dean Carey and the college senior girls, who 
acted as hostesses. The reception rooms were charmingly 
decorated with autumn leaves and the best of spirits pre- 
vailed. 



BUCKNELL'S FIRST GAME OF FOOTBALL 

Dear Editor: 

The game on Saturday calls to mind the very first game 
of football played by Bucknell University. It was in 1883 — 
thirty-eight years ago. The opposing team was Lafayette. 
The game was played on Thanksgiving Day. At Saturday's 
game were three spectators who played a conspicuous part 
in the game of thirty-eight' years ago. These were Captain 
Carl Law, '83, who played at halfback; Eolfe Gerhart, ex-'85, 
who played fullback, and Myron J. Sherwood, ex-'S6. 
quarterback in the old game . whose son is a freshman in col- 
lege today. The right halfback in the game was John Owens, 
a brother of Professor Owens. The line was really a very 
powerful one, physically speaking, made up of Shipman, 
Bear, Herman, Edwards, Davies, who also has a son in col- 
lege today, Davidson and C. Gerhart. "Tommie" Currin was 
the lone substitute. 

The fullback on the Lafayette team was not only a fa- 
mous football player in 1883, but during the World's War he 
became a famous soldier in the American Army. I refer 
to General March. 

College football was new then. Bucknell indeed had 
never played it, nor even seen it played. With a green set 
of men she began training for the game about two weeks be- 
fore it occurred. She had no coach. There was not a man 
on the campus who knew anything at all about the game 
except what he had read. Lafayette had a good team — 
trained and tried in a number of college battles. Little won- 
der then that in the first half of the game she scored 44 
points on Bucknell, whose men did not seem to know just 
what to do. However, Lafayette scored only 15 points in the 
second half, and a number of these were from a field goal 
kicked by Fullback March. 

Outsiders of course were interested only a little. There 
were no college colors, no songs, no yells, no college girls, 
on cheer leaders, no band, no seats, no roped -in grounds, 
no automobiles. Expenses of the game were for the most 
part paid out of contributions. 

Taking it all in all it certainly was a tame affair com- 
pared with the great football event of Saturday, but it was 
the beginning which put Bucknell on the football map, 
where today she looms up strong among the mighty. 

W. 0. B. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



Dr. Joseph Kerr Weaver~A Man Under Authority 



By William E. Martin 



One came to the Great Physician asking aid for his 
servant, and in his desire to cause little trouble, explained 
: that he too, the speaker, "was a man under authority," in 
his realm, even as the Physician, who needed only "to speak 
the word, and his servant would be healed!" Dr. Weaver 
was "a man under authority." His earliest loyalty was to a . 
home in which he learned the virtues and amenities which 
iparked his entire career. One of a family of ten, of varied 
interests and talents, he learned a cheerful obedience, a 
genuine self-denial, a strict economy, a tireless industry, a 
filial honor, a truthfulness and a gentility to be had in no 
other school than in such a home. Here he also acquired a 
distinguished regard for womanhood, which gi'ew in daily 
association with the Christian Mother who added to all her 
toil for her family, the grace of her loving effort for the 
mental and moral nurture of her children. "Happy he 
with such a mother!" sings the Poet in a paean of praise: 
may we not add, "Happy the mother with such a son I" 

Into that family in the "Forties" and "Fifties" of the 
Ninetenth century, came many an influence formative of 
youth, even as angels from the unseen but ever real world 
of spirit. Guests came from the great outside who learned 
to love the lad, so responsive to every appeal of the ideals 
of the true, the beautiful, and the good. The benignant 
presence and comradeship of a William Shadrach, a George 
M. Spratt, and many another servant of the same Master, 
tarrying but for a Lord's Day service, or for a "protracted 
meeting," but leaving behind them tracings on the memorj' 
of the young student never to be effaced. Into his family, as 
brothers-in-law, came two men of distinguished influence 
upon his future career — Eev. Peter M. Weddell, long one 
of Ohio's most helpful, as he was most revered, ministers, 
whose son, Eev. John Weaver Weddell, DJ)., survives and 
was present at his uncle's funeral. The other was Eev. 
Thomas J. Penny, an eloquent and successsful minister in 
the West, whose wife has long survived her husband, and 
now resides in California. 

Dr. Weaver's preparation for College included excellent 
instruction by Professor Chalfant and Dr. Woodend of the 
Presbyterian church, in the Saltsburg Academy; so that he 
was admitted to sophomore standing in the "University at 
Lewisburg" in 1858, and was graduated Bachelor of Arts 
with the class of 1861. His faculty here included President 
Loomis, Dr. Bliss, Dr. James, and Professor Tustin. So the 
authority of knowledge was gained, and characterized his 
entire life thenceforward. "Knowledge comes, but wisdom 
lingers" ; but to the devoted student, wisdom seldom lingers 
long; with Dr. Weaver she soon took up her permanent abode. 

The authority of service presently arrived to guide life's 
vocation, and the j'outhful Ba/'helor or Arts aspired to the 
higher degree of Doctor of Medicine. The writer well re- 
members the modest office of Dr. Eeddick, in which the 
neophyte began the study of Galen and Hippocrates — too 
soon to be interrupted by the loud alarum of the war-drum. 
A higher duty claimed a new authority, and Lieutenant 
Weaver of Company D, 135th P. V., under Colonel Porter 
of Indiana, and Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Weaver, a younger 
brother of Dr. J. K. Weaver, were en route to join General 
Hooker's division of the Union army. The regimental 
surgeon was Dr. W. H. Marr, of Lewisburg, father of the 
writer's classmate. Prank S. Marr, Esq., deceased, of the 
class of 1871. The term of enlistment, nine months, having 
expired, the young medical student returned to his studies, 
onlj' to be summoned to the defense of his own common- 
wealth against Lee's invasion. This time it was Captain 
J. K. Weaver who enlisted with his company in the emer- 
gency army. But the ideal of the Captain was not war, 
but peace. War was incidental, accidental: the true objective 
was peace. To America's everlasting credit, her successful 
General said: "Let us have peace!" and Captain Weaver's 
military career, now only just begun, voiced General Grant's 
immortal dictum. The authority of patriotism was supreme 
in the minds and hearts of both — as in the minds and hearts 
of the citizens and soldiers of the North. 

True as the needle to the Pole, the purpose of his chosen 
profession enlisted his strenuous pursuit, and, in 1867, the 
diploma of Jefferson Medical College attested the right of 
our student to practice medicine, with the new authority 
of science, no less than of self -consecration to the healing 
art. At the Norristown funeral, Dr. Arnold, pupil and asso- 
ciate of Dr. Weaver in the 'Montgomery County Medical 
Society, told the vast audience of distinguished friends at 
what cost of time and devotion Dr. Weaver kept up con- 
tinuous study of journals and reports to his latest years. 



Here his emphasis was not upon disease — the transient foe 
to humanity — but upon health, the true ideal and object of 
the physician. Thus it came to pass that sanitation engrossed 
his attention. Aware of the vital importance of this side of 
his professional duty and opportunity, he was deeply in- 
terested in hospital work, and in his relation to the National 
Guard of Pennsylvania as surgeon general. At the obsequies. 
President Emeritus Dr. John H. Harris, of Bucknell, recalled 
the thrilling incident of the scourge of Camp Alger, during 
the preparation for the Spanish-American War; when Dr. 
Weaver, as a visitor, saw cause and cure at a glance, gave 
directions, which were obeyed as if they had been the 
voice of the War Department — ^^vhen, in reality, they were the 
orders of the trained expert in sanitation — and brought to 
a speedj' end an epidemic of typhoid fever that had baffied 
medical skill, but yielded to the authority of the strong and 
decided man who knew. Is it any wonder that, commencing 
with Governor Hartranft, every Governor of his native state 
has appointed and re-appointed Dr. Weaver upon his staff, 
until the latest recognition ranked him as "Brigadier General 
of Volunteers!" 

Not less valuable, though in another sphere, were his 
services in the Grand Army of the Eepublie. Until the 
period of the World War, this organization st-ood out in 
human history as a crowning achievement of democracy. To 
unify men of all ranks in a common fellowship, in a sacred 
memory, in mutual respect, and in high aspirations for na- 
tional unity; to cultivate genuine fraternity and true benev- 
olence — this has been an achievement worthy of the people 
who suffered the agonies of 1861-1865 to fulfill the aims of 
the great president whose words at Gettysburg shall remain 
the possession of all liberty lovers, in all the future. 

Dr. Weaver's share in this organization was one manifesta- 
tion of his remarkable genius for friendship. How manifold 
its phases, from his affection for the children of his neigh- 
borhood, to his courteous treatment of the aged; from his 
devotion to the sharer of his every thought and emotion, to 
his tender concern for the gray-haired comrade of the Six- 
ties, with the button on the coat lapel, — from his faithful and 
considerate regard for his fellow alumni, trustees, religious 
boards, medical men, army officials — indeed all associates, 
early friends, companions in travel, or latest acquaintances — 
surely every one of the seven colors of the spectrum of love 
was clearly visible in the conduct, the confidence, the cour- 
tesy, and the fraternity of this friend of friends. 

But this figure of the spectrum indicates only the visible 
light. Beyond the violet rays and below the red rays is a 
new world of invisible light. In the commendation of His 
friends who were truly happy, the great Physician-teacher 
included all the rays, both visible and invisible, when He 
pronounced these friends of His "the light of the World!" 
So our friend was a man under the authority of faith, a 
realm in which all the excellences of the personal, the pro- 
fessional, the social, the educational, the official life found 
their explanation and their perfection. Here again the true 
form of Dr. Weaver's inner life asserted its proper power 
and function. To "do the will was to know the doctrine." 
No inversion in the order, the sequence, disturbed our 
thought of his religious life; no strife between faith and 
works ; no dogmatism dominant ; no abstraction of life from 
reality; no seclusion of self from the world, in order to its 
self-purification. Thirty-eight years' superintendency of the 
Sunday School attests continuity of service. Add to the 
duration the quality of preparation, the ideals of true re- 
sults, that morning hour held sacred from professional calls — 
save only in instances of dire necessity — and you have some 
conception of the method and philosophy of this active ex- 
ponent of Christian nurture. Experience in the realm of 
religion, with Dr. Weaver, was a genuine product in the 
laboratory of life; it was faith in action. The invisible por- 
tions of the spectrum of life's light were as real as the 
visible seven-chorded colors of the rainbow. Instead of con- 
flict between the seen and the unseen, there was perfect 
liarmony. All the authorities were merged in the ineffable 
authority of love divine. This is not something at war with 
human faculties, but is the unit.v and perfection of them all. 
Dr. Weaver's religious life and activity ma3' be confidently 
commended to all young people who have difficulty in har- 
monizing science and religion, or in adjusting faith and 
works. He lived such harmonious adjustment by action. 

Dr. Weaver's contribution to his Alma Mater, and so to 
the cause of education, was pre-eminently the gift of his own 
life and work, outvalueing money; the loyal devotion of a 

(Continued on Page Five) 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



8 i^ M > »» ia«aMa M t..««. #■«•**•" 



"Matty's" Day 



TO MATTY 

"So long as baseball games are played 
So long as fans the glory sing 
Of all the ablest of your trade 
They'll name you as the pitching king." 

—Walter Trumbull. 

"Matty's influence on baseball was far-reaching. He was 
a player whose deportment on the field was a splendid ex- 
ample in sportsmanship to the youth of tlie land, wlio placed 
him on a hero's pedestal. His conduct in victory and defeat 
was an excellent influence on his fellow-players.'' — Harry 
Cross. 

"He had brains and courage, skill and stamina, .judgment 
and power, and beyond this a lofty idealism both on and 
oflf the field. No other pitclier tliat ever lived, with all the 
great ones, ever carried so many qualities for enduring fame 
or held the admiration of a greater host." — Grantland Rice. 

"Matty was, in my estimation, the greatest pitcher in all 
time, but it was not Matty, the pitcher, who won us ; it 
was Matty, the Man. He is typical of the best that baseball 
stands for, and in the minds of the younger generation Matty 
means baseball of tlie cleanest, liighest type." — Hugh S. 
Fullerton. 

These brief extracts, taken almost at random from the 
dozens of tributes paid by eminent sports writers to Big Six 
in the "Christy Mathewson Testimonial" official program, is- 
sued for the game on September 30, are typical of the nature 
of the comment. Certainly no baseball player ever had 
higher praise. 

"No more heartfelt ajid spontaneous tribute to a ball 
player could have been devised tlian that which was accorded 
at the Polo Grounds yesterday afternoon to one of the great- 
est — many think the greatest pitchers of all time, Christopher 
Mathewson. Players who were Mathewson's associates in the 
great days of his career and players of the champion Giants of 
today joined with 20,000 fans in a demonstration of admira- 
tion and affection for the man whose name has always been 
a synonym for skill, tameness, and integrity on the dia- 
mond." So the New York Times speaks of tlie five-inning 
game between the team-mates of Cliristy and tlie present 
Giant team, which netted $20,925 for the testimonial fund. 

To the great joy of the fans, the old-timers won the game 
by a score of 2-0. Bresuahan, Warner, Tenney, Merklc, Gil- 
bert, Burkett, Dahlen, Devlin, Lobert, Murray, Doyle, Wiltse, 
Tesreau, are the familiar names of the oldsters, with one 
still more familiar to Bucknellians — Harry "Moose" McCor- 
mick, ex-'O-l, of yore celebrated pinch-hitter of the Giants, 
who attested his still remaining skill with a hit and a run 
and five put-outs in the center garden. 

In the interval between this game and tlie regular Giant- 
Brave encounter scheduled for the afternoon the baseball 
autographed by President Harding and other celebrities was 
auctioned off to Truly Warner for $750, while another with 
Hans Wagner's signature brought $250. 

A telegram from Christy himself to the committee in 
charge of the game read: 

"On this day of days at the Polo Grounds I am glad to 
send heartiest greetings to my baseball friends. It is abso- 
lutely impossible for me to put into words my feeling of 
pleasure and gratitude at the manner in which the New 
York club and friends of baseball are honoring me, but it 
certainly is good to have friends who do not forget and who 
remember so substantially. With such support I cannot fail 
to win my game. Here is hoping that the Giants win 
theirs." 

The game and the testimonial movement have attracted 
nation-wide attention, and the many encomiums heaped upon 
Matty by newspapers and magazines attest the universal 
conviction that he has been, as he is termed in the Testi- 
monial program, "a gentleman, sportsman, soldier, and New 
York's foremost baseball figure of all time." 




"BIG SIX 



(Courtesy of Mr. Harry M. Stephens) 



DR. JOSEPH KERR WEAVER— A MAN 
UNDER AUTHORITY 

(Continued from Page Four) 
worthy son through sixty graduate years; faithful and un- 
tiring service upon her board of trustees for thirty-one years; 



contributions to her funds, according to her necessities, and 
proportionate to his resources; and, in company with Mrs. 
Weaver, the "Weaver Scholarships," providing assistance to 
worthy young people in securing an education, else, possibly, 
denied them. Mrs. Weaver's loyal and practical interest in 
the work of the Bucknell Alumnae was reciprocated by Dr. 
Weaver's kindly interest in Ursinus, the college not only 
of their county, but also of her denomination. The joy of 
both in this generous rivalry may be repeated in thousands 
of homes of divergent interest, by imitation of these mag- 
nanimous friends of the young. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



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Alumni Activities 



*2» <•*••«•< 



Shreve, '84, Heads 

Important Committee 

A special from Washington states 
that Representative Milton W. Shreve, 
of the 25th. Penn'a district, one of the 
three ranking men on the House Appro- 
priations committee^ has been made 
chairman of the sub-committee of com- 
merce and labor. This sub-committee 
is one of the mose important divisions 
of the general committee, and the selec- 
tion of Mr. Shreve for the chairmanship 
indicates the high rank he holds in the 
counsels of the Republican party. It 
is very pleasing news to his many 
friends in the district, and in this sec- 
tion especially. — ^Cambridge Springs 
News. 



-^v- 



Dr. Ziegler Urges 



Curb on Alcohol 



Dr. S. Lewis Ziegler, '80, in an ad- 
dress before the House of Delegates of 
the State Medical Society on October 
4, described wood alcohol as the most 
ileadly poison of commerce, and urged 
the prohibition of its manufacture. 

Should this prove impossible of en- 
actment, he advccated the coloring of 
it in such a way as to make its iden- 
tification certain and the use of labels 
reading: "Poisor ; drinking, breathing, 
or rubbing on skin may cause blindness 
or death." 

All of Dr. Ziegler's recommendations 
were embodied in -i resolution passed 
by the House of Delegates. 



-<S>- 



Weddings 

Tilton — Mahoney. 
Charles Eugene Tilton, '16, and Miss 
Mabel Mahoney were married at the 
home of the bride in Milford, Conn., 
October first. C. Walter Lotte, '14, 
was best man. Other Bucknellians in 
attendance were Miss Margaret Lotte, 
'21, Carl Geiger, '15, Clinton I. Sprout, 
'17, and Mrs. Louise Hahn Sprout, 'IS. 
They will be at home in Newark, N. J. 
after November first. 

Rooke — Withington. 
Robert L. Rooke, '13, and Miss Alice 
Clement Withington were married at 
eight o'clock, Saturday evening, Oct- 
ober 15, at the First Presbyterian Ch- 
urch of Sunbury. The wedding was 
followed by a reception at the home 
of Mrs. Rooke's uncle and aunt. Gen- 
eral and Mrs. Charles Clement. 

Wingert — Morrow 
A quiet church wedding was that of 
Mr. John Wingert, '15, and Miss Ada 
Lee Morrow, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. 
E. H. Morrow, of Altoona, at the Meth- 
odist Church, Saturday, October 15. 
The groom's father, John H. Wingert, 
'72, and Edwin Gundy, ex '06, were the 
Bucknellians in attendance. 



Pangbum, '12, To Coast 

Weaver W. Pangbum is on the Pacific 
Coast on a tour of inspection of the work 
of Community Service in that district 
and in search of young men and women 
to be trained for local Community Ser- 
vice positions. He is accompanied by 
Mrs. Pangburn and small son, Edward. 

An extract from a recent letter runs: 
"Interviews, committee meetings, viewing 
activities, making speeches, conferences, 
much riding by night in the deadly sleep- 
ing car ('flying ovens' according to Lord 
Northcliffe). It is not all work of course, 
for these Westerners are very hospitable. 
We expect to return East just in time 
to spend Christmas in good old Pennsyl- 
vania," Mr. Pangburn's Sacramento ad- 
dress is 920 Twenty-seventh street. 



-^ 



Deaths 

JULIET AIKEN-WHITE 

Juliet Aiken -White, from 1891 to 1906 
instructor in music, died in Pasadena, 
Cal., about October 10, of peritonitis, 
follomng an operation for appendicitis. 
Juliet Aiken will be remembered as a 
brilliant player on the piano and a tire- 
less worker as a teacher. After her 
marriage to Mr. White a home was set 
up in Pasadena. Mr. White died about 
eight years ago but Mrs. White lived 
on in California with her mother. Now 
the aged mother is left without a near 
relative. With the passing of Juliet 
Aiken our world has lost a bright and 
happy spirit. 

Dr. Edith Hedges-Matzke, from 1885 
to 1888 instructor in elocution, has ac- 
cepted a position in the science depart- 
ment of the University of Missouri. 

ROBERT L. JONES, '10 

Eobert L. Jones, of the class of 1910, 
died suddenly in Franklin on Sunday 
evening, October 9. Death was prob- 
ably due to heart failure. 

Robert Lyness Jones was born in 
Franklin, the son of Richard E. and 
Elizabeth Fleming Jones. After grad- 
uating from the Franklin High School 
he entered Bucknell, graduating in civil 
engineering in 1910. During the World 
War he enlisted as a private in Company 
F, 16th Pennsylvania Infantry, and was 
soon promoted to corporal, later to ser- 
geant. When the company went to Camp 
Hancock he was sent to officers' training 
school, and before going overseas was 
commissioned second lieutenant. At the 
front he was advanced to a first lieu- 
tenancy. 

In July, 1917, he was married to 
Georgia Kurtz, Bucknell cx-'16, who sur- 
vives him, as does an infant daughter, 
Rutli Annis. 

"Bob" Jones was popular in college as 
at home for his kindly and generous dis- 
position. He was a member of Phi 
Gamma Delta Fraternity. 




Theory and Practice of Advertising, 
by George W. Wagenseller, Revised ed- 
ition, Wagenseller Publishing House, 
Middleburg, Pa. 1920. In this new 
edition of his elementary book on 
advertising, George W. Wagenseller, 
'92, reviews rapidly and concisely 
in fifty lessons the elements of advertis- 
ing as it is practised to-day. Drawing 
from his twenty-six years of experience 
in a printing office, Mr. Wagenseller, 
who has been characterised in Bing's 
"The Country Weekly" as "the most 
successful publisher of a small-town pa- 
per in the United States,"explains sim- 
ply and briefly the A.B.C. of this mod- 
ern art. Each lesson is supplemented by 
a practical problem embodying the 
point made in that particular lesson. 
The book contains also appendices il- 
lustrating type series and advertising 
make-up. 



The Mint of the Philippine Islands, 
by Gilbert S. Perez. The American 
Numismatic Society, New York, 1921 
(No. 8 in Numismatic Notes and Mon- 
ographs.) This monograph by Gilbert 
S. Perez, '07, gives the history of the 
establishment of the first colonial mint 
of the United States, which was opened 
at Manila, July 15, 1920, and a survey 
of its present equipment and manner of 
operation. The pamphlet is illustrated 
with excellent photographs of the var- 
ious departments of the Mint and of 
the medal which was struck to com- 
memorate the opening. 



Charles Bromley, '09, has an article 
entitled "The Pacific Conference" in the 
"Baptist" of October 15th. In the ar- 
ticle Mr. Bromley points out the im- 
possibility of success without an at- 
tempt to right wrongs committed in 
the past by European nations in the 
Orient. 



The same issue of "The Baptist" con- 
tains an article by Dr. Samuel Zane 
Batten entitled " Brotherhood in Pra- 
gue", in which the author reviews con- 
ditions in the new republic of Czecho- 
slovakia. The article is an outcome 
to Dr. Batten's recent studies while 
a delegate at the World Brotherhood 
Congress in Prague. 



In "The Baptist" of October 8, Rev. 
R. G. Pierson, '01, of Zanesville, Wis., 
tells how he makes use of motion pic- 
tures in church work, and what success 
he has attained by their use. 

(Continued on Page Seven) 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



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i " « " » " » " » — ■■■■■>■■»•■• — -•■•♦">•••■•• " • " •-• " •■■■■■■ " ■' * •' ■ " ' 



Alumni Organizations 



»>>«»«»*»«-»-*»fi 



»..#»•»••••-•• 



Pittsburgh Alumni Banquet 

The members of the team were guests 
of honor at the banquet of the Pitts- 
burgh alumni held at the Fort Pitt 
Hotel the night of the Washington and 
Jefferson game. Almost two hundred 
were in attendance, and though the at- 
mosphere was less exuberant than would 
have been the case had the score been 
reversed, good cheer and Bucknell fel- 
lowship prevailed. The speakers were 
the Hon. Adam M. Wyant, ex-'94, of 
Greensburg; Carl C. Law, '85, of Pitts- 
burgh; R. G. Bostwick, '05, of Pitts- 
burgh; Coach Reynolds, and Captain 
Arda Bowser. 



-^>- 



Cliicago Alumni News 

The second picnic of the Chicago 
Alumni Club, planned for the twenty- 
fourth of September, was a failure. The 
reason was that the "weather-man" sent 
rain that day. We had had many replies 
to our cards and expected a large crowd. 

Mrs. Winnie Dickson Hardgrove, class 
of 1910, has been visiting Mr. and Mrs. 
Jonathan Wolfe. 

Mr. and Mrs. F. H. Fahringer, 1915, 
have moved to 9028 Houston Avenue, 
Chicago. 

Mis Marion Kiess, class of ex-'18, 
has returned to her home in William- 
sport. 

Miss Sue Weddell, 1912, will be away 
Prom Chicago until December. She is 
with the Y. W. C. A. and is out of town 
a great deal. 

Mrs. Mabel Slout Weeter, 1909, and 
family returned on the second of Oc- 
tober from a month's vacation. 

Mrs. Katharine Stein Dacus, Institute 
1911, lives at 8823 South Michigan ave- 
nue, Chicago. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jonathan Wolfe enter- 
tained some Bucknellians, on Saturday, 
October 1st, in honor of their guest, Mrs. 
Winnie Dickson Hardgrove, of Akron, O. 



-^^ 



The Alumni Council Organizes 

An enthusastic optimism over the 
possibilities of the Alumni Association 
under its new organization prevailed 
at the joint meeting of the Alumni 
Council and the Board of Managers on 
Home-coming Day. This optimism 
did not evaporate into thin air, how- 
ever, as so frequently happens, but was 
converted into a definitely outlined 
program for the year's work. 

The meeting was called to order by 
President C. C. Law, '85. Those pre- 
sent were: James A. Tyson, '11, of 
Harrisburg, Dr. Maurice Goldsmith, 
'06, of Pittsburgh, Anne White Gal- 
braith, '07, of Williamsport, Mabel 
Fritz, '18, of Reading, Charlemange T. 
Wolfe, '10, of Philadelphia, Mrs. C. A. 
Gundy, '90, of Lewisburg, Dr. Mary 
Wolfe, '96, of Laurelton, F. M. Simpson, 
'95, of Lewisburg, Leo L. Rockwell, '07, 
of Lewisburg. Several other delegates 
were in town but failed to appear. 

After a general discussion of policy 
for the year, in which it was agreed to 
stress the development of local clubs, 
the question of appointments to the 
various committees of the Association 
was taken up, and nominations were 
made by representatives of the various 
districts. These will be reviewed by 
the Board of Managers and the 
personnel of the committees announced 
in the near future. 



Lewisburg Alumni Elect Officers 

The fall meeting of the Lewisburg 
Alumni Club was held at the Lewisburg 
Club on September 27. The model 
local constitution recommended by the 
General Association was adopted and 
the following officers elected: Pres- 
ident, Leroy T. Butler, '98; Vice Pres- 
ident, W. Neil Baker, '11; Secretary- 
Treasurer, Claire Groover, '15. 
^ 

Bucknell Bookshelf 

(Continued from Page Six) 

Margaret Tustin O'Harra, Inst. '83, 
contributed to the Public Ledger 
"Church Forum" of September 26 an ap- 
preciation of the work in missionary ed- 
ucation of Lucy W. Peabody. In 
speaking of Mrs. O'Harra the Ledger 
says: "She is a leading spirit in the 
historic First Baptist Church and ac- 
tive in many organizations outside the 
church. In other words, she is one of 
Philadelphia's best citizens." 



-4^ 



Alumni Athletic 

Association Meeting 

A meeting of the Alumni Athletic 
Association held at the residence of 
President Hunt on Saturday evening 
made important decisions in respect to 
the athletic policy of the next few 
years. It was decided to send a cross- 
country team to the Middle Atlantic 
Championship meet at Easton, if a 
representative team can be developed. 
It was decided if possible to make a 
two-year foot-ball agreement with Le- 
high, inviting the Bethlehem eleven 
here for Home-coming Day next year, 
and if possible, to include six home 
games on next year's schedule. It 
was voted also to give the team two 
weeks preliminary training at the Nar- 
rows, west of Lewisburg. A member- 
ship campaign for the Alumni Athletic 
Association is to be initiated and a 
joint committee appointed to consider 
the feasibility of changing the proposed 
stadium site to the field lying between 
the back-road and the cemetery. 

Those present at the meeting were: 
Presidnt Hunt, Dr. Maurice F. Gold- 
smith, '06, Henry L. Fonda, '18, E. M. 
Heim, '93, John Davis, '02, George 
Cockill, '05, and R. W. Thompson, '04, 



The Season Advances 

Since the game with W. and J. 
at Washington the team has slow- 
ly been rounding into top season 
shape. With the little end of 

the score to our credit in the 
first game of the season the Orange 
and Blue warriors have begun to show 
the old time fight and the game with 
Muhlenberg that followed at AUentown 
gave evidence of the calibre of the el- 
even. Although the score of 14 to 
did not tell the whole story of that game 
it was easy to see that the team was 
beginning to hit its stride and with a 
few more practices would be ready for 
the big game with Lafayette. In the 
Muhlenberg game there was never any 
question as to the better team, for the 
local backs were plowing the opposing 
line almost at will. A heavy rain ac- 
companied by a strong wind made the 
field treacherous. Hall, who was break- 
ing in as half back, played a sterling 
game and was the first to score for the 
Orange and Blue this season. Shortly 
after the score he was injured and had 
to be removed from the game. The 
injury did not prove serious, although 
he was unable to enter into the game 
again. Bowser plunged thru tackle 
for big gains each time he carried the 
ball, for the line was opening up huge 
holes in the Muhlenberg defense. His 
kicking was the feature of the game for 
his long placements netted ten and 
twenty yard gains over the opposing 
kicks. 
LAFAYETTE 20 - BUCKNELL 7 

The day of the Lafayette game 
dawned bright and clear. The team 
was in good shape with the exception 
of one or two men who were suffering 
from minor injuries. When Lafayette's 
team came onto the field before the 
huge crowd which had assembled for 
the game, it was easily seen that a bet- 
ter team than Lafayette's heavy aggre- 
gation had not been seen on the local 
field for years. The local boys looked 
small in comparison, but what they 
lacked in weight they made up in fight. 
The following hour from the time the 
referee blew his whistle for the firgt 
kick-off the crowd was treated to a rare 
sight. The first quarter was as nearly 
a repetition of last year's game at Eas- 
ton as it was possible for it to be. When 
Bucknell won the ball, a first down came 
after a series of plunges and then an- 
other followed on top of it. The ball 
was soon within striking distance of the 
goal when it was lost thru a forward 
pass. The first quarter went to Buck- 
nell on play but no score was made on 
either side. The second quairter opened 
with the fight on in the shadow of our 
own goal. Lafayette lost the ball on a 
fumble and in a flash an Orange and 
Blue jerseyed figure was seen speeding 
across the white lines for a touchdown. 
The half ended with the score seven to 
nothing for Bucknell. 

The two great plays of the game 
(Continued on Page Nine) 



8 

m 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



Bucknell of Today 



k.«..«..a..aMa«i 



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The English Department 

Since last Septem- 
ber the English De- 
partment has enjoyed 
comfortable quarters 
on the second and 
third floors of the 
east wing of the Old 
Academy During 

the summer of 1920 
the interior of this 
building was remod- 
eled and refitted to 
meet the needs of a 
Professor steadily increasing 

Herold English registration. 

The building is centrally and pleasantly 
located among the beautiful Bucknell 
trees, which induce a calm and thought- 
ful mood favorable to the study and 
appreciation of the great authors. 
Indeed, this may be the very spot 
which Wordsworth and Coleridge 
dreamed about in 1795 as the site of 
their proposed ideal community on the 
banks of the Susquehanna. 

LARGE REGISTRATION. 
The total English registration for 
the current semester is about 800, dis- 
tributed as follows: 280 in freshman 
Rhetoric and Composition, 175 in 
sophomore Literature 130 freshmen 
and 70 sophomores, juniors, and seniors 
in Public Speaking, and 145 juniors 
and seniors in advanced courses in 
English Literature. 

The number of freshmen has been 
so large as to require special ar- 
rangements to care for them. The 
work of forty students in Public 
Speaking, not included above, has 
been postponed to next year; and 
Miss Lillian Russell, who holds a 
fellowship in Public Speaking, is 
teaching part time. To accommodate 
temporarily the overflow in freshman 
Rhetoric and Composition, for which 
eight sections were originally planned, 
two additional sections, with Mr. 
William H. Sugden and Mr. F. 
Sturgis Beers as instructors, have 
been organized. 

THE FRESHMAN YEAR. 
Recently some changes have been 
made in freshman Rhetoric. The work 
has been divided among the En- 
glish professors so that every one 
instructs at least one section; 
and besides the required three hours 
of class work a week, 
monthly conference 
periods for each stu- 
dent have been ar- 
ranged. For the 
benefit of students 
not qualified to pur- 
sue the regular colle- 
giate course, a sub- 
freshman section has 
been organized. 
Moreover, in order 
to enrich the regular 
Professor course, the Depart- 
Rockwell ment has purchased 
several hundred copies of selected En- 




glish classics for collateral reading, each 
freshman being required to read one 
every month. 

LIBRARY FUND. 

A year ago President Hunt secured 
from the Board of Trustees a special 
fund of $500 to be invested in recent 
English poetry, fiction, and drama. So 
far about three-fourths of the fund 
have been expended and the library 
stocks correspondingly increased and 
modernized. In order to replenish the 
library of English properly, there 
should be a fund of S300 to S500 avail- 
able annually. It is said that an En- 
glish library endowment of S5000 or 
■$10,000 would produce a real jubilee 
among the English instructors. 

THE MIRROR. 

The alumni wiU be gratified to learn 
that under the direction of the English 
Department THE BUCKNELL 
MIRROR, the undergraduate literary 
magazine, has been revived, and wiU be 
published five times during the schol- 
astic year, the first number to appear 
in October. The magazine, which re- 
ceives support from the student budget, 
will be edited by a board of seven 
students selected 

from the junior and 
senior classes, and 
will be managed by 
a senior with three 
assistants. The pre- 
sent editor-in-chief 
is Mr Finley Keech, 
and the manager is 
Mr. H. G. Florin. 
It is felt that the 
magazine will be a 
potent means of a- 
rousing a keener ap- 
preciation of litera- 
ture and of developing creative powers 
that might otherwise lie dormant. 
Since the magazine will contain a va- 
riety of original student contributions 
on all sorts of topics, the support of 
the alumni is cordially solicited. One 
dollar sent to the manager at Lewis- 
burg, Penna., will entitle you to a 
year's subscription. 

THE FACULTY. 
Within the past two years death and 
resignations have wrought fundamen- 
tal changes in the personnel of the En- 
g'ish Department. That prince of 
teachers and scholars. Dr. Enoch 
Perrine, now deceased and long en- 
deared to Bucknellians as Professor of 
English Literature, was succeeded a 
year ago by Professor Amos L. Herold 
of Washington and Lee, and Columljia 
L'niversities, and with teaching exper- 
ience in the University of Cincinnati 
and elsewhere. And just as Dr. David 
Jayne Hill passed from Bucknell to 
positions of greater responsibility and 
larger usefulness, so last spring Pro- 
fessor Charles C. Fries, while com- 




Professor 
Rassweiler 




plet^ng his doctoral 
studies at the Univer- 
sity of Michigan, re- 
ceived an invitation 
to join the English 
faculty of that insti- 
tution, and to accept 
it, he resigned from 
Bucknell. His place 
here has been taken 
by Associate Pro- 
fessor Owen G. 
Groves, a graduate 
Professor of Hamilton College, 

Groves New York, and of 

Columbia University, in both of which 
he has had teaching experience. Mr. 
Herbert Greenland, whose competency 
here as an instructor recently won him 
a similar position in the University of 
Michigan, has been succeeded by an- 
other Bucknell alumnus, Mr. Harry R. 
Warfel, who graduated in 1920, taught 
one year at the well-known St. John's 
Military Academy, and was a grad- 
uate student last summer at Columbia. 
The record and versatility of the other 
members of the English staff, Professor 
G. F. Rassweiler, who spends his va- 
cations as a Chautauqua lecturer, and 
Professor L. L. Rockwell, editor of this 
magazine, and Professor of both Ger- 
man and English, are too well known 
to need explanatory statements. 

ORGANIZATIONS. 

Within the last year Professor Rass- 
weiler has made two notable additions 
to the life of Bucknell students, both 
auxiliary to his work in Public Speak- 
ing. One was the installation here 
last spring of the Bucknell Chapter of 
the National Honrirary Debating Fra- 
ternity of the Tau Kappa Alpha, with 
Professor Rassweiler, Wm. H. Sudgen, 
Ellis S. Smith, Hobart D. Evans, Paul 
B. Cooley, Frank McGregor, A. L. 
Wheat, L. M. Kimball, Forest Dagle, 
and Finley Keech as charter members. 

The other, an outgrowth of Bucknell 
students' interest in and appreciation 
of dramatics, was the organization and 
installation of a Bucknell Chapter of 
Theta Alpha Phi, a national honorary 
dramatic fraternity, of which Professor 
Rassweiler is National Vice-President. 
The charter members were Harry R. 
Warfel, Martha Leiser, Elthera Corson, 
Francis F. Reamer, 
H. L. Heller.and G. F. 
Rassweiler. This 

fraternity proposes to 
specialize in the 
study and production 
of artistic dramas. 
Besides, at the sug- 
gestion of Professor 
Rassweiler and with 
cooperation of the 
other members of the 
English staff, there 
was organized last 
fall the Bucknell 
Lyceum, which is an undergraduate 
group or society open to any student 
(Continued on Page Nine) 




Mr. Warfel 



BUCKNELL ALU MNI MONTHLY. 

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The Campus 



^♦■• " •"•^• " •"• " ■ " • " • " • " •■■■■■•■■■ " ■■■• — •■• " •■■• " I 



Hill and Burg. 



Harold McGraw, of Philadelphia, was 
elected Editor-in-chief of this year's 
L'Agenda, and Samuel Rickard, of Phil- 
adelphia, Business Manager. 



Hilding Larson, '21, visited in town 
October 9. 



Lester Lighten, '20, Sales Engineer 
for the Exide Battery Co., Detroit, 
Miah., visited friends in Lewisburg. 



Professor Bromley Smith, '95, has 
accepted a professorship in Public 
Speaking at Otterbein College, Wester- 
ville, Ohio. He still maintains his 
Lewisburg home 



J. Nevin Bauman, '20, visited his 
Delta Sigma brothers several times 
before going to the University of Mich- 
igan to take graduate work in auto- 
motive engineering. "Nev" stopped off 
at W. and J. on his way west. 



J. R. Lowman, '21, Randall Stover, 
ex-'17, and Lawrence Henderson, ex-'16, 
spent several days in Lewisburg rec- 
ently. 



H. L. Fonda, '18, returned from the 
LTniversity of Va. Law School for Home- 
coming. Fonda has purchased an estate 
three miles from the university campus 
where he now makes his home. 



The Y.M.C.A. renewed its agreement 
with the Redpath-Brockway Lyceum 
Company for a course of entertainments 
during the winter. The dates and con- 
certs to be given are as follows: Nov- 
ember 19, Harold Procter, eminent 
American tenor and supporting artists; 
December 10, Montraville M. Wood, 
.scientific entertainer; January 26., Dr. 
Charles Zueblin, lecturer; and February 
27, The Great Lakes String Quartet. 



The following Pi Beta Phis spent sev- 
eral days with their fraternity sisters; 
Mrs. Lewis Theiss, of Muncy, Helen 
Brown Lindys, '17, of Morristown N. 
J., Helen Horton Evans, '17, of Mad- 
erson, N. J., Marjorie Nechols, ex '24, 
Clarks Summit and Phillis Ottmyer, 
ex '24, York. 



The Engineering Building will be un- 
der roof by the middle of this month. 
The carpenters are working rapidly to 
get the roof in place before cold weather 
sets in so that they may proceed with 
the interior without delay. The Auto- 
mobile Laboratory in the basement 
will be used about the fifteenth of Nov- 
ember. 

(Continued on Page Ten) 



Representative Undergraduates 




S. Perry Rogers, '22, editor-in-chief 
of the Bucknellian, prepared at the Nor- 
ristown High School. In college he 
has been active in literary and musical 
organizations, having been a member 
of the College Orchestra, the Glee Club, 
the Bucknell Band, the L'Agemda 
Board, and the Bucknellian staff. 

He is taking the Arts course, pre- 
paring for medicine. 




Finley Keech, of Netcong, N. J., elec- 
ted to the senior presidency, pre- 
pared for Bucknell at the Dover High 
School. In college he has been active in 
various organizations, being a member 
of the Ministerial Association, the Glee 
Club, and the 'Varsity Debate Team. 
He was the editor of the 1922 L'Agenda 
and was recently selected as editor-in 
chief of the newly established "Buck- 



The English Department 

who wishes to drill himself in public 
exercises and to cultivate a more in- 
telligent appreciation of the fine 
things in music, literature and public 
speaking. From late fall to early 
spring weekly meetings are held; and 
last year the attendance was large and 
well sustained. Sometimes outside 
speakers and entertainers are secured. 
NEW COURSES. 
Although somewhat handicapped by 
a teaching staff really small in compar- 
ison with that of most colleges aiid 
universities of the same size as Buck- 
nell, the English Department, in spite 
of the heavy demands made by large 
classes in freshman and sophomore re- 
quired work, has nevertheless been able 
recently to add a few courses for the 
benefit of juniors and seniors. Among 
these are a course in the Modern 
Drama of Europe and America, recent 
English and American Prose and Poet- 
ry (not including the drama), a second 
course in Victorian Literature, Dante 
in an English translation to be studied 
in connection with Milton's epic Mas- 
terpieces, and a new course in 
Advanced Interpretation. As soon as 
the number of the teaching staff is in- 
creased, the English Department will 
be able to offer additional new courses. 
® 

The Season Advances 

(Continued from Page Seven) 
came in the first quarter. The first was 
an attempt by Bowser for a field goal 
from the 60-yard line. The angle was 
difficult, for the ball was close to 
the side lines. One of the most beauti- 
ful kicks ever seen on the field followed. 
The ball sailed high and far, and went 
wide of the mark by a rnatter of a few 
feet. It was so close to the mark 
that it was difficult to tell from the 
stands whether it had gone over or not, 
but the officials decided that it had mis- 
sed. Lafayette then began a march 
down the field from the 20-yard line 
Within the five-yard line Bucknell put 
up one of the greatest fights of the year. 
For four downs the two teams retained 
the same relative position. The ball 
shifted a few feet to the left or right of 
the center. On the fourth down the 
ball was declared over the line. La- 
fayette failed to kick the goal, leaving 
the score at the end of the third quarter 
7 to 6 in favor of the Orange and Blue. 
In the fourth quarter the tide of battle 
began to change. Lafayette with new 
and fresh men in the line and back-field 
to replace worn fatigued men had the 
advantage of the Orange and Blue, 
which was unable to call on second 
string men because of injuries. 
Two scores resulted in the fourth quar- 
ter which placed the game in hands of 
the Eastonians. The final score stood 
20 to 7 in favor of Lafayette. 

nell Mirror". He is a member of Gam- 
ma Lambda Sigma Fraternity. 

He is taking the Arts course in 
preparation for the ministry. 



10 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



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1873 

By a regrettable error John William 
Hague of this class was reported in the 
October issue as being a member of the 
class of 1865. 

1883 
Letitia Mathews, Inst. 83, resides at 
610 Fifth St., North St. Petersburg, 
Florida. 

1884 
The Rev. F. W. Overhiser is pastor 
of a church at New Castle, Del. 
1888 
Dr. Samuel Zane Batten returned 
late in September from his study of 
social conditions in Europe. 
1882 
Robert Melville Hunsicker has been 
appointed pastor-at-large of the 
Northumberland Baptist Association. 
1891 
Alraon O. Stevens is a Congrega- 
tional minister located at Austin, 
Texas. His address is 1409 Nueces St. 

Hill and Burg. 

(Continued from Page Nine) 

The Glee Club reorganized for the 
ensuing year and elected Ralph Hartt 
manager. The manager is planning a 
trip for the first week in November so 
as to get the club into Annapolis in 
time to help the football team win the 
Navy game. Other trips tentatively 
out-lined for the year are: Thanks- 
giving trip to Danville, Wilkes-Barre, 
Scranton, Paterson, and New York; 
Christmas trip, Harrisburg, Connells- 
viUe, Pittsburgh, Erie, Buffalo, Knox- 
ville. Canton; Easter trip, Pottstown, 
Pitman, Glassboro, Chadd's Ford, and 
Bridgeton. 

The club sent a double quartet to the 
Baptist convention at Franklin, Pa., 
October 16-18. 



Editor-in-chief S. Perry Rogers of the 
Bucknellian announced the following 
appointments to the staff: News Ed- 
itor, John C. Koch, '23, Sports, A. 
Herbert Haslam, '23, Alumni, W. H. 
Sudgen, '22, Women's Col. Amorita 
Sessinger, '22, Exchanges, Mary E. 
ShoU, '22, "Joe KoUum," Carmault 
Jackson, '22. 



Henry Clay Lucas '20 and wife visit- 
ed friends and relatives in Lewisburg. 



The semi-annual conference of the 
Intercollegiate Newspaper Association 
of the Middle Atlantic States was held 
at Bucknell October twenty-ninth. 
Twenty-five Pennsylvania, New York, 
New Jersey, and Maryland College 
papers comprise the group. 



The Y.M.C.A. is refurnishing the large 
room on the first floor of West Col- 
lege for use as a reading and lounging 
room. Trophy cases to preserve ath- 
letic awards are being built. Previous- 
ly the trophies were kept in the athletic 
office. 

(Continued on Page Twelve) 



1892 

Dr. E. S. Corson, President of the 
Cumberland County professional guild, 
recently read a paper before the so- 
ciety entitled, "The Narcotic Situa- 
tion". Dr. Corson is also Recorder 
for the County Medical Association. 

Dean Llewellyn Phillips was Buck- 
nell's representative at the inaugural 
of Dr. John M. Thomas as President 
of Pennsylvania State College. 
1894 

Grace Guthrie is teacher of Latin 
in New York City, residing at 610 
West 116th. St. 

1896 
Seceretary, H. T. Colestock, Lewisburg. 

Dr. Mary M. Wolfe addresed the 
State Federation of Women at their 
annual meeting in Pittsburgh on Oc- 
tober 20. 

Dr. H. J. Williams, ex-'%, is ,in the 
automobile business in Harrisburg. 
His address is 135 S. Cameron St. 
1898 

Walter L. HiU, ex-'98, of Scranton, 
was this summer chosen as a member 
of the executive committee of the 
Pennsylvania Bar Association. 
1900 

Anna C. Judd has been spending 
some time in Pittsburgh visiting her 
sister Mrs. Leigh Shields. 

The many friends of Rush Kress 
will regret to hear that his son is 
threatened with tubercular trouble. 

1901 
Secretary, Jennie Davis Phillips, 
Lewisburg, Pa. 

W. J. Peacock, ex-'Ol, is head of the 
department of Personnel at the Nor- 
thern Paper Mills, Green Bay, Wis. 

Mrs. Thomas J. Wright, formerly 
Emma Probasco, of Bridgeton, N. J. 
was in town early in October with 
her son, who is entering college. 

1902 
Secretary, M. L. Drum, Lewisburg. 

Mrs. Clarence Rogers, formerly Lulu ■ 
Welliver, resides in the Saylor apart- 
ments. Ninth and _Penn Sts., Reading. 

1903 
Secretary, W. K. Rhodes, Lewisburg. 

Rev. W. J. Green, ex-'03, is a Baptist 
minister in Chicago, residing at 11346 
Indiana Avenue. 

1904 
Secretary, R. W. Thompson, Lewisburg, 
Pa. 

Clyde Dale Wolfe, attorney- at-law 
at Wewoka, Okla. spent several days 
in Lewisburg with relatives and 
friends. He recently represented the 
the National Guard of Oklahoma in 
the National Rifle meet in Ohio. 

"The Recall," official organ of the 
Wallace W. Fetzer Post, No. 71, 
American Legion, publishes in its Sep- 
tember issue a biography of the late 
Colonel Fetzer, written Frederick H 
Godcharles. 

Edwin P. Griffith has lately been 
added to the legal department of the 
Philadelphia Company. His new address 
is 435 Sixth Ave. Pittsburgh, Pa. 

William M. Martz with the Otis 



Elevator Co. of Buffalo, N. Y. is at 
present "vacationing" down on the 
farm at Crowl, Northumberland Co., 
Penna. 

1905 
Secretary, E. A. Morton, Park Bldg., 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Ray P. Bowen, ex-'05, is at present 
studying English Literature at the 
Sorbonne, Paris. 

Harold Lesher, who is farming at 
Northumberland, Pa. is active in local 
educational work. He is at the present 
time secretary of the school board. 

1906 
Secretary, R. C. Hassrick, 1028 Land 
Title Bldg., Philadielphia, Pa. 

J. G. Deininger is an educator in 
Tulsa, Okla. He resides at 15 North 
Union Ave. 

The Reverend J. Wallace Green, 
Pastor of the Tacony Baptist church 
at Disston and Hagerman Streets, Ta- 
cony, Philaelphia, is doing a magnifi- 
cent work in this church. He makes 
extensive use of church literature. 

1907 
Secretary, L. L. Rockwell, Lewisburg. 

C. E. Brockway is director of the 
Community Training Class of the 
East Side Baptist Church of Sharon 
and otherwise active in community 
work. 

George A. Riggs and Margaret 
Lesher Riggs are spending a six 
months furlough from their mission 
field in Porto Rico on the Lesher farm 
at Northumberland. They are rejoicing 
in the arrival of a son, James Franklin, 
born September 18th. George attend- 
ed the Home-coming Day game as the 
guest of the scribe and expresed himself 
as delighted with the progress of the 
Lfniversity since his last visit. 

Mary Stanton Speicher has been in- 
strumental in organizing the Berks 
County Bucknell Club which promises 
to be one of the most active of the 
local clubs this year. 

Howard G. Wascher, ex-'07, is re- 
building and operating a plant for 
the manufacture of com products. 
His address is, in care of, Pierre 
Verley, Negociant, Haubourdin, Nord 
France and other parts of Europel 

1908 
Secretary, Paul G. Stolz, Lewisburg. 

Helen Forrest Hershey (Mrs. J.C.) 
of Chicago expects to spend November 
and December in Lewisburg. 

1909 
Secretary, Anna R. Carey, Lewisburg. 

The Rev. Charles Bromley had the 
pleasure of entertaining at his sum- 
mer home in the hills above Ning Po, 
China, Dr. and Mrs. Harry Em- 
erson Fosdick, who toured China 
this summer. In a home let- 

ter, Charlie says: "Dr. Fosdick 
gave us four wonderful messages during 
his stay. All are well and enjoying a 
good summer." He returned to his 
work in Ning Po in September. 

Edna Meacham is an instructor in 
physics at the University of Wiscon- 
sin. 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



11 



P 



ersonais 



L 



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1910 
Secretary, P. J. Abraham, Greensburg. 

So fearful were the people of Jersey 
Shore that Frank L. Painter, princi- 
pal of the High School, would resign 
that position to accept one of several 
other offers, that virtually all the stu- 
dents and three hundred business men 
and citizens of the town petitioned the 
school board for his reelection. 

Hannah Bubb visited Mrs. H. V. 
Fisher at Bethlehem during Septem- 
ber. 

Florence V. Stauffer is head of the 
English Department in the Newark, 
N. J. High School. She resides at 92 
S. Tenth St. 

W. Lee Sprout is teaching Math- 
ematics and English in the Picture 
Rocks High School. 

1911 
Secretary, M. K. Grossman, Coates- 
ville, Pa^ R. D. 4. 

Mrs. Alexander J. Kelly, formerly 
Helen A. C. Scott, resides at 350 
Jefferson Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

1912 
Secretary, H. S. Everett, in care of, 
Mrs. R. B. Hastings, 5556 Kenwood 
Ave., Chicago, 111. 

H. S. Everett left September 30 for 
Chicago to resume his graduate work 
at the University of Chicago. Mrs. 
Everett and infant daughter accom- 
panied him. 

Daniel M. Wise is telephone trans- 
mission man located at 429 Telegraph 
Bldg., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Clinton T. Hanks, ex-'12, is in the 
Quartermaster General's office. State 
House, Trenton, N. J., engaged in cler- 
ical work. His address is 138 West 
State St. 

1913 
Secretary, George K. Middleton, Sy- 
racuse, N. Y. 

Dr. A. N. Redelin is assistant surgeon 
at the Coaldale Hospital, Coaldale, Pa. 

Ralph A. Still has given up the news- 
paper game and is now associated with 
the National City Company, Morris 
Bid?., Philadelphia. 

He'en K. Bartol spent the summer 
in Europe, for the most part in France, 
where she studied French in the Univer- 
sity at Grenoble. While there she met 
grandson of William Bucknell. On her 
return trip she was on the Berengaria, 
formerly the Imperator, which broke the 
New York passenger record by carrying 
792 saloon passengers, the largest num- 
ber ever arriving on a single ship. 

Dr. Fayette Eshelman, who has been 
doing graduate work in eye, ear, nose 
and throat at the New York Post Grad- 
uate Hospital and the University of 
Pennsylvania, has opened offices at 436 
Miners Bank Bldg., Wilkes Barre, Pa., 
as a specialist in the treatment of 
these organs. 

1914 
Secretary, John W. Rice, Columbia 
University, New York City. 

Harry B. Weaver is principal of 
schools at Kittanning. 



Lewis Lyne was prevented from at- 
tending Home-coming Day by the ill- 
ness of his wife, whom he accompanied 
to Saranac Lake, her case having been 
diagnosed as tuberculosis. 

Dr. Raymond T. Francis, ex-'14, is 
a physician and surgeon at Oxnard, Cal. 

Russell Hamblin has returned to 
Chicago to finish his work for the doc- 
torate in classical languages. 

Frances and Florence Barber are 
teaching this year at Woodbury, N. J. 

1915 
SecretJiry, John B. Rishel, Williamsport. 

George T. Keech is now located at 
4919 Sheridan Road, Chicago. He was 
in Lewisburg for Home-coming Day, 
enroute to his old home in New Jersey. 

Dr. Carlton A. Michael is practicing 
medicine at Wytheville, Virginia. 

Mrs. Ammon W. Smith, formerly 
Winifred Werkheiser, is located at 1159 
Erie Ave., Williamsport. Her husband 
is a Lutheran minister. 

The Rev. Fred H. Fahringer may now 
be addressed at 9028 Houston Ave., 
Chicago. 

Mark M. Walter is engaged in 
Vocational Education in Coatesville. 
He resides at 1313 East Main St. 

1916 
Secretary, Mary L. Jones, 300 Arling- 
ton Ave., E. McKeesport. 
(This story reached the Alumni Office 
just too late for the October issue.) 

The class of 1916, Bucknell University, 
was well represented at its fifth reunion 
in June. There were about fifty mem- 
bers back and each and everyone had 
a very enjoyable time. 

Some of the members who returned 
found it impossible to stay until the 
luncheon on Tuesday evening. There 
were however eighteen who did attend 
and enjoyed it to the greatest possible 
extent. 

At the luncheon an informal business 
meeting was held in which it was de- 
cided that all the officers excepting 
secretary should remain the same as in 
1916. Miss Mary L. Jones was elected 
permanent secretary. Several plans 
were suggested as to a class memorial. 
There is money for a memorial in the 
treasury but each member felt that at 
present there is not enough money to 
leave a memorial fine enough to repre- 
sent the splendid class of 1916. At the 
reunion in 1926 a memorial will be de- 
cided upon. 

Each person was called upon for an 
informal address. D. L. Ranck, the 
president, told the class that he now is 
employed by the Narrow Fabric Com- 
pany at Reading. He is married and 
has three children. Carrie Foresman 
lives in Lewisburg and spends her time 
keeping the people of Lewisburg clean. 
Verna Noll lives in Lewisburg and 
teaches in the Williamsport High 
School. Florence Rollins teaches in 
the Altoona High School. Olive Park 
teaches in MifHinburg. Sara Park 

teaches in the Springdale High School. 



Ruth Williams Hamlin lives in Phila- 
delphia and has one chUd. Helen 
Groff is teaching. Dorothy Bunnell 
Schnure lives at Sparrows Point, Md. 
and has two children. Mary Jones 
teaches in the Rochester High School. 
Maurice Cook and Margaret Evans 
Cook live in Pittsburgh and have one 
child. Mr. Cook works for the Bureau 
of Mines. Russell Everett is married 
and lives in Newark. He is doing engi- 
neering work in New York. Samuel 
Bryant works for the du Pont Powder 
Company in Wilmington, Delaware. 
R. J. W. Templin is a professor at 
Lafayette College and has five children. 
Clarence Glass has charge of athletics at 
Bucknell and has three children. John 
De Haven teaches in the Donora High 
School and has two children. The 
luncheon ended with songs and cheers 
for the class of 1916, her sister classes, 
and her beloved alma mater; and with 
promises to return to the next reunion 
if possible. 

Mary L. Jones, Secretary, 
300 Arligton Ave., 
East McKeesport, Pa. 

1917 

Secretary, C. C. Gillette, Castlegate 
Road, EdgeiRTood Acres, Wilkinsburg, 
Pa. 

Paul W Boggess is supervising prin- 
cipal of the Hartley Township Schools, 
residing at Laurelton, Pa. 

George B. Champion is now located 
at MontoursviUe. 

Warner M. Galloway, ex '17, is an 
ordnance inspector in the U. S. Arsenal 
and residing at 1509 Fourth Ave., 
Watervliet, N. Y. 

Ariel Kroraer may be addressed in 
care of the National Committee Y.W. 
C. A., 12 San Chome, Tamachi, 
Ishigome, Tokio, Japan. 

Feliz V. Mikolajczak is engaged in 
fruit and poultry raising at Chestnut 
Knoll, Milford, Delaware. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. S. Pedi,;o reside ai 
409 East Fayette St., Syracuse, N. Y. 
Mr. Pedigo is a chemist for the General 
Chemical Company. 

Betty Redelin Davis (Mrs. Roscoe 
G.) was operated on for appendicitis at 
the Geisinger Hospital Danville, 
Penna., October 15. 

"Ted" Hilty has accepted a new 
position as a special teacher of reading 
in the Watt School, Pittsburgh, Pa., and 
is living at the Tri Delta House, 4904 
Forbes St. 

1918 

Secretary, Barton H. Mackey, 4223 
Baltimore Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 

"The Baptist" of October 15 has a 
picture of David Boswell, who is in the 
Home Mission Department of the 
Northern Baptist Convention. 

Margaret Dolphin Dalton, ex '18, 
resides at 47 Claremont Ave., New York 
City. 

(Continued on Page Twelve) 



12 



BUCKNELL ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



"Among Those Present' 



This incomplete list of alumni who 
attended the Lafayette game was secur- 
ed from several of the fraternities. 

Phi Theta Sigma greeted the follow- 
ing alumni : Richard T. Carvolth. '21, 
Clarence H. Key, '21, Holmes T. Doug- 
las, '21, Frank T. Taylor, '21. 

The Lambda Chis were hosts to : 
Ernest W. Hewitt, '20, Hazard C. Chase, 
'IS, John B. Rishel, '15, "Danny" Mc- 
Neal, '15, Chas. J. Hay, '17, Chas. W. 
Potter, '17, Howard L. Harer, '17 Ernest 
F. Sonder, '19, Thomas (Si) Morgan, 
'21, Harry V. Thomas, '21, Robert B. 
Smith, '20, George E. Rickert, ex '20, 
Robert L. Hulsizer, '21, Wm. J. Rolfe, 
'20, Llewellyn Jones, '20, Hilding Lar- 
son, '21, Wm. E. Nichols, ' 21, Raymond 
Hidlay, ex '21, John M. KaufEman, ex 
'22, Charles B, Kreitner, '19, James R. 
Waldron, '20. 

Delta Sigma entertained . Elton 
P. Richards, '20, C. Walter Lotte, '14, 
Alexander R. Roller, '21, E. LaRue 
Kohler, '21. 

The following were guests of the 
Forum: Geo. A. Riggs, '07, Dwight W. 
Rude, '20, L. A. Eaton, '20, Nelson S. 
Rounsley, '21 Richard Templin, '16, 
Malcolm Emerick, '20, George B. Nes- 
line, '21, John Winkleblech, '14, Ralph 
F. Davenport, '12, Chas. Fryling, '13, 
Gilbert Meredith, '15, Harold Germer, 
,19, Lester Bartlett, '16, George T. 
Keech, '15, Clay Sanders, '13 

Kappa Sigma welcomed: Meredith 
A. Abbott, '17, Charles Baldwin, '08, 
William Baldwin, '09, Wm. P. Bach- 
man, '18, Joseph Bittenbender, '05, Roy 
Bostwick, '05, George Cockill, '05, 
Judge J. Warren Davis, '96, John Davis, 
'02, Roscoe Davis, '16, Oliver J. Decker, 
'99, D. A. Green, '08, Richart R. Heck- 
art, '21 H. LeRoy Heller, '21, Russell 
F. HeUer, '21, Donald S. Laher, '21, 
Martin K. Mohler, '21, Richard A. 
Mason, '21, Michael MacDonough, '10, 
Francis P. McDermott, '21, Edward 
Nancarrow, '16, Harry Nancarrow, '20, 
"Hank" Norman, '16, "Bill" Sweitzer, 
ex '20, T. Cortland Williams, '20, J. 
Stephen Wargo, '21, "Joe" Golightly, 
'14, George H. Catterall, '99, MerriU F. 
Fairheller, '18, Luther P. Ilgen, '19, 
Anthony J. Murray, '13, Clifford E. 
Wentz, ex '21. 

The "Sig Alphs" to return were: 
Leroy Butler, '97, Gottlieb L. Freuden- 
berger, '01, Sylvester B. Dunlap, '03, 
Wendell M. August, '07, E. M. Fassett, 
'07, Ralph A. Still, '11, Paul R. Wendt, 
'13, Melville Beardsley, '15, Dalton W 
Bell, ex-'15, George T. Bender, '17, 
Howard C. Liebenberger, '17, J. L. 
Miller, ex-'18, Sidney J. Peale, '20, R. C. 
Umlauf, '20, Nelson E. Chance, '20, 
Charles B. Wainwright, ex-'20, Lester 
K. Ade, '21, Grant Painter, '17, Albert 
F. Herbine, ex-'20, Walter D. Roos, '20, 
L. H. Shea, ex-'20. Rov D. Snider, ex- 
'19, John B. Vanderbilt, ex '20, Allen 
R. Haus, '21, Robert P. Hartz, '21, 
Howard C. Shelly, '21, Stewart 
Williams,, '21, WiUiard Thomas, ex '22 
Norman Stewart, ex-'22, Lewis P. Rob- 
inson, '12, Joseph Fox, ex-'22 Edwin J. 
McGill, ex-'22, Chester L.Bardole, ex- 
'23, Ralph R. Koser, ex-'99, Ralph L. 
Bedford, ex-'05, Wra. G. Murdock, ex-'04, 
Edward R. Innis, '08, Frank H. 
Painter, '10, James A. Tyson, '11. 



The following is a list of the alumni 
who visited the Sigma Chi House 
over the week end; B. R. Seeman, ex 
'21, H. J. Wagner, '21, W. P. Edwards, 
'21, W. A. Shipman Jr., ex '23, S. M. 
Shipman, Harold NefE, '11, H. R. Coul- 
son, '11 James A. Pangburn, '20, W. 
(Fat) Kaiser, '15, C. A. Waldner, '17, 
Carl C. Law, '85, C. M. Bashore, '21, 
Sterling Post, '17, T. J. Mangan, '19, 
G. W. Chessman, '05, A. R. Mathieson, 
'20, D. E. MeUinger, '17, E. R. Hass- 
rick, '18, N. R. Hill, ex '16, H. F. 
Sheffer, '18, M. E. Musser, '18, Francis 
E. Rougeux, ex '22, Dr. Edward Pang- 
burn, '15, Carl Millward, '06, J. F. 
Gdaniec, '15, Earle B. West, '17, James 
K. Pettite, '19, Thomas B. Williams, '15, 
W. W. Portser, '05, Stewart Duncan, 
'08. 

The following Phi Gamma Delta 
alumni were welcomed by their active 
chapter : WiUard Bunnel, '97, Merle 
Edwards, '03, Earl Morton, '05 
Robert Royer, '05, Thomas Wood, '05, 
"Red" Bliss, '05, Spencer Harris, '07, 
"Red" Bliss, '05, Spenser Harris, '07, 
'12, Berkley Hastings, '13, Walter Harris, 
'14, Francis J. Beckley, '17, John Kriner, 
'17, George Champion, '17, Henry 
Fonda, '18, Herbert Grice, '18, Albert 
Gibbs, ex-'18, Everett Jones, '19, David 
Martin, '19, Franklin Jones, '19, Clar- 
ence Davis, '20, George Schuyler, '20, 
Harold Shimer, '20, John Carter, '20, 
Willard Diffendafer, ex '22, Robert 
Shereden, ex '22, William Schreyer, ex 
'22, Karl D. Smith, '19. 

Among the guests at the Women's 
College were the following: Marguerite 
Lotte, '21, Katherine Fulford, '21, 
Pauline Schenck, '20, Elthera Corson, 
'20, Bess Davis, '21, Helen Ruggles- 
Abbott, (Music '18), Florence Stauffer, 
'10, Anna Downing, '17, Edith Gardner, 
'20, Cecil Hazen, (Music '21), Emily 
Mackey, (Music '18), Marjorie McCoy, 
'21, Ada Brooks-Nancarrow, '12, Henri 
etta Heinsling, '17, Aileen Johnston- 
Conelly, '17, Emily Kurtz, ex '22, Anna 
Hill, ex '23, Betty Weidner, '21 Ruth 
Mount, '21, Irene Fritz, '19, Mabel Fritz, 
'18, Florence Cleary, '19, Mary Reese- 
Leibensberger, '17, Hazel Craig-Jackson, 
'099, Florence Michael, '18, Helen 
M^tthews-McCurdy, ex '20, Lucile 
Rutherford, ex '21, Aileen Baumeister, 
ex-'22, Margaret Allen, '19, Geraldine 
Hansen- Giffin, ex '17, Elizabeth Cham- 
pion, '18, Jane Irey, '13, Anna Sterling, 
'20, Marjorie Sprout, '21, Helen Lewis- 
Lowry, '16, Jessie McFarland-Thomas, 
'05, Frances McFarland, ex-'20, Marga- 
ret Fowler, ex-'23, Luella Frank- 
Shortiss, ex-'15. 

® 



1919 



Personals 

Thomas H. Eshelman is in his junior 
year in dentistry at the University of 
Pittsburgh. 

Henry L. Fonda has purchased an 
estate in Virginia, three miles from the 
University of Virginia. 

Mary Speece is teaching science at 
the Atlantic City High School. She 
resides at the New Holland Hotel. 

Florine Michael, who is at home in 
Laceyville, had a nervous breakdown 
in the early summer due to over work, 
but is now entirely recovered. 



Secretary, W. L. Gerhardt, Lewisbiirg. 

Ora B. Smith is teaching science and 
mathematics in Townsend, Montana. 

Alden E. Davis returns this year as 
instructor to Boston University. He 
will also study in the Graduate Shcool 
of Business Administration at Harvard. 
During the summer he sang in the 
First Baptist Church of Boston, where 
he ran across "Newt" Fetter, '09, who 
has charge of student work there. 

Florence Cleary is at her home in 
Dunmore. 

Margaret Finerty is teaching in the 
Dunmore High School. 

Ruth Minnig is the new secretary of 
Hazleton Alumni Club. 

Elizabeth F. Spyker is teacher of gen- 
eral science in the Woodbury, N. J. 
High School. 

1920 
Secretary, H. L. Nancarrow, Box 677, 
Altoona, Pa. 

Wm. P. Heckendorn is concrete en- 
gineer for the Portland Cement Asso- 
ciation. His address is 347 Madison 
Ave., New York City. 

Evan Ingram spent the summer at 
the boy's camp at Brackney, Pa. He 
returns this fall to Tome Institute. 

Robert S. Kyle is with the Federal 
Board of Vocational Education. He 
may be addressed at 1538 Master St., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Walter S. Lee is district sales man- 
ager for the Bakewell Motor Car Com- 
pany. His address is 418 CaUfomia 
Ave., Oakmont, Pa. 

H. C. Reed is teaching civics and 
algebra in Abington High School, 
suburban Philadelphia. 

® 

Hill and Burg. 

(Continued from Page Ten) 

The Varsity tennis team composed of 
Lybarger, Koch, Purnell and Hoffa, de- 
feated Susquehanna's racquet wielders 
6-0 at Lewisburg October 1. 



The Y.M.C.A. organized a Student 
Self-Help Bureau to assist students in 
securing work about the town. Sam- 
uel H. Rickard of Philadelphia is in 
charge. 

D. Hobart Evans '21 stopped over for 
several days while on his way to Prince- 
ton Theological Seminary where he is 
preparing for the Presbyterian ministry. 

Dean Llewellyn Phillips represented 
Bucknell at the inauguration of Dr. 
John M. Thomas as president of Penn- 
sylvania State College. Professor 
Frank Burpee, Benjamin Wilson and 
Paul A. Weaver attended the engineer- 
ing conferences held before the inskUg- 
ural. 

President Emory W. Hunt has been 
keeping Bucknell before the public by 
speaking at many churches and conven- 
tions. At the South Dakota Baptist 
State Convention held October 5-9, Dr. 
Hunt gave seven inspirational talks. 
Here he met